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Kasilofchrisn

Curing Vinyl Paints?

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A few years ago I made some jigs and painted them with Super glow vinyl paint.

http://www.barlowsta...w-P961C132.aspx

I had trouble getting the paint to cure and I quit using it.

Now I mostly powder paint in a fluid bed.

The other day I found i still have some left and want to try using it up on some 10# downrigger weights I am going to make.

Do I need to cure this type of paint in my toaster oven?

I was thinking of doing it at low temps for say an hour or more.

Anybody have any insight on using this type of paint and getting it to cure properly?

Being the downrigger weights are so big I don't want to experiment too much and have to remelt them or clean that much paint off.

I think the downrigger weights are a bit too big to powder paint so I think this is a good option.

The goal is to make a few Glow downrigger weights for myself and a friend in Canada.

Thanks in advance.

Chris

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Vinyl paint doesn't need to be cured, if you put it in an oven even low temps will scorch the finish and the smell will give you the worst headache you ever had!! Seriously, the fumes are dangerous as well as flammable, just paint and let dry in room temp conditions and it you are going to pait something that is 10# you best let it dry somewhere out side the home.

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I think the problem he had in the past was not waiting 24hrs before letting the jigs come into contact. If done before this amount of time they will stick together. The other thing is the vinyl paint reacts with the soft plastics unless epoxy coated turning the paint into goo. For the downrigger balls I would air brush it on and let it sit for 24 hrs. Don't forget the white base coat if you want the paint to last. If you want to speed up curing you can use a heat lamp or a floor heater. I would not put them in an oven.

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Last time I used itwas on some 20 oz spire points and after 2 or 3 days hanging outside to dry in sunny weather they were still slightly tacky and never did dry completly.

I had them hanging apart from each other with no contact.

I was thinking of using a temp of 125* or less for say an hour or two. I wasn't thinking of the temps we use for powder coating by any means.

Where I live here in Alaska70* is a hot day so I thought using a little extra heat might help them cure properly.

I did use them with some skirts and rubber grub tails and that may have contributed to the problem.

I was also thinking of clear coating over the top of the vinyl paint.

What would be a good clear coat for something this size?

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It sounds like you may not be thinning enough. I personally still use the vinyl paint and can't say that I have any trouble with it drying. And a bonus is that if one chooses to use it in a closed room the fumes will cause the user to become rather intoxicated. Outside on a windy day is preferable for me. IMO another valuable attrobute in utilizing this paint is that one can mix different colors.

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It sounds like you may not be thinning enough. I personally still use the vinyl paint and can't say that I have any trouble with it drying. And a bonus is that if one chooses to use it in a closed room the fumes will cause the user to become rather intoxicated. Outside on a windy day is preferable for me. IMO another valuable attrobute in utilizing this paint is that one can mix different colors.

Wilfish, if you look at the paint he is using they specifically tell you not to thin unless spraying and even then it isn't desireable but they do tell you to stir frequently. A heat lamp of some type of ceramic heater would be better than the oven as the fumes would not be contained.

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I do have some of the thinner they sell for use with this paint. Like smalljaw said I would prefer to keep the thinning to a minimum as we are looking to attain the maximum glow potential.

Apparently making your downrigger weights glow is becoming popular in some areas so we are going to try it.

I think i will just find a way to keep the painted weight at or near 100* for a few hours of curing using a heatlamp or whatever I can make work on the cheap to give it some extra heat for help in curing.

Thyanks for the help guys.

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I found that when I sprayed vinyl paint I had to thin it at least 50/50 with a slow thinner or it would dry too fast and just spray spider webs and I always had to use a white base coat.

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If you go with the vinyl paints I would suggest a D2t epoxy top coat. After the balls are cured, mix up a batch paint it on and hang it. It will self level and leave you a very nice hard finish. If you have not used it before you will need to remove the drips as they form at the bottom. If you have the fin of the downrigger ball down it will be real easy to do. I would watch for drips forming for about 10 minutes after it is painted.

On the other hand if you wanted to get a simple glow ball in one step look at powder. With a cheap electrostatic paint gun you will get a perfect finish in one coat with no top coat needed. The powder is a uniform layer so there are no drips or runs. To get the best glow for your buck you could consider a white base coat but chances are you won't need it.

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Man that's a lot of D2t!

These weights are going to be made in the hilts fish shaped weight mold.

I have considered spraying powder on them.

Would be a good excuse for buying some new gear as I don't currently own a spray gun.

