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Matador Customs

Lunker Punker Top Coat?

13 posts in this topic

Ive been succesful at making some segmented swimbaits and everything has worked out well

Except the finishing touch, the top coat. Im using

Etex and found that 3 out of 5 lures theres peeling

Where the joints touch and only after using them once. Im pleased with the results overall but was wondering what is used on the lunker punkers. I recently bought the wooden version and its top coat is something i would like to use. Seems very

Durable, smooth and has a professional look to it. Does anyone know what it is?

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I haven't purchased a wood one for several years, but there were using 2-ton. Thus the reason why they peel after getting damaged. I have used 2-ton on the little punkers, but I don't believe in thinning. So I don't dare try a big punker. I spray them and any jointed bait with an auto clear.

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I dont know if jeremy would be willing to divulge any info on his methods, but its worth a try to ask.

Thanks for the contact.

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I haven't purchased a wood one for several years, but there were using 2-ton. Thus the reason why they peel after getting damaged. I have used 2-ton on the little punkers, but I don't believe in thinning. So I don't dare try a big punker. I spray them and any jointed bait with an auto clear.

So how long before your swimbaits show any wear around the hard edges if any? Also what type of auto clear do you use.

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Based on the number of punkers I've repainted for guys, I'm not sure they're using anything great for a topcoat. I agree if its not Devcon 2 ton I'd be surprised....it definitely comes apart like shards of glass...very brittle. When I redo them I use 2-3 coats of e-tex and it seems to be outperforming their one coat of devcon. I would apply at least two coats of e-tex and wait for it to setup a little bit before applying it. I absolutely agree though with Gunnie, jointed lures are best handled being sprayed with auto clear. You'll need to get setup for it...its nasty stuff to breath but thats another topic. Search the threads on auto clear and you'll be up to speed. Ahhh clear coats....You'll get wear in the joints...its just the way it goes. If your using wood make sure your sealing the wood well.

JK

Edited by jkustel

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Yea i seal them with a slightly thinned coat of etex, making sure it gets soaked in the pores. As for auto clear i might have to go that route. Im planning to sell a few and dont want any unhappy customers. Any suggestions on which brand or type of auto clear.

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Most swimbaits are using some kind of a spray-on clear..........look no further than your nearest auto body shop.

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Lunker Punkers are Chinese made, so it is whatever that factory sprays on lures. Judging by the lures in WalMart or Bass Pro, Chinese lure factories should be very experienced when it comes to clearcoating baits

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I've always had problems epoxy topcoating lures with any sharp edges on them. You won't notice it when the epoxy is first applied but it will naturally pull away from any sharp edge on the bait, leaving a very thin film that is easily damaged. If your bait has sharp edges on the segments, that's a problem. You can address it by sanding the edges to a radius but for true durability, it's probably much better to use a moisture cured urethane or an auto 2 part topcoat.

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I had the same experience with epoxy pulling away from joint edges when I used epoxy on my jointed swimbaits.

I got around the epoxy separating on the joint edges by coating the insides of my swimbait joints with D2T, while the bait was disassembled, and lapping it out onto the face 1/4" for a good lap of the face epoxy. Hanging them with the sharper edges down, and checking them often while the D2T set up, helped to avoid drips, and keep the epoxy on the edges. If I did wind up with a drip, I could sand or file it smooth after the D2T hardened, and still have a good coating of both the joint face and the edge.

Then I assembled the bait and put it on the drying wheel, where I would coat it with Etex on the faces only. D2T seems to hold on edges better, but I was careful to round the edges slightly.

Doing it that way let me coat and recoat the swimbait faces while they were assembled, without having to worry about coating inside the joints. The D2T was plenty thick enough with just one coat, while I put three coats of the Etex on the faces.

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I had the same experience with epoxy pulling away from joint edges when I used epoxy on my jointed swimbaits.

I got around the epoxy separating on the joint edges by coating the insides of my swimbait joints with D2T, while the bait was disassembled, and lapping it out onto the face 1/4" for a good lap of the face epoxy. Hanging them with the sharper edges down, and checking them often while the D2T set up, helped to avoid drips, and keep the epoxy on the edges. If I did wind up with a drip, I could sand or file it smooth after the D2T hardened, and still have a good coating of both the joint face and the edge.

Then I assembled the bait and put it on the drying wheel, where I would coat it with Etex on the faces only. D2T seems to hold on edges better, but I was careful to round the edges slightly.

Doing it that way let me coat and recoat the swimbait faces while they were assembled, without having to worry about coating inside the joints. The D2T was plenty thick enough with just one coat, while I put three coats of the Etex on the faces.

Those are exactly the kinds of epoxy problems and solutions which made DN such a blessing for me. Easily-solved storage issues were simple compared with having to watch epoxy cure on a hanging lure and turning it and re-turning it at the exact time to achieve the correct protection thickness. Plus DN protects much better.

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That's why I was so happy when I found PVC as a building material, and water borne urethane as a top coat.

Once again, thank you JR Hopkins and Husky.

Edited by mark poulson

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