jackg

Painting With Brushes

23 posts in this topic

I just tinker from time to time, and dont want to invest in an airbrush. does anybody have any tips for a decent paint job?

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You can buy canned air that connects to a paint sprayer. Its fairly cheap and is the way I first started painting up a few of my lures. It won't get near the detail of an airbrush, but is pretty fun to just tinker around with your baits to see what you come up with. Here is a link to the sprayer:

http://greens-garage.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=8

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Im not sure what the air cans cost to replace but that brush looks exactly like the one Harbor Freight has for $9.99. I got one for $4.99 a few weeks ago with a coupon.

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Jack,

I am a beginner brush painter. I am learning to paint lures with small water color brushes.

http://www.walmart.c...-6-set/17690352

I am following a method taught by Hans Nordin of Sweden. I was introduced to this by Diemai. Currently I am painting with "folk art"acrylics.

http://www.walmart.c...t-2-oz/17300135

But any paint maybe used. The key to success is to thin the paint. I store thinned paint in a set of little plastic painter sets. Using a color wheel the paints may be mixed to just about any color you imagine. I use water based paints because of health, safety,cost and availabiity. I may paint on the couch or kitchen table without much concern of hurting myself or my family. The cost for this set is minimal. I would say for less than 15 bucks you could have nice setup. The little storage cups can be found at dollar tree for a buck. They of course have paint in them already. It up to you to throw this paint away or use. Might be good to play around with?

http://www.dollartre...o?method=search

Once you have your paint ,brushes and lure then it is up to your imagination. The first key to achieve soft shading is thin paint. The second is to use very little paint. Paint in very thin layers. Stencils may also be used or taping off patterns may also be done Just as in airbrushing.

Her is an example of my latest lure using the above method.

Green Snake!

So far I have only done a dozen using the Nordin method.

http://www.outdoor.s...din/wobbler.htm

Prior to this I used the taping and stencil method. Here is an example of this style work.

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If your interested in learning more or have a question I have not answered here feel free to send me a message .

Best of luck.

Vic

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There are several people here at TU that spray paint baits with rattle cans and they paint some really nice color patterns. You might search the archives for "rattle cans" and see what tips you can come up with. You might also do a search for "stencils". Those of us who are less talented with an airbrush use stencils all the time.

good luck,

Ben

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If you paint with a brush . Invest in some good ones . For dots and spots just get an assortment or straight pins , hat pins ect . Stick the point into a pencil eraser . Use the pencil as a handle . Dip the head of the pin . Then touch off the bait . With a little practice you can do perfect dots using the toad method . You can also make quite nice 3D eyes on your bait this way .

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I do the same thing with the flat ends of my drill bits. Very nice effect, every size in the book available.

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I have been using flat round objects too but unhappy with this method for one big reason. If you go too far and mash the bubble of paint it will smear or not be the same as the other one. I have been thinking that an object with a spherical shape or pointed would be better. A shape like the end of of a safety pin as toadfrog suggests. This would allow you to touch the lure without mashing the bubble of paint and make a more consistent dot.

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Jack,

Do not expect the paint to look like much until you get it clear coated. This really brings out the pigment in the paint especially when using cheap water based acrylics.

Good Luck!

Vic

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Hobby paint, couple colors of rattle can paint, tooth brush, painters tape, and a drill bit. You could paint about any pattern you could dream up. This was my equipment I used to get hooked on painting cranks back in 2007.

My favorite pattern to paint and most popular amongst my freinds I use the stuff listed above.

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Hello BJ

 

Sounds like good stuff. Keeping it simple sounds limiting but it really opens door ways. Got any pictures of those baits with a pattern you found to work well?

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My only other suggestion for brush painting... go to Michaels or some store like it and buy a variety pack of brushes and then get yourself some decent paper while your there and take your brushes and use each one to just paint strokes on the paper to see what each brush can do with they type of paint your using... then thin the paint and repeat... it takes some time but its meant to show what you have to work with and what its limits are with not only a full brush of paint but a watered down brush full of paint etc etc etc... it helps alot... as I have said in a thread I started about brush painting the other thing I did was trace out some lures on paper and paint them as well just to see what I could come up with working with what I had... and if you think the paint is dull just spray some glossy clear coat on the page when your done or if your not worried about it thin some D2T down alot and coat the pictures of lures you made and will see what it looks like glossed then and get a better idea of how the colors pop... just my  :twocents:

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Done with rattle can, qtip, and a brush

Nice spatter. Was was experimenting around with spatter this morning using a tooth brush loaded with paint pulling back across the bristles with a popsicle stick sized bit of wood. Bears further experimenting.

 

bill

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Nice spatter. Was was experimenting around with spatter this morning using a tooth brush loaded with paint pulling back across the bristles with a popsicle stick sized bit of wood. Bears further experimenting.

 

bill

 

Instead of "loading" the toothbrush try dipping just the tip of the bristles in the paint. Should be a little easier to control.

 

Ben

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Nice spatter. Was was experimenting around with spatter this morning using a tooth brush loaded with paint pulling back across the bristles with a popsicle stick sized bit of wood. Bears further experimenting.

 

bill

 

The toothbrush and stick method has a real randomness to the splatter effect.

 

Jerry

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BJ

 

One of my favorite combinations too. My brush technique was inspired by splatter paint patterns. Looks real good!! :yay: Thank you for sharing the pic. I find a splash of yellow on the belly instead of red is pretty effective too.

 

I have never used spray cans but I know some really cool effects can be created with them. Here is a bait done with spray cans from the 60's by Boots Anderson. Simple but effective. I like how the overspray shoots down the belly. 

 

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BJ, that is a nice looking bait!

We used to call using a brush to add a textured finish to a plaster job "Dashing".  The plasterer would dip the tips of his horse hair brush, usually a 6" painter's horse hair bristle brush, into the plaster, and then rap it against the handle of the trowel he held in his other hand, to dash the finish onto the plaster face.  It was an old method, used for exterior, mostly, and was very labor intensive/time consuming, but it created a neat effect.

Edited by mark poulson

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Thanks guys. I've heard of dashing before my kids gradfather was a spackle guy before he made fishing a career. I like that bait u have little river. I use a lot of yellow on my baits bellys but he wanted it orange pearl.

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