MaxRV

Painting Order?

13 posts in this topic

Hello,

I am brand new to airbrushing, and I have watched a ton of airbrushing videos, however I still cannot conceptualize if there is a specific order to applying paint when airbrushing fishing lures. Any tips would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,

MaxRV

Woodbridge, VA

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Hello,

I am brand new to airbrushing, and I have watched a ton of airbrushing videos, however I still cannot conceptualize if there is a specific order to applying paint when airbrushing fishing lures. Any tips would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,

MaxRV

Woodbridge, VA

Not to hijack, but could you link me to some of these videos and tutorials? I'm not too good at searching apparently.

Thanks,

J

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MaxRV,

Welcome to TU! I hope that you'll enjoy your stay here.

I would suggest that you look at some crankbaits here in the gallery, on the web , and in your tacklebox. Look at them close and you will see what color goes on first, second, and so on. Different orders of colors will give you different effects and also different color shades. Gold, for example looks quite different over a light color than it does over a dark one. Just start painting. You'll soon learn what colors to apply to get the effects that you're looking for. Besides, you might just come up with a killer new color pattern.

Gene

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If you're just starting out, a good beginner pattern is shoot a solid color basecoat (often white), then shoot an "all-over" color like pearl white or neon yellow, then do the shoulders and back with a darker color, then add accent colors if desired on the throat and belly. Dark solid colors will totally cover lighter solid colors. Like Gene suggests, there are no hard and fast rules and you will discover variations and refinements as you go along, especially using stencils and layering paints to get blended effects that seem more natural.

Retrobass, on TU, we're more about building and showing airbrushing results than learning how to airbrush. Google airbrushing for numerous sites dedicated to the art of airbrushing and go to YouTube and do the same search for loads of video tutorials on the subject.

Edited by BobP

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My two cents: If you don't have a "bone pile", it's time to start one. There is no substitute for experience. Try anything and everything on some old lures. If something works well, give it a go on a good plug when you're ready. If it doesn't work, wash it off and try again, or throw it in the pile for another day. Lincoya and BobP give good advice...there are so many variations and ways to achieve different looks. Find a recipe in the hard-bait cookbook (a good source for what colors to use in somewhat of an order) that interests you and give it it a try until you develop some confidence in the process.

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Thank you for all of the advice. Today I made a first attempt at a shad pattern (attached). Obviously, I have some control issues with my dots, stenciling, and paint thickness. I quickly learned that the stencil material I was using was way too think, and did not allow for me to create clean edges. I plan to sand these down tomorrow and make a second run at them. I will upload some more examples as I advance.

Thank you again,

MaxRV

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Sand down? Are you using water based paints? If so, just a good scrub brush and warm, soapy water at the kitchen sink and you're ready to repaint in no time.

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A good reference is the Wasco fish taxidermy manual. Painting a fish and a bait that catches fish are very similar. I don't think you need every single color used in taxidermy, but it will give you a good idea where to start.

But the biggest cheat sheet of all is to look at a lot of other peoples work. 99% of what you see was copied from another painter. Some may copy color for color and some may add their own little variation. And ALWAYS cheat when you can, ie; use tape, stencils, combs, bottle caps, lufas, panty hose, hair nets, or whatever to make it easier.

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Gunnie, first time I hear anyone mention this as a reference. just visited the site and looks like it will be a nice add. I am putting on my birthday wish list. Thank you!

Edited by littleriver

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Welcome to TU Max!! Your first baits are looking good. A little tip for your dots, The closer you hold the stencil to the bait, the cleaner your edges will be. The more you move the stencil away from the bait, the softer the edges will be.

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Welcome to TU Max!! Your first baits are looking good. A little tip for your dots, The closer you hold the stencil to the bait, the cleaner your edges will be. The more you move the stencil away from the bait, the softer the edges will be.

Big Bass Man,

Thank you for the Tip. I was having trouble also with the stiffness of the material I was using. I think I need to look for a lighter material that will form better to the bait. Attached is my second attempt. On this one I used two different size nails to make a large yellow circle, and then a smaller pupil. I think this will work until I get a bit better at using stencils.

As for the bait, It was certainly easier than the first, especially with all the tips I have received from the members. Once I clear coat this one, I think it might actually catch fish.

Thanks Again,

MaxRV

2nd attempt.jpg

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2nd attempt.jpg

2nd attempt.jpg

2nd attempt.jpg

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A good reference is the Wasco fish taxidermy manual. Painting a fish and a bait that catches fish are very similar. I don't think you need every single color used in taxidermy, but it will give you a good idea where to start.

But the biggest cheat sheet of all is to look at a lot of other peoples work. 99% of what you see was copied from another painter. Some may copy color for color and some may add their own little variation. And ALWAYS cheat when you can, ie; use tape, stencils, combs, bottle caps, lufas, panty hose, hair nets, or whatever to make it easier.

Thank you Gunnie! That is an awesome resource!

MaxRV

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