J. Pierce

Any Lacquer Paint Lovers?

18 posts in this topic

I have been reading and learning a lot here, but I still have not made any baits yet.

I have a couple of airbrushes laying around and a whole shop full of tools.

The only thing I need to get on hand is paint.

It seems Createx has the biggest following, but I keep thinking about using lacquers. I'm not concerned about odor, I have the facilities to spray in. I like the lacquer paint because I think it would cure faster.

Am I leaning the wrong way?

I know it's a loaded question and everyone has their own favorites, but I would like to hear your opinions.

Thanks

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I have been making bait only a few years . I use lacquer airbrush paints by wildlife creations these are the paints used by taxadermist . I tried the createx water base paints a did not like them at all .

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Many of us never get into lacquers because of the toxicity but having seen lacquer painted lures, my impression is they make for some very nice baits with vibrant colors. If you have the facility and already have a "lacquer skill set", there's certainly no reason to avoid them.

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Suggest you set up a paint test to test what key colors you want to see and what traits you want your lures to show. You can test water based vs. lacquer and/or vs. other paints like epoxy, enamel, etc.

If your lures will be made of wood, you can buy small quantities of water, lacquer or whatever paints for test. Using pop sickle sticks you can dip or spray sanding sealer, primer, color, and top coats and let them cure between coats. While your tests are curing, you can compare the sticks and see which tests meet your criteria. For example if you want a bright white and pop sickle stick tests show white is off white, or pearl white or maybe polar white, you can clearly see what is best for you.

Meanwhile as your paint test is underway, you can start making lures and start painting a few to see how your colors works.

Oh yeah, if you want to add tests, you can drill a hole in each pop sickle stick of a given test, insert a piece of braided line and tie them all together. This will let you compare overall or color by color say Createx with Badger, Testors, Tamiya and so on. You may find that you like say yellow from Createx, red from Badger or something else from other suppliers. You may also find that the top coat you like works well over one color but not too good over another color. You can accelerate wear by heating, hanging in Sun outside or lighting up test rings of pop sickle sticks. Also the test rings are good to refer back to years later when a supplier suddenly discontinues one of the colors you want.

Good luck.

John

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we use lacquers.

they are great for fast dry and hold well. remember on wood lures seal the wood. then use a good lacquer prime. from there you can apply any other paints,enamels,,water base over your base coats.

been working for us over 20 years.

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Hey guys I really appreciate you taking the time to reply. I've been lurking here for months and it i thought it looked like a great community of helpful people, and you have proven that!

I am a custom furniture maker by trade so I deal with toxic finishes on a daily basis so squirting a little extra lacquer on a Sunday to paint a couple baits is not an issue for me personally.

The taxidermy lacquers are exactly what I was thinking about ordering, but I may order some water based airbrush paints to experiment with as well.

The suggestion to do some samples and test durability over time is a great idea too.

I doubt I will ever get around to doing some of the highly detailed realistic paint jobs I see some of you guys doing. For now I will be happy to make a few utilitarian baits. I have made tons of things out of wood over the years. Pretty soon I will be able to add baits to my done it list.

Thanks again, this site and all you guys have been a huge source of useful information.

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I work with lacquer everyday as do you and just from feed back of clients and custumers as to what happens to cabinets and furniture when they come in contact with water! Or the wife screams at ya for not using a coaster under your beer! that being said, lacquer and water hate each other, I agree that sealing and priming your baits with solvent based materials can be an advantage maybe even your color choices but for final clear I would gaurrentee failure at some point.Lacquer is to britol and does not have any give or Flex. I am currently in the process of the change over to waterbourne lacquers in a couple of shops and will be trying out dipping my cranks in it to test but typically they are intended for interior use so I think you would be asking for problems using it in water all day long not to mention temp change constantly from sun to cool water.. Just my 2 cents I'm knew to TU also and learning a ton of stuff! There are some pros on here with serious talent and tested waters far beyond what i know but I do know lacquer of all brands and types and their characteristcs. Do you use conversion varnish at all it might hold out longer as its a little tougher.

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I didn't mean to suggest using either lacquer or water based acrylic paints without topcoating it with a durable waterproof clearcoat. On my crankbaits, I figure any kind of paint or coating will stay on the lure if you topcoat it with a moisture cured urethane, epoxy, or automotive clearcoat (provided the various coatings are compatible enough not to bubble).

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I should have been more clear in my original post.

I was looking at using lacquer paints only, not as a topcoat.

I have been looking at polytranspar and other taxidermy lacquers. I'm starting to see an advantage to createx type paints. They are available in small quantities. I could see myself experimenting with paints and buying five gallons to paint two three inch poppers....lol

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I've been using House of Kolor paints since 06 and have never had a problem with adhesion nor ill effects from water intrusion. Automotive lacquers are very different than cabinet finishing products, as well they will be top coated. Aside from the drying time advantage, these paints can be reduced far beyond any water based product, and still remain useable. This results in a very fine pigment useful in shading and blending. These products are available in 2 and 4 ounce ready to spray bottles at a similar price range. One disadvantage is color selection, they have fantastic metallics and pearls, but you'll have to mix your own natural colors,( That's where the fun begins!) I have had good results top coating with both automotive urethanes and hobby epoxies. The best advice is to test for yourself side by side before you make an expensive investment. Good Luck,

Douglas

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I should have been more clear in my original post.

I was looking at using lacquer paints only, not as a topcoat.

I have been looking at polytranspar and other taxidermy lacquers. I'm starting to see an advantage to createx type paints. They are available in small quantities. I could see myself experimenting with paints and buying five gallons to paint two three inch poppers....lol

Yea it's hard to find chartreuse and such in the taxadermist paints .
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I learned about lacquers from Kermett Adams, and I use the Testors R/C colors, and Jannsnetcraft vinyl. They are compatible. The only colors of vinyl I use are clear, white, green chartreuse, and pearl white. I use these in combo with all the killer Testors colors, and its a simple and versatile system of painting plugs. They pop! All are cut with acetone.

M

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Thanks,

I was thinking the testors paints were enamels not lacquer.

No. These (Testors R/C) are used to paint Lexan bodies on R/C cars. Fast cure. I'll do scale patterns with tule fabric in an embroidery hoop, and I can carefully handle the bait within seconds (15-30?)to do the other side. Kermett Adams has one of the best E-books on the net for making AND painting plugs. I think its around 20$? Dont care, cause its worth every penny.Covers the whole thing on lacquers, using the system I mentioned. The pearls and metal flakes are super. Thanx Kerm!

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I use lacquer. Polytranspar, Lifetone and fingernail polish. You can also thin enamel with acetone or lacquer thinner.

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Most everything I shoot is lacquer based thinned with acetone or lac thinner...

One thing no one mentioned is buying a big can of a quality clear lacquer, thin down to spray through your airbrush, and then possibilities are unlimited... I use auto or worm pouring pearls,powder pigments and metalic powders, micro glitters and flip flops... mix them into the clear, as well as any tints or dyes, like worm or lure dye, even Ritt dye to get great trans colors. Once you get comfortable with the system, you can even mix in other paints and pigments to hot lacquers with good results... Enamels actually work well to pigment the lacquers and spray nicely in thinned clear or white lacquer with near instant drying qualities.

Always do this in well ventilated area!

Edited by CatchingConcepts
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I've been to busy to try painting yet, but all this great info is getting me fired up.

The clear coat suggestion sound like it could open up a bunch of possibilities.

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