Fast Freddy

Fixing Dimples

11 posts in this topic

Hi. New member here. I have started clear coating crank baits with 30 min. Devcon 2 . First five baits turned out perfect.. My last bait has a couple small dimples on the back of the lure. Will a second coat fill in these voids??? If so, do I take clear coat entire lure or just the area with dimpling??? All input and feedback much appreciated.

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You can just "touch-up" the dimples but it will not not blend with your first coat. If you don't mind the imperfections, the touch up will work. However, a second coat will solve your problem.

Gene

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I will make sure the lure is clean and put a 2nd coat on.. I've been painting my own lures for a short while now and appreciate all the great info people share on this site. Thanks again.

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Here's something you may or may not know that will help to ensure full coverage when top coating your lures. After you brush your top coat on hold it up to the light at an angle and you will be able to see any small imperfections. Be sure to roll the bait around so you end up looking at the whole surface.

Ben

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Thanks RayburnGuy. Will do. My paint shop is still under construction and better lighting is on the list. How long do you typically let devcon cure before putting lure lure to use??? I have read 24 hrs. and good to go..I might wait 2 to 3 days to be safe.

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Cure time is not something I have to worry about as I don't get to fish as much as I used to so most of my baits set around for at least a week or more before they're put to use. Lot of guys use the 24 hour period and seem to have good luck with it. Some of the things we use to coat lures will be at something like 70% cured within a few hours. That may mean it's dry to the touch, but not fully cured. Only when it's fully cured does it reach it's full strength and durability. You'll probably be alright using D2T with a 24 hour curing time, but if it's not a problem for you an extra 24 to 48 hours is not going to hurt anything.

One more thing about setting up the lighting for your paint shop. You can never have too much lighting. And the positioning of your lights is important as well. I like it to come from the sides and at angles from behind and a little above my shoulders. You might play with different angles until you get something that suits you before locking everything into position. You should be looking for something that leaves no shadows while working on your lures.

hope this helps,

Ben

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I coat my lures at night and fish them the next day. Maybe that accounts for some extra hook rash that I get. Works for me though. Musky Glenn

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I've fished lots of D2T coated lures after 18-24 hrs with no problem. Epoxy is mostly cured in 24 hrs but the cure actually continues for several days - maybe up to a week. One thing I will say - every hobby builder seems to be in a hurry to finish building their baits. I understand the feeling but this hobby has tought me one thing if nothing else: All too often, it's "hurry up and screw up".

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I've fished lots of D2T coated lures after 18-24 hrs with no problem. Epoxy is mostly cured in 24 hrs but the cure actually continues for several days - maybe up to a week. One thing I will say - every hobby builder seems to be in a hurry to finish building their baits. I understand the feeling but this hobby has tought me one thing if nothing else: All too often, it's "hurry up and screw up".

This. Even in my short two months as a luremaker I have found the best way to get slowed down is to get in a hurry... Especially where painting is concerned (for me anyway... I had painted motorcycles for a few years and even though the techniques are similar painting wooden lures is different from painting metal tanks and fenders...). One other thing I have learned is to know when to leave well enough alone... I have screwed up more than one lure already trying to go from "good enough" to "perfect"...

BTH

Edited by bluetickhound

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