SLTFP

My Crank Bait Lip Angle Question

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Hi everyone I am new here names Jeff, my question was the same as Crazyju. He asked about Lip Angles as well. My question is if there is key or something besides looking at a store bought jig to set the angle on a lure? If not maybe I can help yall out and get to researching this subject and post a tutorial once I test try it out, lol. I love the forum guys thanks for the great info through out the site too an awesome nd helpful tool this is for anyone building baits.

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I draw an imaginary line from the point of the nose to the tail, then measure the down angle from the rear point of the lip slot. You always want to cut the slot just after cutting out the basic lure blank, so you'll be cutting it at a square 90 degree angle to the sides of the bait. Another thing about lip angle: the actual angle as the bait swims is what counts, and it is the one you cut into the bait PLUS any additional angle caused by the lure swimming nose-down. Bottom line, everything affects everthing else and that complicates things. You can say "lip angle X" will tend to perform a certain way compared to "lip angle Y" on the same bait, but I think that's about the extent of it.

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Thank you for the reply reply Bobp just got done making my lure shape on the fly. I use Sculpey for all the lures I make. This will be the first hard bait I have ever made I have several other designs but have yet to go into the molding process as of yet. This forum sofar has been a great help and inspiration for to me. Thanks again.

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@Diemai I was just looking on there too must have missed that page. Before I found this forum I had visited there when I started to get interested in building a hard bait. It wasn't till I seen a decal lure that I really got interested in making a hard bait cause I cant airbrush worth a damn. Hopefully this first lure comes out good. I know people hardly hit it right on the head the first time. But I myself have found that my first guess is usually the right one. Thanks for the info and look forward to hearing more as time goes on.

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Well i have tested 22 baits since i asked the question. Like others said i am sure it will be different for every bait, but 6 degrees to 21 seems to be the sweet spot. All the ones in that range run really good. None less thas 6 would run at all and it was hit or miss about 21 to 26. I am using a cnc machine so this angle is dead on.

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I should note these are bill tied, so tying directly to the bait would change things and you could go to a lot steeper angle.

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The bill angle can be anywhere from 0 to 90 degrees(or more). The shape of the body, amount and distribution of ballast, type of wood, desired running depth and action, and many other factors will help you determine what this angle is as well as the shape and size of the bill. I'll bite. :)

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You must also consider the tow eye position. This is critical and moves around when you change anything on the lip geometry. The two are integral.

Dave

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When I suggested looking at successful commercial lures, it was not only to see what angle the lip sits at, it was also to do a float test to see how to ballast them. Seeing how a lure sits in the water says a lot about how it's weighted, and what angle of attack it needs initially to perform.

All deep diving floaters sit nose down at rest. Aside from esthetics, having the flat, 0 degree lip already pointed down lets the lure begin to dive immediately, and allows the 0 degree lip angle to work.

Shallow lures typically float horizontal, since their lips are at 45+- degrees, and dig into the water without any help from the atitude of the lure. A lure with a 0 degree lip angle that sits horizontal (level) would struggle to dive, because the lip isn't catching enough water to initiate the dive.

In lures with movable ballast, to aid in casting, the diving lures have a system that's oriented from low in the belly to high in the tail, so the ballast moves to the tail on the cast, and then drops back down to the belly, lowering the nose and lip, once it lands.

Edited by mark poulson

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