VersatileFuturian

Grooved Bandits

17 posts in this topic

There are guys in Tennessee putting virtical grooves on the sides of their bandit crankbaits. I tried it with a dremel and it does give the crankbait a completely different sound and shake but my grooves do not line up very well. Does anyone have any suggestions or know how other guys are doing it? Thanks

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I have seen those on e-bay. They are pretty neat looking. I'm sure it will take some practice because I have seen them on and off for over a year. Maybe a dremel is not the tool to use. Other than asking them how it's done......maybe try making a template and then use a marker. Are you making the cuts and then painting?

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Rick Clunn came out with a crankbait series a while back that had grooves, to "change it's hydrodynamic signature".

I would worry about weaking a plastic bait by grooving it.

Maybe you could just add vertical ribs with either clear silicone or epoxy, or even hot glue.

Or, dare I say it, nail polish.

Just a thought.

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Rick Clunn came out with a crankbait series a while back that had grooves, to "change it's hydrodynamic signature".

I would worry about weaking a plastic bait by grooving it.

Maybe you could just add vertical ribs with either clear silicone or epoxy, or even hot glue.

Or, dare I say it, nail polish.

Just a thought.

Those baits came from a design from a guy in Ten. Back around the late 90's Rex Pendergrass was doing this for me in 1998 and he was doing them in bandits and bombers as they have the best plastic for this. I have over 20the baits done this way. I can't aware that's where the orions came from but Rex was the only one

I knew was doing this. He has a jig made for this.

Jeff

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I do not have any pics of them right now, there were a few on ebay a month agofor about $12. They looked really good. After doing some google searches, I've heard guys saying they use a dremel and some say they heat metal rods and melt the grooves in. I'm going to try making a template to help me line everything up. I also thought that maybe heating up a fork and melting the grooves in all at once on each side could work. Oh, and I lightly sand the paint off before making the grooves, then I plan to re-paint them. Keep the suggestions coming. Thanks everyone.

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I found one. There is a good back and belly shot to show the grooves if you scroll down on the pictures. This one sort of looks like a reverse sweet beaver. I have seen some others that this guy makes and they are more just virtical grooves. http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-BANDIT-300-CUSTOM-PAINTED-GROOVED-CTs-Modified-Crankbait-Lure-Black-BL-/200700292823?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2ebaab6ed7

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VersatileFuturian,

The "grooves" in the bait you showed look pretty deep. They must be magicians, to be able to do it to a hollow plastic lure. I think that would be easier with a wood or solid lure, as opposed to a hollow plastic lure, to allow that much material to be removed safely. I'm sure I'd plunge right through the sides of a plastic lure if I tried it.

If you have a wood, resin, or PCV lure I'm sure you could do that with a dremel mounted sanding drum. Or hand carve them.

It's a neat looking effect.

Edited by mark poulson

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Looks to me like a file might have been used. Just mark out your guide lines and have at it. I know there's no way I could do that with a power tool.

Ben

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You can lay the lines out with narrow pin striping tape going from the belly across the back and to the belly on the other side ... or cut a piece of paper in a scallop shape that goes across the bait - belly across the back and belly .Then mark the lines.. Then cut the grooves with a dremmel and whittle the cut back out with a good sharp knife and smoothe with a sanding sponge.

But at 14 dollors buy it now... this guy must have figured out a much easier and efficient way to do them. Heck, I charge 14 dollors to paint one.

Regards,

Blades

Edited by bladesandbaits
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Hey Guys

Greetings from East TN...

The grooves were indeed cut into the side of the lure, using dremel-type tools. Rex Pendergass and Moe Simmerly were doing lots of them at 1 time. The lures were know as "Ripplers" Some of them made it to Clunn when Mega-Bucks was at Douglas Lake and shortly thereafter, the Orion came out. Coincidence?? maybe?

Anyway, lots of people still use them, not many talk about them

And yes, It is easy to cut right thru the side of the lure if you are not careful : )

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Thanks for the heads up Shopcat. If I were to try that with a Dremel I can promise you my reject pile would be much, much bigger than the good lure pile.

Ben

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Thank you guys for all the replies. I'm going to give it a try when I get time. There is really a lot more plastic there than you think. I wouldn't try it with a speed trap but a bandit has pretty thick walls. I think guys are doing it with Bomber and Norman crankbaits as well. If I can make one halfway decent I'll post a pic. I'm not much of a painter though.

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