Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
crankpaint

Glow In The Dark Paint

11 posts in this topic

Just found some of this glow in the dark paint,its a water based gel type paint,I've reduced it with future based reducer and it sprays well but it need about 4 to 6 coat to get it to glow on the paint,glow.jpg so im testing it a little more to see if i can get it to take less coats of paint

glow.jpg

glow.jpg

glow.jpg

glow.jpg

glow.jpg

glow.jpg

glow.jpg

post-27478-0-57409400-1325471051_thumb.jpg

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have some acrylic base glow paint that I got from: http://www.glonation.com/

Mine has glow grains that are too large to pass through an airbrush so I brush it on lures (especially jigging spoons) in several heavy coats, then topcoat with Dick Nite urethane. You can darn near read a newspaper by the light this stuff puts off. The glow is produced by charging the paint's glow grains with UV light. Even on cloudy days, there's plenty of UV to get the job done. The length of the glow varies according to the color of the glow paint - white lasts for up to 12 hours, other colors for less time. The manufacturer warns against thinning. It comes as a gel with the grains dispersed in it. If you thin it much, the grains will fall out of the paint. Also, you cannot mix glow paint with other paint since the grains will be covered and the glow will be hidden.

I have compared the glow from a spoon coated with heavy coats of acrylic glow paint to a factory-built Cabelas glow spoon which was undoubtedly spray painted. The home-painted spoon shines like a beacon in a dark room while you can just see a faint glow from the edges of the Cabelas spoon. I can't say if the bass always prefer the brighter spoon - they aren't talking - but I catch lots of largemouth, white bass, and stripers as deep as 55 ft on hand painted glow spoons. If you want it "in their face", the hand painted spoons certainly "shine" (pun intended). The more numerous and larger the glow grains are in the paint, the more glow you will get.

Edited by BobP
2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have some acrylic base glow paint that I got from: http://www.glonation.com/

Mine has glow grains that are too large to pass through an airbrush so I brush it on lures (especially jigging spoons) in several heavy coats, then topcoat with Dick Nite urethane. You can darn near read a newspaper by the light this stuff puts off. The glow is produced by charging the paint's glow grains with UV light. Even on cloudy days, there's plenty of UV to get the job done. The length of the glow varies according to the color of the glow paint - white lasts for up to 12 hours, other colors for less time. The manufacturer warns against thinning. It comes as a gel with the grains dispersed in it. If you thin it much, the grains will fall out of the paint. Also, you cannot mix glow paint with other paint since the grains will be covered and the glow will be hidden.

I have compared the glow from a spoon coated with heavy coats of acrylic glow paint to a factory-built Cabelas glow spoon which was undoubtedly spray painted. The home-painted spoon shines like a beacon in a dark room while you can just see a faint glow from the edges of the Cabelas spoon. I can't say if the bass always prefer the brighter spoon - they aren't talking - but I catch lots of largemouth, white bass, and stripers as deep as 55 ft on hand painted glow spoons. If you want it "in their face", the hand painted spoons certainly "shine" (pun intended). The more numerous and larger the glow grains are in the paint, the more glow you will get.

Bob, I would think that any clear coat would block the charging capabilities of the glow paint, as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I noticed on the site Bob gave they also have glow powder. It says you can mix the powder with clear mediums such as polyurethanes and epoxies. I've never used glow paints before but always been curious to try some out. I like that site.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I noticed on the site Bob gave they also have glow powder. It says you can mix the powder with clear mediums such as polyurethanes and epoxies. I've never used glow paints before but always been curious to try some out. I like that site.

I, too, have been wanting to try the glow paints. I have some questions, so, I think I'll give them a call tomorrow. Thanks to Bob for linkin' us up with that info.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i bought some of the uvglow base wicked paint and was not pleased with it at all - got little to no clow out of it after a day in the sun or under a blacklight - so beware of it and steer away

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SS, since UV light will penetrate clearcoat, the glow grains will charge nicely underneath it. Maybe if your clearcoat has UV filters, as some epoxies do, it could be a problem. My spoons charge up just fine under ambient daylight (even on a cloudy day) and a topcoat of Dick Nite moisture cured urethane. BTW, the Glonation site has a link to a lure company that uses their glow powder in soft plastics.

I'm not sure I would use the large-grained Glonation paint on a regular crankbait since you can't spray it and the paint job would look pretty ugly. But I painted a lipless crankbait with the stuff and it turned out OK - a solid white lipless crank with an eye popping greenish-white glow in deep water. I guess there's always a fly in any ointment: the bigger the glow grains, the stronger the glow - but you can't shoot large grains through an airbrush (at least not the airbrushes I use).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SS, since UV light will penetrate clearcoat, the glow grains will charge nicely underneath it. Maybe if your clearcoat has UV filters, as some epoxies do, it could be a problem. My spoons charge up just fine under ambient daylight (even on a cloudy day) and a topcoat of Dick Nite moisture cured urethane. BTW, the Glonation site has a link to a lure company that uses their glow powder in soft plastics.

I'm not sure I would use the large-grained Glonation paint on a regular crankbait since you can't spray it and the paint job would look pretty ugly. But I painted a lipless crankbait with the stuff and it turned out OK - a solid white lipless crank with an eye popping greenish-white glow in deep water. I guess there's always a fly in any ointment: the bigger the glow grains, the stronger the glow - but you can't shoot large grains through an airbrush (at least not the airbrushes I use).

Thanks, Bob. I phoned the people but they were closed today. What about auto clears? You think they would block the charging process?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i've used the Glo Nation powder on some swimbaits. glows like a neon light! what i did was to spray the bait with clear polyurathane, dump the powder on, shake off the excess and let dry. i then sprayed with poly again to lock the powder and then epoxy coated it.

th_IMG_1973.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think any topcoat will do unless it states that it contains UV filtering agents. Even then I doubt the filters will block enough UV to inhibit charging the grains, but I'm not a paint chemist.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i've used the Glo Nation powder on some swimbaits. glows like a neon light! what i did was to spray the bait with clear polyurathane, dump the powder on, shake off the excess and let dry. i then sprayed with poly again to lock the powder and then epoxy coated it.

th_IMG_1973.jpg

John, your work is amazing. Especially the snakes.....they are just a little too lifelike to suit me. :) Great work.

Thanks for the glow paint info.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0