Grey Ghost

Paint Job Tips For Those Who Don't Have An Air Brush

15 posts in this topic

I have been messing around with lures a while now, but have never bought an air brush. I am definately not an artistic painter but really wish I could be one. To date, I have used hand brush paints and spray cans over typical net patterns for scale patterns. I end up sticking with solid colors of black, silver and gold with bars of other colors that result in the desired contrast. Are there any other non-air brush painters out there? That could post some of their tricks for a more presentable finish in their paint jobs?

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Depends on your target species. Try stencils and hand paint against for crisp color differences. But most preyfish AFAIK don't have crisp differences, so go figure <L>.

Good luck.

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I don't know if this will work for wooden baits, but for the PVC baits I make, and some of the clear plastic knockoffs I buy, I use fingernail polish.

It's quick, strong, and lasts. The cheap stuff I buy at CVS dries in less than an hour.

I can't get the fine scale patterns that I can with an airbrush and mesh, but I can get a good scale likeness with some of the clear glitter polish.

You just have to be sure the first coat is completely dry before you go over it with another.

I put the glitter polish onto my airbrushed baits, too, to give them extra flash.

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I've used Hard as Nails on wood with varying success. It is a good clear coat, but don't spare it.

Eventually it will chip (could be the adhesive properties to the paint). Normally the the first breakdown will be at the rear wiggle hook possibly due to wear. I go to a dollar store when they are having closeouts.

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These guys are hand painted and dipped in polyurethane. Those are from 2009(?). What you are seeing in the lower lure as a gold is the yellowing of the poly over time.

The eyes were done using the nail method.

Edited by garyo1954

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Thanks for the replys. I see the crazy paint jobs some of you guys come up with and can only say wow.

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i started off using just spray cans. i sometimes spray on the main base coat, then spray some clear. then spray like a pattern and then sand it off and whatever didnt get sanded off stayed and gave off a nice effect. also, cutting a small hole on paper or shoot through a funnel to narrow your spray patterns allows you to spray paint with more finesse.

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suprisingly, this was on spray can too! too bad the lip broke off on the lake..=(285047_10150752992635195_629430194_20688947_2468965_n.jpg

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Wow Gekhang, those look great!

Keep that broken Rapala and make a replacement lip from 1/8" lexan.

I've replace a number of the Rapala lips. The newer ones aren't supposed to be as brittle.

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I have been messing around with lures a while now, but have never bought an air brush. I am definately not an artistic painter but really wish I could be one. To date, I have used hand brush paints and spray cans over typical net patterns for scale patterns. I end up sticking with solid colors of black, silver and gold with bars of other colors that result in the desired contrast. Are there any other non-air brush painters out there? That could post some of their tricks for a more presentable finish in their paint jobs?

I use water based acrylics. I thin the paint with a 50/50 demineralized water and rubbing alcohol. Also add a few drops of liquid glycerin. Glycerin and alcohol can be found in pharmacy. When I say thin, I mean really thin. A spec of paint to a few drops of water solution. This will allow you to control the amount of pigment and paint on lure. This will allow you to soft shade just like an airbrush. I use small water color brushes and always wipe on paper towel of piece paper before going to lure with brush to ensure the brush is not too wet. Too wet is when the paint runs or goes places you did not intend. This will work for about any acrylic paint you desire to use from cheap folk art to artist quality acrylics. In time, perhaps you will no longer need to thin your paint and work straight from tube. Good luck ...Vic

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You guys amaze me. Great work, I only wish my non-airbrushed work was as good. Thank you for the replys

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Wow Gekhang, those look great!

Keep that broken Rapala and make a replacement lip from 1/8" lexan.

I've replace a number of the Rapala lips. The newer ones aren't supposed to be as brittle.

wish i could keep it. it broke off on the cast and i couldnt find it. =/

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wish i could keep it. it broke off on the cast and i couldnt find it. =/

gekhang,

I feel your pain. Losing a lure that you made yourself is a painful experience.

I had a similar thing happen to me this weekend. I was prefishing for a tourney, and testing a prototype crank.

It was the same body size and shape as a lure I've made before, but with a wider and longer bill.

It swam beautifully, so I fished it for a while.

Mistake!

When it got hung in some brush in 12' of water, I used my extending lure retriever to try and get it back. Because it was windy, I rushed, and didn't tighten the first section before I lowered it down the line.

When I felt the lure, I began poking around to free it, and the retriever snagged the brush or wood, and the first section pulled out.

So I lost both the lure and the lure retriever.

The next day, after weigh in, another angler (a friend) came up to me to show me a homemade lure he found floating in the back of that cove.

It was mine!

There was a small bit of paint damage, from the lure retriever, but otherwise it was fine!

I was thrilled.

He gave it back to me, no questions asked.

I gave him another, similar lure as a reward. That one hunts, so he's probably going to use it to whip my butt the rest of the year, but it was worth it to get my prototype back.

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I just posted two photos of those baits in the hardbaits gallery, if you're interested.

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