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Seeking 56

Filling Lure Cavities

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Bought some plastic blanks, drilled out the rattles and filled the cavity with some PVC epoxy putty. What is every one else using to fill the cavity as this stuff is not readily available.

Thanks

s54

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Just a question, are you wanting a silent bait ? Wouldn't the epoxy you put in the vacant space change the buoyancy of the bait and make it heavier? Just wondering.

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I'm wondering the same thing. If you just want to silence the rattles, I would drill a small hole, center the rattle and fix it in place with superglue.

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This bait is over 10'' long. It has sectional chambers in the body and the BBs don't run through out the whole lure. Now that I think about it, the question I should've asked is with what would you plug the hole with?

The rattles in this crankbait are the size of BBs. It produces a high pitch sound. Don't get me wrong I love rattles but not the small ones. I repainted two of these baits with identical patterns and the one without rattles catches fish. I also have a different crankbait that produces a similar sound as this one to which has never caught anything either.

Most of my fish this year have come on silent baits.

The hole is 1/4'' in diameter.

So now, I will rephrase my question to, what would you plug the hole with?

Thanks

s54

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I forgot to mention that if the whole chamber was filled and due to the it's size, it wouldn't affect the action. I just don't want to use this expensive putty epoxy for this purpose.

s54

Edited by seeking 54

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Seeking 54

I started plugging all my holes with wood dowel pins. If your lure is plastic use epoxy on the dowel pin, works great

Gino

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On plastic bodies, I cut a round cap out of a soda can with scissors, superglue it over the hole, and sand the edges down so it disappears. That leaves the cavity as it was before you took out or added anything to it. Those are bass baits. Might the patch be pierced by a toothy critter? Maybe.

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The way I've done this is to inject/pour in a small amount of D2T, just a bit more than enough to fill the drilled out part, Then wrap teflon pipe thread tape around the outside of the bait to cover the hole and turn the bait over so the D2T flows down into the drilled part (against the teflon). In my case, I was adding rattles so I used a magnet to secure the BB's in a part of the bait that the glue never reaches. The teflon tape is non-stick so it peals away and leaves a smooth surface when the epoxy is set.

Edited by wchilton
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I seal holes in plastic lures with bondo.

I drill the holes in the top of the lures, so the filler won't affect the movement of the ballast or rattles I add.

Then I spread some bondo evenly on the sticky side of blue painters tape, and put it over the hole, smoothing it down as much as I can while it's soft, but not going crazy.

With the bondo sticking to the tape's adhesive, I can keep the bait sitting upright, with the loose balls away from the bondo, until it sets.

Then I remove the tape, sand down the bondo until only the round plug in the hole is left, wipe it down with acetone to clean the plastic, and add a drop of crazy glue to the bondo to make it stronger, and help it really stick to the sides of the hole.

If I do it right, there's very little bondo exposed below the level of the bait's plastic body, but it doesn't seem to matter if there is a small bump inside, since it's on the top, away from the moving balls.

I've done dozens of baits using this method, and I haven't had a failure.

Another advantage to having the filler in the back/top is that the darker part of the paint scheme is usually on the back, and it hides the bondo.

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