dochollow

Deco Art Crackle

15 posts in this topic

has any body used a product called "DECOART ONE STEP CRACKLE"? just wondering how you used it { the instructions are very vague}. were you happy with the results? i know about the ELMER GLUE process, but havent tried that yet either. can you air brush the paint over the glue or crackle medium or must it be brushed? :popcorn: thanx, DOC

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Hey Doc, I haven't used the stuff you mentioned, but I have tried some Folk Art crackle medium and for one reason or another couldn't get it to work properly. The instructions on the bottle said the humidity had to be below a certain point for best results and the humidity here in East Texas didn't want to cooperate with the instructions.

I've had my best results using Elmer's white glue. I spray mine through a #5 nozzle in a Paasche VL (fairly large tip) and then spray the paint over the glue before it dries. It doesn't hurt to let the glue tack up a bit, but you don't want to wait too long. The cracking is a result of the different drying rates between the glue and the paint. Hitting it with a little heat from a hair dryer or heat gun seems to help it crack a little better as well. If you use a paint brush the cranks want to appear following the grain of the brush strokes. For a more random cracking pattern an airbrush works better for me.

There are multiple videos on youtube that show the process with the Elmer's if you haven't already viewed some of them.

good luck,

Ben

Edited by RayburnGuy

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Ben,

Black paint brushed onto a lure with a silver base, head to tail, should make a great striper!

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If you use Elmer's white glue.....it needs to be thinned with water a little so it shoots threw the airbrush.....Good luck.

Edited by Brent R

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When I tried shooting thinned Folk Art crackle medium thru an airbrush, it sprayed out something resembling cob webs. Now I know how they make them for horror movies! In my tries at using crackle medium, I got best results brushing on the medium, shooting paint with an airbrush, then drying it with a hair dryer before the medium or the paint dried (the instructions say to let the medium dry before painting but I never got any results doing that). There are many variables to control - how much crackle medium on the lure, how dry you let it get before painting it, how heavy you spray the paint, how much heat if any you apply, and last but not least, what exact kind of paint you use. Some paints crackle much more easily than others due to their chemistry. The whole process requires experimentation. One suggestion - do both sides of the lure at once or the crackle will never match. For me, the results were so variable that I pretty much gave up on it. If there is a crackle expert in the house, perhaps he can lay out a reliable process for us all?

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Once in a while the paint won't crack in certain spots and it can be pretty obvious. One solution I came up with was to take a small artists brush and cut all but a few fibers from the brush. Then I just go over the areas that didn't crack and paint the cracks in with whatever color I used for the base. Once it's clear coated you'll never know the difference.

Ben

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I've messed around with the crackle medium and found a couple things affect how it works. Textured baits need a thick coat of the medium to get a smooth surface for the crackle to work best. You need to shoot a thick coat of paint, the thinner the paint layer the less crackle you get. I heat dry the medium then paint and heat dry paint.

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For a crackle look I have used liquid hide glue in the brown bottle. I brush the glue on and then apply my final coat.

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For a crackle look I have used liquid hide glue in the brown bottle. I brush the glue on and then apply my final coat.

"liquid hide glue"? elaborate please. thanx, DOC. :?

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Hide glue is made from animal bones and hides, especially cows. Used in the furniture industry and is available in powder or liquid form. Never used it myself but have asked that question on many a test. Musky Glenn

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Hide glue is one of the earliest glues used in furniture making.

I often wonder who figured out that boiling hide and bones would make a glue.

Maybe that's where the saying "Sticks to your ribs" comes from. Hahaha

Because it can be dissolved (I don't know which solvent is used), it is reversible, so you can take a loose or broken joint apart without machining and repair it. Since furniture, particularly chairs, take a lot of torque, joints do tend to loosen, or fail, so this feature makes hide glue attractive, particularly with antiques and older furniture.

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I've had my best results using Elmer's white glue. I spray mine through a #5 nozzle in a Paasche VL (fairly large tip) and then spray the paint over the glue before it dries. It doesn't hurt to let the glue tack up a bit, but you don't want to wait too long. The cracking is a result of the different drying rates between the glue and the paint. Hitting it with a little heat from a hair dryer or heat gun seems to help it crack a little better as well. If you use a paint brush the cranks want to appear following the grain of the brush strokes. For a more random cracking pattern an airbrush works better for me.

There are multiple videos on youtube that show the process with the Elmer's if you haven't already viewed some of them.

good luck,

Ben

Ben...what do you use to clean your airbrush out after spraying the Elmer's Glue? You using water, Acetone, A/B cleaner ???

Thanks.

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I just use water Kris. Since the Elmer's is already diluted with water before spraying it cleans up pretty easy. I do clean it thoroughly though. By running clean water through the brush multiple times and back flushing often I haven't had any problems using the Elmer's white glue.

Ben

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