Musky Glenn

Moisture Cured Urethanes

13 posts in this topic

With a back ground in the building trades and teaching cabinetmaking I came across the use of moisture cured urethane as one of the best wood floor finishes that we used at that time.

I was doing a google search of mcu and found there was a lot of information about them but not much in the line of availability or pricing. A lot of the information was related to paints instead of clear finishes so be careful when reading descriptions. One interesting item I did find was on the coronadopaint.com web site where they mentioned an accelerator. It is Conoguard mcu accelerator 3825-1B. It said it increased recoat time to 30 min.

I have not used these items but they sound promising. All the mcu that I used was special ordered from my local paint store. A lot of paint companies sell it, but I don't push any one brand over the other. As they say, "I don't have a dog in this fight". lol Musky Glenn

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Glenn,

One of the TU site sponsors, Dick Nite, sells a moisture cured urethane that lots of people here use for lure top coats.

He developed it for his spoons, which he sells commercially, and it took off from there.

It is a known product that was developed specifically for fishing lures.

I don't use it myself, so I can't comment on it from experience, but, if you do a site search for it I'm sure you'll find enough to read to keep you off the lake for the rest of the summer. Hahaha

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I dont know if there is a more hotly debated topic on the entire site than the Great Topcoat/Sealer Debate... As for me, i probably have 80% of the products mentioned (and at least one or two nobody has brought up..) and am trying out each to see which i prefer to continue working with. I have some DN S81 on order and cant wait for it to come in for testing...

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I have almost 2 full quarts of Target Coatings, EM9000 and Em9300 that I would gladly give to any baitmaker who wants it to try. The cavet is, with $3.50 per gallon for gas you would have to live within 2 miles of me to even make it worthwhile, unless you are doing a gymn floor or furniture. On their website the stuff is wonderful but on any anything that gets near water not so much. At a little over $30 a quart it is not worth the price of shipping. Stick with the epoxies or DN.

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Whittler - I used my 9300 on a wood sign at my aunt's house. ;) Worked pretty good in that application, no so good when I tried it on baits. I know there's at least one TU guy who likes it but I just can't get beyond the whitening and softening when wet. As far as MCU's, I've tried several and still am liable to pick up a quart of whatever brand if I see it on sale. Famowood, Garco, etc. But I do prefer the thinner viscosity of Dick Nite and they way it bonds through acrylic paint. To anyone using MCU on baits for the first time: you can apply it any way you like but be sure to read and heed about preserving it.

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I don't use mcu's because of the odor of xylene (?). I only posted this because there was so much trouble in getting DN. Several of the sites mentioned using bloxogen (?) to prolong shelf life and one site mentioned flooding a thin coat of the proper thinner on top of the mcu for the same purpose.

Mark- It is over a 100 degrees in the sun here in NC and that is all it takes to keep me off the lake. lol I have been working on some pvc lures, musky size and found a design that seems to work nicely. I raised 5 muskies on it one day. The next six that I made I tapered the tail thinner to give it a more natural look. Well, you know what that did, killed ALL the action. That has kept me off the lake also. I have since added wedge shaped pieces to the rear sides to try and get the action back. When will I ever learn to leave well enough alone. :flame: . Still working on that hollow bodied hell hound. I modified the first one right into oblivion. The second one has no action at all. It has a top and is only open 1/2 inch in front and back. I have moved the weights and hope to try it again tomorrow. Got MUSKY club meeting tonight. Love this thing called retirement. Musky Glenn

Edited by Musky Glenn

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Glenn,

I can't imagine fishing in 100 degree humid air. I don't blame you for not fishing.

Maybe you could make the lure hollow by drilling it lengthwise with several smaller holes that you could leave open, so the lure will sink, and still leave enough PVC for strength. Or maybe crosswise. I have no idea how the original works, so I'm flying blind here.

What kind of glue are you using to attach your wedges?

Edited by mark poulson

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Mark, Not knowing any better than I do and being an active shade tree plumber and it being pvc, I just used my handy dandy pvc plumbing glue. Works like a charm. I am going to try the new hell hound out in the morning and if It works I will post a photo of how it is made. I hate having to post photos in the gallery instead of where we are discussing a lure build up. To much jumping back and forth to try and maintain a line of thought, which I have trouble with any way. :halo: I really can cut a lot of weight off a lure by ripping it down, taking out the inside and gluing it back together. Weight distribution seems to be critical, just can't get a handle on it. The only thing that keeps me working on this is the fact that the original would jump to the right just like it was supposed to. If it will do that, then it is missing something to make it jump back the other way. This new one won't jump either way. Just absolutely straight ahead. When they are right they sink about 1-2 feet and "walk the dog" with easy pulls that make the lure swing from side to side by about fifteen inches. Deadly on muskies. It is an extremely easy lure to work when it is right. Throwing the weight is the work, thus the work to remove the weight. I will gladly accept any ideas that any one has!!!!

It used to be that the thing that I knew the least about was electricity, now it is proper weight distribution of a musky glide bait. There are plenty of you tube videos of good musky glide baits if you want to see one in action. Maybe I know so little about weight distribution that it isn't weight distribution that is causing the problem. Musky Glenn

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Glenn, you can post pictures in the thread as long as they're relevant to the conversation. No rule against that. The rule against posting pictures in the forums is for those who are simply showcasing their work. That's what the gallery is for.

And I've had better luck with the gliders I've built by putting the ballast closer to the middle as long as the lure stays properly balanced so the head and tail stay on the same plain. Now I haven't built any musky size lures so I'm not sure if that will hold true on baits of that size, but it works on the smaller, bass sized, baits I've built.

good luck,

Ben

Edited by RayburnGuy

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Glenn,

Ben is absolutely right about the pictures...We just don't want people show casing there work here...As for what your doing it's perfectly acceptable.."a picture is worth a thousand words!!"...Nathan

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Glenn,

Your idea to make a lure that's the same size. falls at the same rate and has the same action as the original, but is lighter, is a tough nut to crack, especially on a walking glider.

The walking action relies on uneven distribution of the weight, with the back half of the lure heavier than the front, so it has more inertia in the water. The lighter front half of the lure yields to the resistance of the water first, so it turns as the heavier back keeps going. Kind of like a jackknifed trailer.

Overall weight is what makes the bait sink at the same rate.

And shape is what affects hydrodynamics, which is how water passes over the lure as it is worked.

I'm afraid anything you do to lighten the lure will affect one or all of these characteristics.

Myself, I'd probably settle for a smaller version first, so I could retain the same basic design but make it lighter by virtue of it's overall size.

But I feel for you.

Good luck.

Edited by mark poulson

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Rayburn Guy, Nathan and Mark, Thanks for straightening me out on posting photos. I took my hollow hell hound to the lake this morning and it would turn a little better but still not right. Mark you description of how the weight works makes sense and will be my next try. I am also going to make the third lure with a thicker bottom so I can round off the bottom instead of having it so flat sided. That may be making it act like a glider instead of allowing it to turn "out of control" which may start the side to side glide. Thanks guys, this was a big help. At least I have a new direction to try. Musky Glenn

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This is really an interesting topic Glenn and I wish I could be of more help. Please keep us posted on your experiments. You seem to be breaking new ground here.

good luck,

Ben

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