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miket

Dry Time On Devcon 2 Ton 30 Minute Epoxy

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How much dry time do I need to allow for before applying a second coat of DT2Ton 30 minute epoxy? Thanks....Mike

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If I second coat, I'll wait until the first is totally dry. I've screwed up the first coat by not waiting. Sometimes the first coat will "move" while adding the 2nd coat.

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Just curious...why a second coat? I have, on rare occasion, second coated with D2T, but it's usually not necessary. When I do, however, I definitely wait until fully cured (min. 24 hrs). Then I like to scuff with pad or light sand paper to ensure better adhesion.

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D2T doesn't "dry" - it cures, so recoating doesn't affect hardening of the first coat. It's usually 'finger proof' after about 5 hrs, so I agree with BBM. I read about epoxy tests on rod guides that said a microscopic exam of double coated guides could find no evidence of a line separating the first and second coat, indicating that the two coats were fully integrated into a single mass as long as the recoating was done within 24-36 hrs. From that, I would say that there's no need to scuff or sand recently applied epoxy before you apply a second coat.

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Just curious...why a second coat? I have, on rare occasion, second coated with D2T, but it's usually not necessary. When I do, however, I definitely wait until fully cured (min. 24 hrs). Then I like to scuff with pad or light sand paper to ensure better adhesion.

The first coat is not even with areas where the coating is extremely thin or missing...contamination from hands? not enough epoxy? improper mixing... would appreciate some advice. Thanks....Mike

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The answer is.....

D: could be one or all of the above.

What I have done to virtually eliminate this (other than improper mixing) is to spray the lure with something like a transparent color (i can't divulge my secret sauce). This will cover any oils that might have come off your hands while painting. Loading up the brush and letting the clear coat "flow" helps alot as opposed to "pulling" the clear coat. Just what seems to work for me.

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The first coat is not even with areas where the coating is extremely thin or missing...contamination from hands? not enough epoxy? improper mixing... would appreciate some advice. Thanks....Mike

I had the problem of thin coating because of uneven brush pressure. Epoxy was mixed properly ( I don't think you can over mix ) some bubbles but they dispersed once I started coating the bait. I use an old sable artists brush for coating. As far as contamination from hands, I try not to handle the bait to much, only by the bill even when putting on the eyes prior to coating.

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