saltshaker

Dremel-type Tools

23 posts in this topic

I saw that Harbor Freight has the rotary tools like a Dremel. They claim that they are better than a Dremel. :rolleyes: I'd much rather hear what you guys think. Should I chance the knock-off, or, buy name brand?

Thanks

Stan

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I have the same one and use it for the exact same thing. I think it was 7.99. It is good for that but in my opinion not much more. The rpm's are very fast. I also have something similar to this flex shaft that I used when I had my jewelry business. I found this style much easier to control than the "Dremel" tool.

http://www.jewelerstoystore.com/Economy_Flex_Shaft_p/f530.htm

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Brad, by "etching out the eyes", do you mean drillin' an eye socket? If so, this is what I need.

Yes sir, the bits that come with it are great for that, but like 152nd says the rpm's are fast, and it takes a very light touch to etch them out. It's also great for reshaping the eyes themselves for custom looks also.

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I have the rechargable Dremel that I like very much. Nice not having to deal with the cord. Musky Glenn

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I don't have good experience with those cheap versions operating on low 12V or 24V current , one can sometimes even hold their working spindle by hand , ........the versions working on ordinary household current 220V have much more power .

greetz , diemai :yay:

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Diemai, I had forgotten that a lot of countries use 220 volt for house hold current. We only use 220 for larger appliances like water heaters, clothes dryers, air conditioners etc. Most of our house (in USA) is 110 volt for outlets, lights, etc. Sorry to hijack this post. I recently used my rechargable Dremel to grind out two pieces of alum. to make a mold for pouring lead for my ice jig mold. Similar to Rapala ice jig. It did well for this application. Musky Glenn

Edited by Musky Glenn

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I picked up the dremel rechargeble for $40.00 and its all I use for eyes and detailing been pretty happy with it lo and High speed is nice to have. And I have a nock off with full variable speed 110v that I haven't used much but works really well, I just like the no cord for me and it is very light.

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Diemai, I had forgotten that a lot of countries use 220 volt for house hold current. We only use 220 for larger appliances like water heaters, clothes dryers, air conditioners etc. Most of our house (in USA) is 110 volt for outlets, lights, etc. Sorry to hijack this post. I recently used my rechargable Dremel to grind out two pieces of alum. to make a mold for pouring lead for my ice jig mold. Similar to Rapala ice jig. It did well for this application. Musky Glenn

Thanks for pointing out , ......but I guess , that it really does not matter , whether a genuine "Dremel" runs on 110V in the US or on 220V in Europe or even is a rechargeable one , ....I was just refering to those cheap knock-offs from supermarket sales , ........these are really crap as they're not powerful at all .

greetz , diemai :yay:

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Thanks for the input, guys.

I found a cordless, rechargeable, variable speed Dremel at the local Sears. Cordless sounds nice and the variable speed is a must for me. :) I certainly don't have a problem with a KO, but, I would steer clear of a cordless KO, as diemai said.

Edited by saltshaker

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I've been using Dremels as my main tool for making crankbaits for 10 yrs. My mainstay has been the least expensive 2 speed model. It comes with a 3 yr warranty and Dremel, which is a division of Porter Tools, offers excellent warranty service. I disassemble it and blow out the wood dust about once a year. The only thing that ever broke is the slide switch. An email to Dremel and a rebuilt unit arrived within 3 days. Not too shabby! I also have a much more expensive Foredom rotary tool that has more power and accepts attachments with up to 1/4" dia shafts. But the Dremel is so handy that I still use it 90% of the time.

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I settled on a Dremel 10.8V Cordless unit that comes with 40 accessories. I also ordered a 110 pc. accessory kit, so, I should be in good shape once I learn what purpose everything serves. :yay:

Thanks again for your input.

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this is a attackment for the dremel....might want to check it out....works greatr00301v3.jpg

Edited by Double Trouble Lures

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Do you have to have the router table to use a router bit with a Dremel? Thought maybe you could just free-hand.

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I use the $7.99 one from harbor freight as pictured earlier(got it on sale for 4 bucks) It "gets the job done", but not much more. Works good for smaller baits, but the motor is not so powerful so i would not recommend it for musky baits. This replaced an original "old school" single speed dremel (which i tossed after getting sick of replacing the electrical contact springs").

In summary great tool for the $, but it aint no dremel.

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this is a attackment for the dremel....might want to check it out....works greatr00301v3.jpg

What is the benefit of this tool? I am guessing it is just smaller, and easier to use on small baits? Rob

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What is the benefit of this tool? I am guessing it is just smaller, and easier to use on small baits? Rob

This flexible drive shaft is just easier to handle , as it's handle portion is only about as large as a marker felt pen , ........in particular very handy for furnishing fine engravings and other finacky work , as one does not have to guide the whole tool , .....would surely be of advantage on small baits as well .

greetz , diemai :yay:

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The largest Dremel round-over bit is only 1/8" which is too little to make any difference when rounding over a crankbait, IMO. In a "buying fit", I got the Dremel bit and router table, used it once and got rid of it. A couple of passes with a sanding cylinder does the same amount of work - don't waste your $$. Besides, most of us just don't feel safe trying to run a 20,000 rpm razor sharp router bit over a piece of 2 1/2" x 1" wood used for a bass crankbait.

Flex shafts, etc: my Foredom rotary tool has a flex shaft as a basic part of the tool but I've never used one with the small Dremels. Depending on which model Dremel you choose, it could be an advantage or not. A lot depends on your experience and how you like to use the tool. One recommendation I have for Dremels is not to limit yourself to only Dremel bits. It will accept any bit with a 1/8" or smaller shank diameter, including toothed wood carving burrs, millimeter drill bits, etc from other manufacturers. All you need to use them is a set of Dremel collets so you can fit smaller shank tools into the Dremel.

Edited by BobP

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This flexible drive shaft is just easier to handle , as it's handle portion is only about as large as a marker felt pen , ........in particular very handy for furnishing fine engravings and other finacky work , as one does not have to guide the whole tool , .....would surely be of advantage on small baits as well .

greetz , diemai :yay:

I used the flexible shaft Foredom for several years making jewelry. What I like about it, is the variable speed pedal.

Also, there are many, many different types of bits that are available to use/modify for your dremel. Just do a search for jewelry supplies.

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I'll have about 100 accessories for my Dremel, so, maybe I'll have some stuff to do what I need. My luck 90% will be for buffin'. :unsure:

Edited by saltshaker

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I bought the Dremel Keyless Chuck so I could use the small "letter" size drill bits in my Dremel. It's not only much easier and quicker to change tools and bits, but has proven invaluable with a much greater range of tools that that can be used.

Ben

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Im with you on that BobP I tried using a 3/4 hp. router/table for rounding over some big lures. I tried white pine and had the blank grab and explode into my face. I then tried an oak blank and found out it just hurts more when you get hit with it. Had a few get sucked in to.....I like my fingers to much to continue down that path.

IMO the best thing I have ever purchased to build lures was a 1" X 30" Belt/5" Disk combo. Cost me about $60. I dont even precut my blanks anymore. I use the disk to shape them and then tilt the table to 45 degrees and run it on the edges. If I have any compound shapes I use the belt. I do the final rounding with a rotary tool (B and D) with a little sanding wheel. Final cleanup with fine sandpaper by hand. Takes about 20 minutes from start to finish and it is ready to seal. I lose alot of lures so I have gotten pretty fast at making them...LOL

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