pat28

Just To Say Thanks...

6 posts in this topic

Guys, I have been visiting this site over the past few years each time I had a few hours (yeah, say many) on my hands to build a few muskie plugs, and I have to say I have lways been impressed with the quality of the information here. I now try to add my very humble two cents worth whenever I can be of some use. So far, I have made a reef hawg knockoff that works so well I make it a point not to use it as it makes the catching too easy. No kidding on this one. I have also had good success with one out of three topwater designs I put together last year, although the action of the other two is fine and should prove useful sometime in the future. And finally, I am currently working on seven inch cranks for pike and muskie, and playing with all the variables. I have a bunch of twenty blanks sitting in the workshop, made out of basswood, cedar, birch and pine, sealed and waiting for their lexan lips and ballast to be installed. I am literally having a ball doing it, and it is all thanks to you.

Pat

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Good luck with your oncoming lureprojects , ........any experiences with birch in terms of water sepage or cracking up after having been exposed to moisture ?

I've read , that it would not be that well suited for outdoor use , .....made a slingshot out of a birch branch fork the other day ,....... found it so convinient to carve , so I'm thinking to pick a few branches from the woods for carving lures from it as well .

greetz , diemai :yay:

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For my gliders, I started out with maple and birch, two species that have a nasty reputation for splitting. But I have been lucky so far, after 4 years fishing with those. I sealed them with one coat of Nu-Lustre55, then primed and painted, and then sealed again with Nu-Lustre. Perhaps 10% of the 50 baits I made did end up with a minor crack, but these still work anyways.

I have also tested my first four crankbaits (basswood) in the unpainted version (and only one coat of sealer), and I am speechless. This operation was one of great luck, I know, but for those four, everything seems to have worked fine. I found out only two trebble hooks gave them a better balance, so I removed the middle one (out of 7-inch plugs, trebbles are 6/ 0 size), but it so happens that on the next 16 I had made, I had already decided to use only two hooks and had not added a third hanger. Now I still have to play with ballast in the remaining 16, especially as they are made of three more species of wood. I just love the personality of wooden plugs. I know they are not consistent, but I was brought up in a world of Suick lures that are never the same, and I have come to accept and love those differences between the plugs.

Pat

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@ pat28

Thanks a lot for your extensive reply , ....so I think , I'm gonna give it a shot on birch , ......at the fishing pond they downed some trees a while ago , some thicker branches still stacked up there so I could cut off some pieces .

I'm absolutely with you about the personality of timber plugs , though I've switched to PVC decking as my main luremaking material for a few years now , ....at least for smaller and medium sized crankbaits and swimbaits .

But for bigger baits timber is my first choice , one can chose between different species providing different grades of buoancy and density , .........big plugs of PVC would have to be overloaded with ballast , as the material is so much buoyant .

Thanks again , ......cheers , Dieter :yay:

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its great to have more folks adventure into lure building. what region are you in. pat28. when you find a wood species that gives you efficent results stay with it.

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Hi Woodie,

I live in Quebec City. I agree with you that I should stick to the wood species that give me the best results for a particular model, but as for crankbaits, this year was my first testing year, and thus I developed a jig to have all lures of the same shape and size, and tried four different species of wood. Now I know that basswood works well with the lip and ballast I put into the lure. But the testing is already half of the fun as you already know, and pretty soon I should be able to tell newbies about the effect of density with my new hands on experience. Just love this!

Pat

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