spoonpluggergino

Air Bubles In Envirotex Lite Solved

22 posts in this topic

This is more for the biginners like me. Prior to using Etec lite I was using Parks from Home depot, had some air bubles problem but not severe. I started using etec and I started to have some major problem with air bubles, could not get them out. I done lots of search watched some video nothing worked, I was very frusteted, but I found the the problem and solution.

Parks seems to be thinner than Etec. I picked up a shot glass and measured the ammount of Etec that I needed than I heated the glass and Etec very warm almost hot to the touch, than I stirred for two minutes like the instruction says. When the two minutes are up I blow heat right on top of the glass and keep it warm, than wait about a minute, I look down the glass and all the bubles are gone . The bottom of the glass is crystal clearn not a buble in sight. now is ready to be brushed on. The all process takes about 5 to 6 minutes

I know heat is not what is getting the bubbles out, but by making the etec viscosity less dense the bubles come up to the surface faster and you can exale on the bubles and break them up use a torch about six inches away and the carbon dioxide breaks up the bubles.

The main thing is heat the Etec almost hot to the touch, it works beatifully. You cannot use the clear plasic tiny cups the will destort and probably melt. No more bubles in my baits

Gino

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Carbon Dioxide breaks the bubbles. A torch or alcohol flame on low or simply breathing on it will pop the bubbles.

There is a product out there called "bubble buster" I think it is, not sure if it works with etex.

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for me the best way hands down has been to blow hot air on the baits while there on the turning wheel, i get a glass like finish every time. i think it works better too when your doing multiple baits at one time like i am usually, gives you more time to work with too.

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I tried heating Etex in a 750 watt microwave for 3 or 4 seconds to help the bubbles dissipate. Tried 5 seconds one time and it started setting up before I could get it brushed on the lure.

Ben

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Thanks Guys

I forget to mention to you guys that my basement it is very cold around 65 degrees, we like our home very cold, our daughter calls us the pinguins. Any way since I have been heating up the e-tex I have zero bubbles in my baits

Gino

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Gino are you using a heat gun to heat the glass?

Sounds like a great idea. How long is it taking for the lure to dry to touch?

Wondered if the heat is accelerating the curing process.

Vic

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I have been removing the air bubbles by vacuum. I built a small 3" by 6" vacuum chamber from ABS pipe and I have a hand automotive vacuum pump attached. Usually after pumping it down for about a minute the bubbles are gone.

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I just mix in a solo cup, and then heat it with a hair dryer, top and bottom, and then blow on it.

That seems to do the trick.

I typically mix only as much as I need to coat three swimbaits, and it doesn't become hard to apply even after I've heated it. If anything, it becomes more runny.

Edited by mark poulson

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Mark does it dry to touch faster than when not heated? Ben seems to imply that the heat speeds up the epoxy hardening. I wondered if anyone else noticed this effect.

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Mix up a small batch (few cc's) and nuke it for 5 or 6 seconds and see if you get the same results I did Vic. I know at 5 seconds in my microwave it was so hot it was uncomfortable to hold in your hand.

And yes, heat accelerates the curing process of epoxy. At least for D2T, Bob Smith and Etex. Initially it becomes thinner or more viscous, but continue to apply heat and it will speed up the curing process. The chemical reaction between parts A and B produce a small amount of heat. Pretty sure this has been discussed before.

Ben

Edited by RayburnGuy

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Thanks Ben. I am sure it has been discussed. I wondered how much time heating took off the 10hr dry to touch might save me? Faster would be better. Solarfall is applying heat the whole time on the wheel. I imagine this will speed up the process even more than just the intial heat . I wonder how much difference in hours? Many have heat lamps and heaters to speed the process along . I am just curious how much time one can save and pop a few bubbles at the same time?

Edited by littleriver

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hey Vic

My baits where looking really bad when I started using E-TEX, prior to this I was using Parks from Home Depot. Nothing wrong with Etex just not knowing what I was doing. My basement it really cold I checked the temperature and is 68 degree too cold for the E-TEX. This system I have now it is really sample and easy any one can do it

Two things I do I been using the same brush over and over. I keep the brush in a mason jar half full with acetone, when I am done brushing the bait I dip the brush in the acetone i wipe off the exess etex and put back in the jar for next time.

The second thing I use a shot glass that allows me to heat the etex, also when I am done I put a few drops of acetone and clean the shot glass for the next time.

I do one bait at the time, when I have multiple baits, you do not have to clean the glass every time, mix a new batch and do the next bait

PROCEDURE

I measure etex with syringes

pour in to shot glass

heat glass from the bottom up

heat the all glass

blast heat right on the top of the mixture

stir for two minutes with a small flat screwdriver

blast heat right on the ETEX when done mixing 5 to 10 seconds

all bubbles are gone in less than a minute

brush the baits

blow hot air on the baits

you nare done in less than 5 minutes

I put the baits on the wheel and I leave them to harden

These baitts finish they look professionally done

The reason I start heating the glass from the bottom due to warm air rises, I would say that the entire glass and etex is probably around 95 degree it is hot to the touch

Gino

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After posting this morning I did a little research on exactly how epoxy cures and what effects different temps have on it. Below, highlighted in red, is a copy of one part of a web page dealing with this subject. The link below the copied text is to the page I got the info from. Hopefully this will clear up any doubts on this subject.

Ben

Epoxy temperature

The warmer the temperature of curing epoxy, the faster it cures (Figure 1). The temperature of curing epoxy is determined by the ambient temperature plus the exothermic heat generated by its cure.

