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Painting Basecoat Question. Quick!

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#1 Hehhna



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Posted 30 January 2012 - 07:23 PM

Hey guys. I am finally going to finish my lure. I need some help getting started. How do people get the scale affect on their lures? I know they use a mesh of somesort, but what color do they paint under that BEFORE they spray the mesh? Im getting close to the end of my first lure!

#2 Mayberry_Baits



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Posted 30 January 2012 - 08:40 PM

Basically you just want contrasting colors. Black base light colored scales, white base dark and bright colored scales. Do a search on "painting scales" and there is lots of info. Here is just one link for example: http://www.tackleund...__1#entry152361

#3 RayburnGuy


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Posted 30 January 2012 - 08:52 PM

I think there's a tutorial in the "Hardbait How To" forum that shows you how to paint scales.


#4 mark poulson

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 08:55 AM

You can use the plastic mesh from garlic and avacado bags, or any other plastic mesh. You can also use "tule", the mesh fabric that's used on bridal gowns.
You can use minnow net mesh, or even fiberglass drywall tape, which is self-adhesive.
The key with using mesh is getting it tight to the bait before you paint, and heat setting multiple thin coats of color instead of one thick coat.
Depending on what kind of paint scheme you're looking for, you can paint the lure with a highlight-type undercoat, like a light violet for crappie schemes, and then put the mesh over the lure and shoot you main scale color over that.
As you paint more, you'll find you can blend different base undercoat colors, and different scale colors, since both fish andcrawdads are lighter colored on the belly, and darker on the back. Blending, or shading, can really create some neat looking effects.
Check out some of the paint schemes in the Hard Baits gallery, and you'll see what I'm talking about.
And don't get discouraged if you don't paint the Mona Lisa right off the bat.
I am no artist with an airbrush, and when I first came to TU, and saw what the folks here could produce, I went out and burned down my paint shop!

Edited by mark poulson, 01 February 2012 - 08:57 AM.