Sbaits

Soft Pvc Trim Board Vs Screw Eyes

32 posts in this topic

Not sure how your conducting your "side test" or how relevant it is.

I conducted the side test by simply holding the block in my hands so it would be sideways and lifted. This was not a prolonged test as I wanted so see how it would stand after the hole was compramized.

Another situation where side forces are exerted is during netting. It is common for a pike to role or start thrashing in the net... That being said an extra large net does help keep them much calmer but occasionally it still happens.

Well I would have to say depending on the size of the jerk baits... what your using for screw eyes? also are you going to put recessed washers on the lure as well to help hold those eyes in?

Actually I was not planning on using washers but that's a good idea, most of these are prototypes so I won't be using them but once I get the weight and everything the way I like it then I will do that.

Home Made Twist Eye Testing

Wire is .045 stainless steel, total length of shaft in PVC was 5/8". I used an existing hole and just screwed the twist eye in and recessed it a bit. Used 5 min dollar store epoxy and let it cure for 18 hrs.

Test 1 - 70lb dead hang for 20hrs

Results: Passed

Test 2 - 105lb dead hang 12-18hrs

Results: Passed, note that the wire bent a bit and some time during the night one of the lowest weights was able to touch the floor just a bit. Everything was looked structurally sound a bit of cracking in the epoxy from the bend but thats it.

Test 3 - 105lb 20 lifts from complete unload

Results: Passed. I was not gentle I lifted it from the floor rather quickly each time and this was after all of the other tests.

Test 4 - Side force tests @ 105lbs, lifted it from both sides 3 times each.

Results: Passed!! The side bending broke off the epoxy at the top and only about 1/2" of the shaft was covered, I then proceeded to bounce the 105lbs up and down and after about 10 the wire snapped (likely due to the previous side load tests)!

Conclusion: Home made twist eyes with epoxy will not break in this PVC trim board.

Twisted Eye Break Test PVC.Jpeg

PVC Twist Eye Failure.jpeg

Twisted Eye Break Test PVC.Jpeg

PVC Twist Eye Failure.jpeg

Twisted Eye Break Test PVC.Jpeg

PVC Twist Eye Failure.jpeg

Twisted Eye Break Test PVC.Jpeg

PVC Twist Eye Failure.jpeg

Twisted Eye Break Test PVC.Jpeg

PVC Twist Eye Failure.jpeg

Twisted Eye Break Test PVC.Jpeg

PVC Twist Eye Failure.jpeg

Twisted Eye Break Test PVC.Jpeg

PVC Twist Eye Failure.jpeg

Twisted Eye Break Test PVC.Jpeg

PVC Twist Eye Failure.jpeg

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If you'll make your twisted wire eyes like the one in the photo below it will have more grip than the one you've shown above. The barrel twist is sort of like a threaded eye and it provides a lot more surface for the epoxy to lock on to.

Ben

barrel twist 001.jpg

barrel twist 001.jpg

barrel twist 001.jpg

barrel twist 001.jpg

barrel twist 001.jpg

barrel twist 001.jpg

barrel twist 001.jpg

barrel twist 001.jpg

post-21848-0-47748100-1333304342_thumb.jpg

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It would seem that you are giving this attachment to pvc method quite a thorough test however, I've noticed a few things. When would the connection ever experience a 70 to 105lb pull? Surely with Musky or Pike gear the drag would do it's thing well before this kind of stress would take place, even on a hookset with your thumb on the spool. If I'd build with pvc, (and I never will), I'd through-wire. I also through-wire lighter woods such as basswood and cedar, just a personal preference when fishing for Esox. It looks like your wire held fine although deformed, but I'd consider longer screw eyes and a stronger 20 minute epoxy for this method. PVC is not the end all material for lure making, I'll always throw a wood bait over plastic, I just like the way they perform. As far as longevity of a bait when fishing for Esox, they are all just going to get torn up. If you find a method of properly sealing wood, they'll last just as long as pvc. No finish can stand up to the teeth of this specie so realize that up front, do your research on all the different methods, and find the best for you. Good luck, and enjoy.

Douglas

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Awesome test results the other thing I was going to mention before I forget is there is always the brass cooder key option as well like Suick lures uses on there glider bates... seems to hold up pretty well to anything I've ever seen in person and on shows... and if a lure holds 105lbs and the eye doesn't come out I think you are really good to go... since even a 50lb fish in Water isn't going to exert 105lbs of force I wouldn't think... since both the lure and the fish are in water impact force I am guessing would not be as much.

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They only really good advantage I can see from PVC over wood for musky any way would be the easiness to repaint it if it was necessary since you don't have to worry about the pvc cracking if the fish takes the paint off or any of that... you can just sand lightly and repaint and recoat.... I was thinking to myself the other day pvc I am guessing still working on my first lures with it as well is going to be easier to glue foiled images to as well I would think since its plastic after all...

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Fantastic R&D Sbaits!

Rowhunter and Griffond I share the same sentiment as far as comparing wood and PVC.

Except, imagine trolling a lure 8-9 mph and a 50lb + musky coming the other way decides to hit your lure at full speed ?

A guide once told me he experienced this happening to him, it was fish of a lifetime.... and it took 2 treble hooks along with him.

If you're chasing supertankers I don't think you can afford to under engineer your musky lures.

s54

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Thanks everyone, I figured while I may not be the greatest bait maker right now I could give back by doing some testing. Originally I was just going to make sure they were on par with my .072 screw eyes but after a sudden failure after I was feeling confident with it I decided to go all out. I suppose I could epoxy in a screw eye and test it but at this point I think it is redundant, since after testing the twisted eye I suspect the screw eye will open up before pulling out.

When would the connection ever experience a 70 to 105lb pull? Surely with Musky or Pike gear the drag would do it's thing well before this kind of stress would take place, even on a hookset with your thumb on the spool. If I'd build with pvc, (and I never will), I'd through-wire. I also through-wire lighter woods such as basswood and cedar, just a personal preference when fishing for Esox. It looks like your wire held fine although deformed, but I'd consider longer screw eyes and a stronger 20 minute epoxy for this method. PVC is not the end all material for lure making, I'll always throw a wood bait over plastic, I just like the way they perform. As far as longevity of a bait when fishing for Esox, they are all just going to get torn up. If you find a method of properly sealing wood, they'll last just as long as pvc. No finish can stand up to the teeth of this specie so realize that up front, do your research on all the different methods, and find the best for you. Good luck, and enjoy.

Douglas

Agreed, the twisted eye was short mainly because I was using scrap materials, started off with a barrel twist but switched when I noticed it was going to not make it to the bottom. My main goal is to feel confident that my work is not going to fail, particularly since I'm not through wiring. Plus if anything does fail I'd want it to be a hook or a split ring that way I can get the bait back (could come in handy during snags). But since I use 2x+ hooks and splits rings that might be moot.

I'm not sure if I'm going to like PVC, it doesn't seem to handle dents well so I suspect I will destroy the finish quickly but hey not having to worry about water is nice particularly for testing I was thinking of routing out a section where I think the ballast should go then just using a waterproof putty that does not harden (silly putty? + some microballoons or Styrofoam to match the buoyancy) to fill the gaps and hold the ballast that way I could adjust it easily at the lake. The other reason I'm interested in PVC is that is should be rather consistent to work with, so far it was been excellent to router and drill. Its also very buoyant.

Edited by Sbaits

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