Musky Glenn

Holey Hell Hound

22 posts in this topic

I posted a series of 8 photos, in the gallery, of the lightened hell hound that I made. I used pvc cut and glued it up hollow to be lighter and was able to save 2.1 oz. of weight. Musky Glennholliehellhound001.jpg

Edited by Musky Glenn

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Thats alot of weight savings when you throw it 100 plus times a day and it looks good did you put in any ribs to make it stronger so the fish won;t crush it?I know you talks about it in your other post

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Yes there is one center brace that made it feel sufficient. There are 8 photos in the gallery that show the whole process. I was surprised at how fast it filled with water then sank at the correct speed. Can't wait to sling it a while. Cotter pins were an easy hook hanger addition. I only saved about 3/4 oz. of weight by removing the center, the main weight savings was the lead it would have taken to sink that part removed. Musky Glenn

Edited by Musky Glenn

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holliehellhound006.jpg

This photo shows the center brace. It is cut short so water can move quickly from one chanber to the next, both for filling and draining. Draining for the next cast was one of the most important aspects of the design. I hope the sides don't act like rudders and limit the "walk" that is so important to this lure. I'm thinking it will probably take a harder pull to change directions. If it does act like a rudder the top won't turn and the bottom will, causing it to roll. I may have to add larger fins to the side to stabilize that roll. Musky Glenn

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I took the lure to the lake and had a problem with it. It is supposed to walk right and left under water. It will only walk to the right, left as I am looking at it coming in. If I was lucky, I could get it to go to the left once per cast. Just a series or walks to the right. The worry I had about water entering and draining was not a problem. As soon as it hits the water it instantly fills.

I glued the weight inside the body near the front and back, would it walk better if the weight were in the center of the lure. That still wouldn't account for it only going to the right or would it? All the cotter pins were bent along the center line. The lure looks semetrical. I am open for suggestions.

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Little River, I have not changed the line tie. I will give that a try in the morning. Thanks Musky Glenn

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Not sure how much help it will be but simple to do. I would attempt to tune just like a crankbait. Sounds like somthing is out of alignment and the line tie may be able to adjust to a working condition. If not you may be stuck . But maybe not so bad. You could really work that baby deep under cover. Ie boatdocks

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I don't make sub-surface gliders, but, on my surface walkers, having the weight more central, and slightly past the mid point, is key for walking.

I want the rear of the lure to be heavier, so it has more inertia and wants to keep moving when the front stops, which initiates the walking action.

I don't know if sub-surface gliders are weighted similarly.

When I was trying to duplicate the weighting of a lure I liked, I would put it on my workbench with no hooks, and put a pencil under it, crossways. Then I'd move the lure until it balanced, and that told me where the center of gravity was, so I could shoot for that with my own lure.

That method should work for the Hell Hound, too, just to give you an idea of how the weight is distributed in the original.

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Mark, They must be weighted differently because these sub surface lures usually fall pretty level, best I can tell by looking at them. The pencil trick would tell me where the center of gravity is, but I can make a guess that it is close to center by it falling level. Would the pencil help in determining if the weight is all in the center or half on each end? I hung weight to the front, middle and back hook to get it to sink properly, level. I then glued this weight inside above the hooks best I could.

Upon MUCH further inspection, that even though I sawed the flat front top angle correctly, when I sanded it, I hand sanded it and made it out of square. Thus it is acting as a rudder and pushing the lure to the right. I have resanded it and am getting ready to go back to the lake. I have a couple of more lures that are drying to be taken also. Thanks for all the suggestions, you guys have all the answers. Musky Glenn

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Well, that got rid of the problem of the lure just walking one way. Now it won't walk either way. Just straight forward. Where did I lay my whittling knife? Musky Glenn

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LoL ..................Now that is a tough nut to crack.

And she turned so easy before.................Your really close..............Maybe just a litte more weight to rear or bit more uniform drag on the nose . I hope the lure gods smile on you soon. I know your pain.

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Littleriver, That drag on the nose, I believe is my problem. Going to look back into that part of the bait. I used the cotter pin for the line tie and any more bluntness will result in the line tie being a 1/4 inch in front of the lure, because of the need to cut off some of the front of the lure. This cutting will make the front of the lure more blunt. New bearings for my bandsaw will be here Monday. Then I can just make another one from scratch if I ruin this one. Pvc sure does carve easy. :halo: Musky Glenn

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I reshaped the nose area and now I have it back to doing the same thing it did in the beginning, turning right only. I stripped down a "Manta" lure to repaint and found that most of the weight was placed near the middle of the lure. I have taken most of the weight back out of my hh and will glue it back in near the middle instead of each end like it was originally.

Another thing I will try next will be to install some type of baffle system to control water movement within the lure. You might call it the sloshing effect. The bearings for my band saw will be here Monday and it may be easier to just build another one with the new changes. Glad I'm retired and not trying to collect wages from someone for all the work I am doing on this $28.00 lure. If you have any suggestions I would enjoy hearing them. Thanks for all your help. Musky Glenn

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I'm still pretty new to building gliders, but have had better luck when the ballast was more centrally located. It seems to free the ends of the lure up so they pivot side to side more freely. Good luck and keep us posted.

Ben

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I would try putting a water small 1/4"-3/8" inlet at the back of the bait on the bottom and a small vent hole on top in the front and try it without a baffle if that didn't work I would try putting alot of small ribs in the bait to get rid of the sloshing judging by the picture it looks like your leaving the whole bottom of the bait open and I think this is effecting your gliding. either way this idea WILL BE a great bait some day I am thinking of copying this idea to see what I can come up with it won't be anytime soon since the honey do list is getting pretty long after a good spring of fishing

Just had another idea if you leave the top and bottom open and put the ribs on an angle it could have a diving effect like a suick without the tail it would be a great bait if you could get it to go up anddown while doing a a nice side to side glide

Just some of my ideas thought they might help

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Rowingadubay, The top of the lure is open and the bottom is closed. When this lure is retrieved I can see the whole in the top and it just doesn't look realistic. But for a musky which hunts by looking up, most of the time, it gives a more natural look. I haven't moved the weight yet, but I believe that will cure my problem, at least that is my next effort. Musky Glenn

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I build a few gliders and have found that if i weight the glider just in front of my hook hanger with most of the weight needed to sink it at the right speed and add enough weight to the back end to float it just a tad tail high from level i get a great glideing action and you can even reel the lure and get it to glide right and left about 1 1/2 to 2 ft as its swimming

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Thanks Crankpaint, That will be my next try. I moved the weight to the center of the lure and with that much weight, I got it to high and now it is unstable as to wanting to roll on its side. Back to the drawing board. We fished this past Sat. and raised one musky on the solid lure. I also raised 5 on a big shallow invader that I have been working on. The rest of the bandsaw parts should be here Monday. The first order of parts came a week ago but I still needed more parts. I should have checked it out better the first time. We caught one thirty inch musky on an inline spinner. (Bucktail) Musky Glenn

Edited by Musky Glenn

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