RiverMan

Rotisserie Motors Fast Enough?

11 posts in this topic

Another drying motor bites the dust! I paid more than $100 for this variable speed gearmotor and it only lasted a few years.

I am drying 25 lures at a time and need something that will hold up.

Are the rotisserie motors fast enough for epoxy?

Thanks....

Jed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They are plenty fast enough for Devcon 2 ton......I just hang my baits as I get them topcoated on a hanger with paper clips attached. As I get another one coated I turn all previous coated lures from the lip eye to the tail eye and vice versa. Once I get them all coated I keep changing them every 5 minutes or so for about 30 minutes. They are stiff enough to not have to worry about after that. No motor....no turning other than the manual turning.

Won't work for lipless cranks or nose tie cranks as well....but as long as you're careful should still work.

I know this isn't the excepted way of curing epoxy....but I do most things out of the ordinary and still get the same results most of the time. It's just what works in my shop.

THIS METHOD WILL NOT WORK FOR THIN EPOXIES! Just works with Devcon 2t in my shop.

Good Luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My old DQ (that's Dairy Queen) rotisserie was over 30 years old. I used it for about 3 years after it sat in storage for years...it died on me last month; it ran about 5 rpms. Bought the Lowe's model ($25) and is working fine. It is slower - just about 2 rpms - but fast enough for what I do. Forgot to turn it off one night last week and it ran for probably 24 hrs. - not even hot. So far, so good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

go to the junk yard and take a turn table motor out of a old microwave they charged me about two bucks the turn about six rpm but be sure to get one that says 110-120 volts

I came across one that said 26.something volts that didn't work very well on regular voltage

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another drying motor bites the dust! I paid more than $100 for this variable speed gearmotor and it only lasted a few years.

I am drying 25 lures at a time and need something that will hold up.

Are the rotisserie motors fast enough for epoxy?

Thanks....

Jed

Yes.....I usually run mine from about 10-11am til about 8pm every 3 days. I've done this for about a year. I have it set up for 20 lures. A roast weighs quite a bit more! I use BSI 30 Min Slow Cure Epoxy. I use dowels w/clothespins stuck right in the motor so it is right on the centerline. I believe it is 3rpm Works great!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

go to the junk yard and take a turn table motor out of a old microwave they charged me about two bucks the turn about six rpm but be sure to get one that says 110-120 volts

I came across one that said 26.something volts that didn't work very well on regular voltage

Just a tip I should have said earlier about the microwave turntable motor is you don't want to put wieght on the motor itself you just want the motor to do the turning I rest the shaft on bearings but a v block would work make a connection to the shaft with some flexible tubing I believe this would make the rotisserie motors last longer too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Everyone is talking about DT2, who does Etex with a turner and how is it working for you. My problem is the the edges on a jerk bait with Etex. I don't want to round off the corners more than I do now. Any suggestions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Raven, epoxy always draws away from sharp edges as it cures and makes the coating very thin in those areas. I've never heard of any brand or technique that will avoid that, so it's just the nature of the beast. If sharp edges are unavoidable, you need a different topcoat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BoBP

Will DT2 do a better job on edges. Does brushing do a better job on the edges. I pour and hang my lures.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always use D2T and it thins out at edges like all epoxies. If you want to stick with epoxy, I think the only thing to do is go to multiple coats. Of course, the edge will eventually disappear as you bury it in successive coats of epoxy, so that might not be what you want!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now