anamealreadyinuse

Foil Method Faux Paux? What Did I Do Wrong?

16 posts in this topic

I am using a product called Seal-Coat from CS Coatings and created the exact same bait using the same wood, tissue and rattle can paint as before a few weeks ago. This time around I am getting these wormy looking bubbles that are ruining the bait's finish. I spend a few hours carving and sanding these so it's a major pisser when they look like this at the very end? I did notice I can lance 'em lightly like a boil and then press with a round metal surface and they somewhat disappear but it muddies the patter on the foil.

What am I doing wrong and how do I avoid in the future?

Attached is a sample:

IMAG0390.jpg

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Its a single part coating which is why I like it and it does not dry prematurely like Dick Nites stuff...alot less hassle so far but not as strong I don't think. Website here. I am putting the tissue on a piece of paper and using a glue stick to keep the tissue in place on the printer and then cut out the tissue and glue using spray elemer's glue to the shiny side of alumninum foil and cutting out from there. I then spray the back of the aluminum foil with the elmers glue again and place on the bait. What do you think?

Edited by anamealreadyinuse

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Griffond    30

well the only question i guess would be did you shorten your dry time for the tissue layer over the foal? i guess what my thought was is was there still air trapped under the paper and it just worked its way out after you put the clear coat on... or the clear coat had bubbles in it when you brushed it on.....what would happen i wonder if you used an exacto knife on the bubbles very carefully and then just recoat it would it fill in the gaps seemlessly i wonder...

or your bait just looks like it was swimming to close to the run off water from the local power plant lol

Edited by Griffond

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saltshaker    63

I am using a product called Seal-Coat from CS Coatings and created the exact same bait using the same wood, tissue and rattle can paint as before a few weeks ago. This time around I am getting these wormy looking bubbles that are ruining the bait's finish. I spend a few hours carving and sanding these so it's a major pisser when they look like this at the very end? I did notice I can lance 'em lightly like a boil and then press with a round metal surface and they somewhat disappear but it muddies the patter on the foil.

What am I doing wrong and how do I avoid in the future?

Attached is a sample:

IMAG0390.jpg

I'm not familiar with CS Coatings, but, if it happens to be a moisure cure urethane...therein lies your problem most likely. I do the same foiling process as you....even with the same glue. I've never had any finishing issues except when I used Garco clear, a moisture cure urethane. It did the same thing on my lures. My guess is that something in the glue reacted with the clear...or vise versa. I'll betcha if you cleared your lure with an acrylic-based product and then used the CS....your problem would be solved. But, by using a water-based product...you might be creating another problem. :unsure: Good luck. Hope you figger it out.

Edited by saltshaker

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Come to think of it, the dry time of the paper/foil the first time had dried for a few days where this batch I only waited another hour...that is the only difference I can think of. I have a few extra blanks I'll tackle this week and we'll see if the paper/foil will have the same effect after a few days of drying.

What is an example of an acrylic based, is that like devcon? I like the devcon but my fingers get tired turning it and I'm lazy this stuff was nice as I could roll it around a bit and then set it upright and forget it. Totally not worth it though if it does this to the baits.

Edited by anamealreadyinuse

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Griffond    30

so out of curiosity did you happen to order a big can of cs coating or did you just get the little 4oz guy. the reason i ask is if you have a quart of it you could try dipping your lure instead of brushing it... also it never hurts to ask the people that make it if they have any suggestions as well since they've been selling it for a long time... and if that doesn't work out for ya you can always go get a can of automotive clear coat...that works good as well and spray it on.

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RayburnGuy    1,338

If you did everything exactly the same as before except for the difference in drying time for the glue you used to attach the paper to the foil then that is most likely your answer. You could try speeding up the curing time for the glue by warming it up with a hair dryer. Start out by applying just enough heat to warm it up. Too much heat could possibly make the glue bubble up. Or you could try to using a different type of glue. And it doesn't have to be a "glue". When doing photo over foil I spray the foil with either Upol ( a spray can clear) or the decal spray used to affix photo decals onto baits, coffee cups, etc. Another thing I do when using the photo over foil process is to brush a light coat of epoxy over the photo/foil after it's attached to the bait. Epoxy, as far as I know, is inert and doesn't react with the solvents in the things we use to make baits and it will protect anything under it. Once hardened it can be sanded to a glass like smoothness and then covered with the top coat of your choice which will remove any marks left by the sanding. The epoxy adds an extra step to the lure building process, but it's up to you as to how far your willing to go to get a good looking, well protected lure.

Ben

Edited by RayburnGuy

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bobv    28

I tried the CS clear and had several problems with it. It reacted with some brands of paint by wrinkling them. Also the baits will turn milky white if left in a wet environment. For photo finishes I like to use a thin epoxy for the first coat then add a second of whatever. A lure turner is a must.

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Griffond    30

by the way as far as a lure turner goes for anyone that doesn't have a rotisery motor handy if you have a corded drill with a speed knob on the trigger just turn it all the way down to the lowest setting and stick an L bent peice of wire or something along these lines and leave it run on the work bench for 30 minutes or so... works great... or make a small wheel with 4-5 spots and use a bolt or something thru it to put in the chuck... i'm working on that part but im guessing that will work pretty good to...

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RayburnGuy    1,338

you re-coat the D2T? after you put it on Rayburn?

When doing a photo over foil I put a coat of epoxy over the photo/foil before I ever paint the bait. This does two things for me. It levels out the edges of the foil so there is a smooth surface to paint on and it seals the photo and foil so whatever I use over them has no reaction with the adhesives in the foil or the photo. It's an extra step, but it is small insurance for getting a good finish.

Ben

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Thanks Ben, I think I'll give that a try with the epoxy on the next school. Great idea on the drill Griffond...I bought a new drill on the cheap and did not realize it was not variable...this is exactly the justification I need to get a variable speed one :-)

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