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Proof Is In The Puddin


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#1 Double D

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 05:00 AM

Ok, so once a bait has been carved and it needs to be tested in the water....do I seal the bait so it doesn't absorb water. and if so, what is best to use as a sealer?

#2 littleriver

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 05:47 AM

I like to use different sealers depending on the wood to be sealed. For a balsa bait I like propionate. What are you sealing?

#3 woodieb8

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 06:07 AM

we seal with sanding sealer. rember hang your hooks and rings for testing.

#4 Double D

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 08:07 PM

I tried balsa but it was too soft...I moved to basswood and really love working with it.....haven't "graduated" to anything else at this point....love working with bass wood....sanding sealer? not real familiar with any of this other than putting the carving knife to wood at this point......never hear of propionate......am eager to take it to the next level....thank you all for your generosity with information...and you say I should test with all hardware attached?...yeah I guess that makes sense....only way to tell the true fishability...thanks again.....

#5 crankpaint

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 10:30 PM

you can get sanding sealer at home depo/lowes or the local walmart.thats what i use on all my bait that i make from poplur

#6 Double D

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 04:53 AM

thank you crankpaint...I'll stop there on my way home today.

#7 archeryrob

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 06:49 AM

The guys on StripersOnline warn people not to use that stuff. They say read the direction and it's a Cancer causing thing or something. They soak them in 60/40 Boiled Linseed/Mineral Spirits. Some do it for hours and some for 30 seconds with vigorous shaking. I just push mine under in a PVC tube for a couple of minutes. I did this too for my bay lures as the saltwater fish have more teeth and are larger and it seals the inside of the through wire hole also. I have a board with nails I let them dry for a week on before sanding to prime.

Freshwater I just seal with water base poly varnish.

#8 Sonny.Barile

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 10:07 PM

BLO has it's issues too. You are worse off breathing that stuff in. Also, it spontaneously combusts. You have to be carefull with your cleanup rags as they will suddenly go up in flames just sitting there.

#9 Double D

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 04:40 AM

What about Thompson's Water Seal?....I see that advertised on TV....or am I thinking of the wrong application....

#10 Firechief

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 10:30 AM

I use a thin coat of Devcon 2Ton

#11 mark poulson

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 11:05 AM

What about Thompson's Water Seal?....I see that advertised on TV....or am I thinking of the wrong application....


I think it has silcone, which messes with airbrush paints.

#12 Double D

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 06:19 PM

well that definitely wouldn't work then....don't want anything to mess with the paint....so what about regular primer/sealer, would that work?

#13 spoonpluggergino

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 07:33 PM

I am using 3 different wood sealer. the first is spar urethane mixed with mineral spirit 50/50 mix , soak for 15 t0 20min, make sure you wipe off the excess off the bait than hang to dry. It is a litle messy but works . Another is boiled linseed oil with a litle bit of japan-drier I do not like the smell but it does a nice sealing job. The last one that I tried is minwax sanding sealer I really like this one no smell and it dries really fast and it leaves a nice surface to paint

Gino

#14 MR KNOW IT ALL KIND OF

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 10:12 PM

AC glue will seal it up and harden up the balsa.. after you put one coat of thin AC glue.. Hobby town Super glue its different than the regular super glue... THIN STUFF!! not Gel.. after it hardens up the bait sand it real good then.. take some Epoxy and coat the wood with that.. then wait 24 hours and sand it again.. then prime it.. if you have some holes or spots.. you can 2 one of two thing... epoxy coat it again and wait 24 more hours.. or get some bondo glazing putty. Glaze the bait with bondo wait 20 mins.lightly sand the bait and prime coat 1 more time..by now you should have a very smooth surface to paint on. You don't have to use AC glue you can just coat the bait with epoxy.. but the AC helps harden the bait and the 2nd coat of epoxy after you put on the AC glue really gives it strength. That is how I do it when I make balsa bait.. learned all this stuff from THE LURE PROFESSOR. It wasn't my idea. Hope this helps. Personally I believe this is the easiest way to seal up the wood without too much trouble. Most of us have AC glue and Epoxy. Good luck DIPSTICKs!

