aaron4mvp

Heat Setting Between Coats?

32 posts in this topic

I have an Excalibur food dehydrator. Works extremely well when working with multiple lures. Temp is adjustable from room to 160F (not enough for true heat set) and has a 24 hr timer. Fan is low speed compared to a hair dryer. You could hang a couple dozen lures in it if you wanted. I dry most coats at 90F for several minutes and then close the door and dry overnight when I'm done.

 

http://s171.photobucket.com/user/Krash7172/media/misc/20130501_233709.jpg.html

 

 

Curious what would happen setting DN quickly at first to prevent reactions / wrinkling before moving to a suitable location to cure...

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I'm sure if there's a different way to finish a lure, a TU'er will or has tried it!  I haven't had a problem with DN wrinkling paint since I began hanging lures to dry and cure, letting any excess drip off the tail.  The wrinkling happened for me when DN was allowed to collect in an area on the lure and remain liquid long enough for it to wrinkle the paint.  Clipping the wet lures on a rotating frame prevented the excess from dripping off and that contributed to the problem, so just hanging them up to dry worked fine and I haven't had a wrinkle since.    

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I'm not sure how it would effect the curing process of DN by putting it in a dehydrator since the curing process is started by exposure to moisture. Namely in the form of humidity in the air around us. Might be worth a try. Let us know if you give it a shot.

 

Ben

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There are two mechanisms. The solvent (toluene) evaporates in hours and then the moisture cure takes days. I assume the solvent is what reacts with the substrate so maybe speed up the evaporation to prevent wrinkles (1 hour set?) and then cure normally. I might test it next time I use DN. I was hoping to do atleast 2 coats but I've experienced some wrinkles.

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I also experienced wrinkles with double coats.  I was used to thick epoxy topcoats and I think that led me to question thin DN topcoats.  But after fishing lures that were single coated for awhile, I found them to be very durable so decided multiple coats were not needed.  When I removed the finish from a few DN coated lures, I saw that it had penetrated through the acrylic latex paint to form a tough monolithic finish.  That eased any concerns I had about using a single coat and I'm wondering if heat setting the DN to quickly flash off the toluene might inhibit its penetration and adhesion.  Don't know - but I wonder....  Let us know how it turns out if you go with multiple coats and speed dry the DN.

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From the Createx website...

 

Createx Airbrush Colors and Wicked Colors cure best when paint is thoroughly dried prior to application of heat.


Do not heat cure fresh paint before it air cures for a few minutes. Premature application of heat may skin-over paint creating a latex film which peels easily when taped and otherwise lacks proper adhesion.


Createx Airbrush Colors are not cured after drying, heat is required. Wicked Colors air dry to a durable film without heat curing although use of heat does achieve optimum film strength.


Heat Gun: apply heat at a low to mid-temperature setting no more than 300°F. Keep air moving to avoid blistering. Apply heat until paint is warm to the touch.


Shirt Press: 325°F for 15 –20 seconds.


Iron: With a protective cloth over paint, set on high/ cotton setting and iron for @ 2 minutes. A shirt press or iron is recommended for curing t-shirt artwork intended for washing.

 

It says the heat gun should not be above 300 deg F, not that you need to heat the paint that high.  Paint should be heated "warm to the touch" to heat cure.  I think a hair dryer will do that job.  The hair dryer I use reaches 185 deg F.  That's actually VERY warm to the touch!  They recommend letting the paint dry for a few minutes before "heat curing".  Should be no harm in using lower temp air to speed up drying.

 

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