Hoodler

Band Saw Or Scroll Saw?

21 posts in this topic

I am considering purchasing a saw . I want to be more consistent with my crankbaits. What saw would you go with .

Band or Scroll.

I am currently using a jigsaw (worn out). After making a couple of crankbaits.

I came to realize that I can't be as accurate as I

should be.

Your input would be helpful.

Thanks in advance.

John

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Go with a scroll.

With the round blades you can get in the small cuts plus they also have sanding blades for tight areas.

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I've used both, and if I could only choose one I'd definitely go with a bandsaw. A scroll saws main purpose is to make tiny cuts no other tool can make (such as curves with a very tight radius), but that's about it. A bandsaw is a general-purpose tool, and is much better suited to lure building than a scroll saw.

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I have both and probably haven't touched my scroll saw in 15 years...Bandsaw is the only was to go..Nathan

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I went with a band saw and have not regretted it. Just remember than with any saw it is not the final step. You still need to sand your blank to it's final proportions. (unless your REALLY good with a saw) I cut my blanks on the band saw just outside the layout lines. It's then sanded on a combination belt/disc sander (wish I'd bought an oscillating drum sander instead) to the final dimensions.

Just remember that you will have to tune your band saw. You can't just take it out of the box, start sawing and expect to have perfectly straight cuts. The blade guides have to be set and the table should be checked frequently for squareness to the blade. You will also need to make sure the blade is tensioned properly and that it is running in the center of the drive wheels. This may sound like a lot of trouble, but it only takes a few minutes to do.

good luck,

Ben

Edited by RayburnGuy

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Either will get the job done. I started out with a good variable speed scroll saw and never changed. It cuts exactly along the layout line and does lip slots accurately. It is slow to cut thick hardwood like basswood but what the heck, I'm in no hurry. It will cut balsa as fast as you want to push it. Had I to do over again, I'd probably get a band saw for its speed. Its blade cuts continuously while a scroll saw cuts only on its down stroke - but I don't regret the scroll saw. I use standard 12 tpi 1/4" wide blades with mine.

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Thanks guys, I was kinda leaning to the band saw and your posts kinda sealed the deal.

Just gotta work some OT to pay for it.

John

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I second RayburnGuy, and would add that the smaller the blade you use on a band saw the tighter the turn you can make, like around the tail end of a lure. After using one for years in my shop work and realizing how inaccurate they really are, I believe it would be hard to make bunches of identical lures that really are identical. Close but not identical. To much free hand work to be identical. Just my $.02 worth. Musky Glenn

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My idea was to make them as close as possible. Unless you are Turning on a lathe I'm not sure you could free hand any lure and have it look, measure, or run just alike. Well I guess you could make your own moulds but I not sure I have the time or resources to do that.

John

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I have a scroll saw that I bought off craigslist for 20$ it does a great job and hae been very happy with it. A band saw would be my first choice if money was not an issue. But the scroll is a great tool!

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I have been reading through the formus about bandsaws and scroll saws. Seems band saws are the way to go. I don't want to spend any more than $300. Is Proxxon the way to go? Anyone want to make any suggestions as far as brands go. I cut lexan, balsa, and basswood now. I would like to get into PCV boards.

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Band saw hands down. As far as accuracy I cut close to the pattern line and final shaping is done sanding. I move much quicker that way and in my opinion get much better accurate results. I have a scroll saw also but would only mess with it in the smallest of baits. I used it for lips at one time but a good pair of tin snips and sanding wheel faster in my book once again. I get consistent results and don't spend a lot of time in doing so. Not identical but these used a band saw and sanding drum attachment on a drill press. I find the sanding drum a big help for a lot of things until I move up. No hand sanding would take much longer but not bad on basswood and balsa isn't an issue at all.

DSC_0121.jpg

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I got a SKIL brand band saw. The in-laws gave it to me as a christmas gift. It works but thats bout all. I dont like the table/deck on it. It has ribs that run in the straight cut feed direction. So if I want to make curved cuts it makes it a little more difficult cause the ribs want to catch/snag the wood. So I use my scroll saw mostly. I say all this to say dont buy a SKIL.

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Bandsaw is also much better for cutting thermoplastics. The scroll saw sucks hardcore and only serves to melt the plastic and then re-bond. You can make a cut all the way through and find the cut path stronger than the rest.

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I have a basic entry level delta band saw. I think it was around 120 bucks, there may be a model under I am not for sure. I have had to replace a few parts associated with the blade tension portion (seems to be a common problem). As far as cranks it is fine and will work for some resawing and other woodworking. If one enjoys doing some woodworking I would jump up some and get a better unit, I know it is one of the first things on my list to get replaced.

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I got a SKIL brand band saw. The in-laws gave it to me as a christmas gift. It works but thats bout all. I dont like the table/deck on it. It has ribs that run in the straight cut feed direction. So if I want to make curved cuts it makes it a little more difficult cause the ribs want to catch/snag the wood. So I use my scroll saw mostly. I say all this to say dont buy a SKIL.

Try making a table cover from 1/4" melamine, or some other smooth faced, thin sheet material.

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Try making a table cover from 1/4" melamine, or some other smooth faced, thin sheet material.

Good idea Mark! I might get something and try that out. What would be ideal is to find something thin and strong enough that I could still use my guide for straight cuts without having to remove it.

Edited by bbf

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I have both but always use my bandsaw. I have a 12-inch Jet. One tip that I would give you is this: DO NOT buy an off-brand model bandsaw unless they use standard size blades. Many off-brand saws use odd size blades that are hard to find.

Gene

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I use a scroll saw. I use thin blades that are used to cut PVC. You can be much more accurate with those small blades and experience less blade breakage. I get them at Lowes. They are in a red package. Cutting out baits with any saw is a skill that is learned just like painting. Patience and practice will make you good at it. And as Lincoya suggested, get a name brand saw. Great advice.

Skeeter

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