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Not really a little goes a long way. It can be brushed on very thin. As far as spray guns the electrostatic is the way to go for big stuff. That will give you the best coverage. With the powder air brush you need to keep you item hot. It works fine for blades and spoons but I wouldn't recommend it for down rigger weights

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Smalljaw I guess that the glow paint that Kasilofchrisn is obtaining from Barlows originates from Component Systems. They have been around as long as sliced bread. Their website actually has instructions for spraying, thinning and drying vinyl paint. They carry the "new and improved" glow vinyl in a few colors. This glow paint, I think, has to be "recharged" with a light source to cause it to actually continue to glow in the dark so using it for a downriggger weight will only have the "glow" effect for a limited period of time. I know that I am biased but imo a glow jig rather than a glow sinker might be more effective.

Basseducer, although I have used the vinyl for quite some time I have never gotten around to spraying it. However I have recently obtained a small gravity feed sprayer and I have a compressor and my hopes are that I will be able to at least prime the jigs with this spray technique and get away from the dipping thing? If you don't mind I would like to hear a bit from you on the techniques and results of your spraying the vinyl paint.

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wilfish,

I used an inexpensive external mix siphon air brush. That stuff is too thick for an internal mix brush, even when thinned it is still troublesome. I used low pressures in the twenty to thirty PSI range. I also used a slow thinner called Xylene Xylol made by Kleen Strip and thinned down to a 50/50 mix. There are also retarders on the market, but I haven’t tried them. It is very important to use their white base coat to get a good bond or else you can peel the paint off with your fingernail. I found that if I didn’t do these things the paint would spray like spider webs as it was drying in flight, I also had to hold the brush pretty close to the bait. Never did have any drying issues. After all that the results were good, the paint was tough and stood up to the usual rigors of bass fishing quite well. I stopped using it because the fumes are harsh and explosive, and the cleanup is messy. I switched to spraying powder paint and eliminated all those issues.

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The reason we want to make the downrigger weight in a glow is based on the recommendation from another forum.

The discussion was on whether or not I should coat/paint the weights or if it really matters.

At a minimum I was going to paint them but the question was what color.

I also toyed with the idea of using the dip it rubberized coating in a spray can.

A member of that forum from British Columbia mentioned that painting them in a glow color was becoming quite popular in his area.

I had a friend who showed interest in the glow also so I agreed to make him one for a small fee of course.

So even if the glow doesn't last it will still accomplish my goal of having a painted weight instead of bare lead.

Mainly so I am not handling a large piece of bare lead while fishing.

The hope was this Ultra Glow Vinyl being as bright as it is supposed to be would give a longer/better glow than a standard glow paint.

I guess now I just need to make some weights and get them painted and see how it goes.

Edited by Kasilofchrisn

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Kasilofchrisn

You said there is interest in the painted weights. Is that because they look better or that more fish are being caught on them? Then if you troll for longer than the glow period of the paint do you bring it in and recharge it? I have painted dropshot weights and haven't noticed any better results, but the fishermen like them.

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Kasilofchrisn

You said there is interest in the painted weights. Is that because they look better or that more fish are being caught on them? Then if you troll for longer than the glow period of the paint do you bring it in and recharge it? I have painted dropshot weights and haven't noticed any better results, but the fishermen like them.

I know the glow weights are popular in British Columbia. I don't know if they catch more fish using them or not merely that they are becoming popular there so we are going to give them a try here for the same species.

I would venture a guess they are catching more fish by using them or they wouldn't be making some of them down there. Maybre it is a fad that will eventually fade away who knows.

A lot of people prefer a painted or coated weight so they are not handling the lead and getting it on their hands etc. Some guys prefer a rubber coated weight for reducing the electrical signals from galvanic action etc.running down their downrigger wire which is why they often use a black box to adjust that.

King Salmon and Silver Salmon in saltwater are our main targets using the down riggers.

I am guessing that even when the glow wears out you would still have your flasher and bait behind the downrigger so it would be similiar to an unpainted weight in preformance at that time until you brought it in again.

With any luck you would be bringing the weight up often to reconnect after catching a fish.

Some people seem to have a favorite downrigger style and color that produces for them. Some are just looking for the next hot piece of fishing gear.

Either way I will still have a pair of painted downrigger weights and I don't think the glow can hurt my fishing.

I will do some more research when I have time and see why they like the glow weights.

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I was just curious about the reason. Just like anything else in this business you have to jump on the band wagon and ride it until it stops. I think I would hang the weight so that I could spin it and use a heat gun and my powder spray gun. JMHO.

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Basseducer, thanks alot for the info, it really does make sense that those siphon feed-external mix units are the way to go. I have yet to experience it but the clean up must be demanding spraying the vinyl. Still the units that you recommended seem to be cheap enough to give it a try. Oh and by the way that sure is a fine looking cat you have pictured.

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