Ambient temperature is the temperature of the air or material in contact with the epoxy. Air temperature is most often the ambient temperature unless the epoxy is applied to a surface with a different temperature. Generally, epoxy cures faster when the air temperature is warmer.

Exothermic heat is produced by the chemical reaction that cures epoxy. The amount of heat produced depends on the thickness or exposed surface area of mixed epoxy. In a thicker mass, more heat is retained, causing a faster reaction and more heat. The mixing container's shape and the mixed quantity have a great affect on this exothermic reaction. A contained mass of curing epoxy (8 fl. oz. or more) in a plastic mixing cup can quickly generate enough heat to melt the cup and burn your skin. However, if the same quantity is spread into a thin layer, exothermic heat is dissipated, and the epoxy's cure time is determined by the ambient temperature. The thinner the layer of curing epoxy, the less it is affected by exothermic heat, and the slower it cures.

http://www.westsyste...epoxy-chemistry

Edited by RayburnGuy

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Thank you Gino for taking the time to share your process. I will be giving mine some heat soon. :worship:

I too store my brush in a sealed mason jar. Only difference I use isopropyl alcohol, strongest walmar carries, I prefer to it for clean up over acetone for several reasons. One, it works great! Two, it not so bad for your health as acetone. Three it smells better. Four is much cheaper and easier to find. Five works great to dilute the epoxy as well.

Ben thanks again. It's a fact then ,epoxy cures faster in the heat than the cold. I will be heatng things up here soon and find out exactly how much faster it cures.

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Just remember there are limits to everything Vic. Seems like I remember reading that heating the epoxy to too high of a temp could actually have an adverse reaction. That's why the recommended working temps are listed in the literature provided with the epoxy. The article quoted above said that if a shorter cure time was needed to use a faster hardener. I think the only difference in 5 minute and 30 minute epoxies is the hardener. The epoxy is the same for both.

This is a little out of my field of expertise and am only passing on what I have read.

Ben

Edited by RayburnGuy

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Ben Thank you for all the cautions!! I am a bit hard headed and have to see things for myself. Not sure why I even ask anything. I am going to try the extremes anyway. I do not have to tell you what happened??? Do I? :nono:

Well I had seven wake baits all laid out and ready to go. I can usually do around 10 baits at once(no heat) no problem. Still a few small bubble left in the epoxy after mixing and decided to give the old microwave a try. Heeding Ben's words of caution I went with 3 seconds. I swear 3 seconds seemed to do nothing. This is where I should have left the microwave and went on my merry way. But no :nono: I said to myself, "Ben does not have clue", let me hit it with another 5 seconds. Perfect!! Could really feel the heat coming off this Baby. Headed to the basement and with my no bubble hot solution and went to work. First bait went very well. Started on the second and noticed right away the epoxy seemed thicker. Before I could get half way through the epoxy was really gelling up. So much so I could hardly spread it. In a panic used alot of alcohol to give me a second or two but nothing was stopping this epoxy from hardnening short of a miracle from above. I managed to cover the bait but it was not pretty . I had enough epoxy for 10 baits in that cup and most of ended up on this one bait. :eek: Should make a great toothy bait if it still floats. :lolhuh:

Moral of the story, next time I will apply heat to the bait after the epoxy is on like solarfall suggests. Otherwise you may never get it on. Unless one is all you have to do.............

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Ben Thank you for all the cautions!! I am a bit hard headed and have to see things for myself.

No worries Vic. I'm the same way. There's one positive thing about it though. Lessons learned the hard way aren't easily forgotten. Here's another tip that might save you some headaches. Next time your experimenting just do it on a piece of scrap. It sure cuts down on the amount of aggravation.

Ben

p.s. Your "experiment" went exactly the way mine did when I first tried heating epoxy in the micro. No amount of alcohol is going to slow the curing process once it's reached that stage. Cleaning the brush was an effort in futility and it had to be thrown away as well.

Edited by RayburnGuy

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p.s. Your "experiment" went exactly the way mine did when I first tried heating epoxy in the micro. No amount of alcohol is going to slow the curing process once it's reached that stage. Cleaning the brush was an effort in futility and it had to be thrown away as well.

:lolhuh:

I was seconds from losing mine as well......Already had the words written in my head lamenting the loss of my good brush.......

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Hey Vic

I read your experiment and feel bad that it did not go so well. I forget to tell you that I use a painter heat air gun to heat the glass. I checked the temperature of the epoxy mix only gets to 80 degrees F, before I heat it is at 65 degrees. I only due one bait at the time even if I have multible baits

Best of luck , I am leaving for Canada for a week hopefully I catch a big muskie on my glide baits. I made 17 of them, would like to get some teet marks to see how good is the ETEX

Gino

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Good luck Gino on your fishing trip.

Don't feel bad. I learned something.

One heating the epoxy definetly shortens the dry time. I could touch the two I got covered in appx five hours instead of the usual ten.

Second Those two baits turned out to be the pertiest baits that have ever come off my turner. Out of the seven baits the two done your way turned out the best.

Thank you!!

Vic

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Carbon Dioxide breaks the bubbles. A torch or alcohol flame on low or simply breathing on it will pop the bubbles.

There is a product out there called "bubble buster" I think it is, not sure if it works with etex.

Salty, I can vouch for breathing on them. Works great!! Never tried this before but with this latest batch, just before placing the lures on the wheel, each one got a little blow job. "A happy ending" finally!! ................Thanks..............

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