largemouthlad

Looking At Airbrush Systems

42 posts in this topic

I used a tankless airbrush compressor for several years and it worked OK but there are advantages to a more powerful compressor with an air tank, if your painting environment is OK with the noise and the size. Tool compressors are cheaper per PSI, develop higher pressure, turn on less often, and the air tank buffers the air supply to your airbrush to eliminate the pulsing that small "instant ON" airbrush compressors tend to have. The bigger the compressor and its air tank, the less often it will run. Right now, I'm using a Porter Cable 2hp 135 psi compressor with a 6 gallon air tank, which I "liberated" from one of my sons. I added a pressure regulator and a moisture trap (about $40 total). It sits comfortably under the work bench where I paint crankbaits. You have to decide where you will paint, how much equipment will fit the space, how much noise is too much, and how much you want to spend for your setup. IMO, at the minimum, you want a compressor that is rated for 60 psi max pressure. This will run an airbrush at a sustained pressure of around 45 psi, which is the maximum pressure that most of us ever use (actually, most of us shoot at lower pressures than that, 10-35 psi, but you want more pressure there when you need it).

Also JMHO, the sweet spot for airbrushes is one with a tip diameter of .3 to .35mm. If you use only one airbrush, that tip size will shoot just about any airbrush paint and do a good job of it. Some airbrush companies like Badger or Paasche don't state their tip sizes. If you want to use one of their models, simply know that their tips are typically larger than those found on airbrushes from the Far East, of which Iwata is the best known. Personally, I use an Iwata Revolution B with a .3mm tip and it would be my choice if I were going to use one airbrush. It sells for around $75, which I feel is a bargain price for such a high quality airbrush.

Edited by BobP
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http://www.pecogloba...p/wd%20130e.htm

I'm assuming tuna's airbrush is Chinese manufacture. JMHO, before buying any airbrush, I want to know how to get replacement parts when (not if) I do something stupid and bend the needle or split the nozzle. Major Japanese, Euro, and U.S. manufacturers have reliable parts sources here in the U.S. That has been much less certain with the Chinese brands. Not saying this is true of the 130E, but I'd want some reassurance before I bought one.

Edited by BobP

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http://www.harborfreight.com/1-5-hp-58-psi-compressor-and-airbrush-kit-95630.html

If you get an "airbrush" compressor like the one pictured above you do not need a tank.

Here is one that is similar. I use the same one every day and it works great. It comes with an airbrush as well. I don't use this airbrush but allot of people do and like it. Hard to beat the price.

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I would venture to say 98 % are Chinese manufacturers if not all . I'll worry about parts later if I need .I would be more worried about a compressor taking a crap. Not much to break on a air gun. I bought some good air brush paint.It rocks

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ok sweet so the ones with tanks you can build up pressure and turn them off and your airbrush will be good for a few minutes and the ones with out have to be on when ever you are using the brush i assume....

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yup, If I was sitting next to one all day it would be annoying. The little ones are quite and I only turn them on while I'm spraying which for me is not long.

The smaller compressor doesn't seem to push the plain art store paint near as easily as good creatax airbrush paint. There is to much fall off in pressure. This is what I have. For the extra few bucks buy the good paint . After you learn how to tweak it ,go nuts. I'm going to try to shoot a top coat also. You will probably hear me swear at your house

ABD-TC-18_a_200w.jpg Im spraying real small stuff, Ice jigs. Came with a 6 foot hose.

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Here is my stuff.Works great.I bought it and went at it. Good basic start . I have a little over 100 dollars into it. Compressor was 55.00 airbrush 17.00 and colors were 40 or so with S/H. Where can you have this much fun for 100 dollars. Keep it clean..... :nuhuh:

IcejigsGiveaway250.jpg

IcejigsGiveaway252.jpg

IcejigsGiveaway251.jpg

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This is how fine it paints. This is a size 12 firetiger mousie jig I did. Don't know the weight but it is VERY VERY tiny. the tip is .5. Going to buy a smaller one to do some detail work.

jig007.jpg

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jig001.jpg

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What Double Trouble is telling you is right on the money. A gravity fed air brush will give you less trouble. The Iwata air brush and the Silver Jet compressor is the exact same thing that I use. If you cannot paint a professional looking lure with that set up then you just need to practice. He is also right about loud compressors. Once the thing is full and quiet you can spray just fine. But when the pressure runs low and that thing kicks on it will scare the life out of you. Air brush compressors are quiet. That's a good thing. All of them will work just fine. You will have to get an air guage for any compressor that you use except for ones that are made for air brushes. They usually come with one built in. That will tell you how much PSI you are shooting. The whole secret to good paint jobs is a good air brush, good paint that is thinned properly, and patience. Bob P, as always, is right about parts. Get a quality air brush and you will enjoy painting lures a lot more.

Skeeter

Edited by Skeeter

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