#15 Double D

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 04:24 AM

But since I use Basswood, are all these steps necessary, and if not, which ones can I eliminate....or would this process work the same for it too?

#16 RayburnGuy

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 05:58 AM

But since I use Basswood, are all these steps necessary, and if not, which ones can I eliminate....or would this process work the same for it too?


A lot of us use 30 minute epoxy to seal the lure where the hardness of the wood is not an issue like it is with balsa. The epoxy is self leveling so it provides a smooth surface to apply paint to. You will need a lure turner to spin the bait until the epoxy sets up enough it won't drip or sag. That is unless you want to sit there with the bait clamped in a tool of some sort and turn it by hand until it sets.

Ben

#17 littleriver

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 02:26 AM

Double D what sort of bait are you making from your basswood? Topwater, sinking , swimbait. The answer will influence which type of sealer to use. If your looking for quick and cheap, and max buoyancy, then the water method may be used.

The water method:
First, dip sanded bait in water and let dry.
Next, sand down all raised pores until bait is smooth.
Continue this process of wetting,drying and sanding until not more raised pores after wetting and drying.

If a sinking bait is wanted, then soaking in a 50/50 mix of boiled linseed oil and mineral spirits in a mason jar would do well. Wally world should have it. Lowes for sure. The longer the soak the deeper the penetration and the more buoyancy will be lost. Depending on the desired outcome 24hrs to a few days may be required. After soaking, allow bait to dry until it odor has gone away or at least considerably less smelly. Usually at least a few days to a week or more.

After sealing, I like this stuff

http://www.google.co...IwAw#ps-sellers

It may be brushed on or dip the bait in it. Two coats will be enough for most baits. Acts as a sealer , primer and base coat all in one. May be purchased at wally worlds. Allow at least 24 hrs to dry between coats . After drying, your ready to paint.

Edited by littleriver, 24 March 2012 - 02:33 AM.


#18 Double D

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 02:22 PM

Double D what sort of bait are you making from your basswood? Topwater, sinking , swimbait. The answer will influence which type of sealer to use. If your looking for quick and cheap, and max buoyancy, then the water method may be used.


As of right now, they are all topwater...wanna perfect my skills before I start attempting concepts like ballasts and correct angle of lips and such....once I get topwater down, then I can start working my way up the ladder...the only power tool I use is a Dremel Tool....everything else is done by hand.....I picked up a box of scrap basswood from my local Woodcraft store and had a friend cut the bigger pieces down to size for me...I live in a Condo which presents its' own set of problems with having a suitable area to work in....been reading on here about paints and such and have come to the conclusion that I should probably use water-based paints that are much less toxic than other alternatives....that will help with fumes in the place too, which my better half is concerned about.... a lot of useful information on this site....thanks again for all who contribute...as soon as I get to that point I can return the favor and share my endeavors.

#19 mark poulson

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 02:37 PM

Double D,
This is a great place to learn.
I use the "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" rule when it comes to making lures.
For topwaters, I put a similar sized lure that I know works in my flotation water bucket and ballast my lure until it sits in the water like the original.
I do the same thing with making cranks. I find that commercial lure makers have figured out what works, and I use their hard earned knowledge to flatten my learning curve.
I also copy ideas from the Hard Baits gallery. That's how I learned to make and mount line ties through the bill for deeper diving cranks (thanks Ben Siegel).
Good luck, and I look forward to seeing some of your lures.

#20 RayburnGuy

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 05:46 PM

That's how I learned to make and mount line ties through the bill for deeper diving cranks (thanks Ben Siegel).
Good luck, and I look forward to seeing some of your lures.


I can't take credit for that Mark. Everything I know about building lures was learned right here at TU. :yes:

Ben