tommy69z

Paint Question

18 posts in this topic

I have searched and not found the answer I'm looking for...I have bought the createx paints for airbrushing, but was wondering about acrylic craft paint? Is says water based, just wondering if it is usable in the airbrush? Can the cheaper acrylics be used, say like white, for a base and then the createx used over it? Sorry for the newbie question...I'm a greenhorn airbrusher....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, but you will probabley have to thin them to shoot through the airbrush. i have had no problems with the Americana brand of paints.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing that helps me sort through which paints will work for air brushing is to remember that Createx, and the other hobby paints I use, are, first and foremost, T shirt paints that can be heat set after they're sprayed, to make them water proof. If you google T shirt paints you'll probably find the technical explanation, but, long story short, the paint forms long chain molecules when it's heated above a certain temperature, and that makes it waterproof, so clothing can be washed without the paint coming off.

I also test the hobby paints, like Apple Barrel, to see if they are thin enough to spray. Most of the time I have to thin them, and I use the Createx 4011 reducer to do that, because it allows the paint to still be strong when thinned.

If you're just starting out, I'd recommend you stick with Createx until you get your legs under you. Although the small bottles seem very expensive, you'll use so little paint for each bait that it's not that bad, and you'll learn to paint with paint that's designed for the air brush.

Solid, opaque paints are thicker, and so are pearls, and you will want to thin them before painting.

Transparents are thinner to begin with.

Try to achieve the consistency of skim milk when you're thinning, and do multiple thin coats, instead of one thick one. It's critical to heat set each coat before you apply another, so water and uncured paint isn't trapped under another cured coat when it can cause problems later.

I use a hair dryer, first on low, and then on high, to heat set my paint. The low setting dries the paint, and the high setting cures it.

Last, have a bowl of clean water handy, and learn to quickly backflush and clean your air brush between each color, so it becomes second nature.

It takes less than a minute, and is easier if you wear the throwaway nitrile gloves when you're painting, so you're not preoccupied with trying to keep you hands clean. I only wear one, on my left hand, while I'm painting (I'm right handed and hold the brush in my right hand), so I can hold the bait with my left hand and not worry about a technicolor hand.

Hope this helps, and good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I buy the large Folk Art paint at Wally World. Its 2.99 for the big bottles. I also get the clear ketchup bottles to store the paint in. I thin it down with a 60% future and 40% water reducer and hve not had any problems doing it this way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used hobby acrylics when I started with Badger and Paasche airbrushes. The hobby paints have larger paint particles and do not contain flow additives, so a particular color or brand may not work with your airbrush if it has a smaller tip size. There is no standard on particle size, so it's a crap shoot. Hobby acrylics became an instant hassle when I switched to .2mm and .3mm airbrushes - just too many frustrating clogs. I decided that you use so little paint on a crankbait that going with the more expensive airbrush paint is not really gonna break the bank anyway - and it sure makes life easier, not to mention the availability of transparent airbrush paints, etc, that let you expand your painting repertoire. To save money on paint, I buy it in 4 oz or larger bottles.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I buy the large Folk Art paint at Wally World. Its 2.99 for the big bottles. I also get the clear ketchup bottles to store the paint in. I thin it down with a 60% future and 40% water reducer and hve not had any problems doing it this way.

can you please tell me how much paint do you add to this and what is a water reducer is it distilled water

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did not mean water reducer, sorry I mix the whole bottle of paint in the clear squeeze bottle with a mixture of 60% future shine and 40% distilled water. I add the mixture to the paint until it is the consistancy of milk.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am using the folk art paint with a cheap airbrush right now. I thin it with tap water until it will drip off of my stirrer within about a second. But I'm considering the airbrush paints.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ok thanks my friend so 1 bottle (4 0unces) of paint to 60 percent of 4 ounces and 40 percent of 4 ounces correct?

Nope. The home made reducer your making is a mix of Pledge with Future floor wax and water. You can mix up however much of it you want. This mixture will be 60% Pledge with Future and 40% water. After this is mixed you then use it as a reducer to thin your paint. Most folks try to add enough reducer to their paint to get it to the consistency of skim milk.

You can find it at the grocery store or the big box retail stores. There are two kinds. One is for wood floors and one is for tile and linoleum floors. The kind you want is for the tile and linoleum floors and it will be clear in color. The kind for wood floors will have a slight brownish tint to it.

Ben

Edited by RayburnGuy
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't think we got around to answering the specific question - Yes, you can use hobby acrylic paints like Apple Barrel, etc. IF your airbrush has a large enough tip to shoot them after they are thinned with whatever (tap water, Createx 4011 Reducer, home brew Future/water, etc). I used to use Apple Barrel white for color basecoating, thinned with a little tap water (however much is needed to make it shoot OK). Apple Barrel white has lots of white pigment so does a good job of hiding whatever is underneath it. Downside: you will also get more brush clogs with any hobby acrylic paint than you will with airbrush paint. Also, dried hobby acrylics have a rougher "pebbly" surface compared to airbrush paint. How big is "big enough" for your airbrush tip when using hobby acrylics? I had no trouble shooting them through Paasche VL or Badger 170 airbrushes. Neither model states its tip diameter size, but I think they are larger than .35mm. When I switched to Iwata .2 and .3mm tipped airbrushes, hobby acrylics became "Clog City".

Look, using airbrush paints with an airbrush makes life easier and better. I order paint online in 4 oz bottles. I reorder maybe $50 worth of airbrush paint every 2 years, so the stuff lasts a long long time. Yeah, I probably pay twice as much as for hobby acrylics at Walmart but after years of using both paints, IMO saving $10-15 bucks a year just ain't worth the hassle of using hobby acrylics. And I paint better when there are fewer hassles. For color basecoating, I like using Polytranspar Superhide White. Shoots well, covers great, dries fast, and leaves a surface that is harder than most other acrylic paints.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paasche VL tip sizes (approx)

VL1.. 0.50 mm

VL3... 0.73 mm

VL5... 1.06 mm

Edited by jbaj007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ok thanks my friend so 1 bottle (4 0unces) of paint to 60 percent of 4 ounces and 40 percent of 4 ounces correct?

No! I am not sure how big the bottles of paint are. I am guessing 8 oz. I mix the future and distilled water in a plastic cup 60% furture shine and 40% distilled water. I pour all the paint into the plastic ketchup bottle then add the mixture of water/shine until it is aout like milk. I put a piece of panty hose over the top and screw the tap on. You can get future shine at Walmart and everything else to. All the paints are a bit differwnt so you kinda just estimate!
2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ty im sorry for all the trouble have a blessed day

No trouble so no need to be sorry. This is where a lot of us have learned the art of building and painting lures. I can only speak for myself, but answering questions and trying to help others is my way of paying back for what was so freely given to me. So ask anything you need to help you with your lure building and we'll try to help.

Ben

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ty im sorry for all the trouble have a blessed day

Honestly.....no trouble at all. Unfortnately I can not type on my phone, as fast as I would like too. So a lot of my posts don't translate to well when I type them. Really not a problem and best ofluck to you

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Honestly.....no trouble at all. Unfortnately I can not type on my phone, as fast as I would like too. So a lot of my posts don't translate to well when I type them. Really not a problem and best ofluck to you

I bought a bigger phone just so I could type on it, but it's still a pain!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now