littleriver

Wood Filler

28 posts in this topic

I was wondering if anyone had any experience with "Famowood wood filler"? Thinking of trying but it comes in a solvent or water base. Not sure which would be best?

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What are you planning on using it for Vic? Maybe there is something that will work as well if not better.

Ben

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Vic are they the same company that makes the epoxy resin for the tabletops? I saw some in a lumber yard in the area where I work, just wondering.

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I use Elmer's indoor/outdoor water based wood filler in a squeeze tube. If I have to make a structural repair, like filling in an old lip slot, I use an epoxy putty log. On the seams of a split balsa bait, I use Elmer's indoor wood filler which looks and acts essentially like spackling compound. I figure you're covering any repair with undercoating, paint, and topcoating so the inherent strength of the filler is unimportant. The indoor Elmer's stuff sands very easily, which is good on a balsa repair since anything tougher is hard to sand smooth without distorting the surrounding soft balsa.

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Hi Ben, I am using to fill ballast holes. Use bondo now but would like something strong without mixing.

Hello Bassguy, No . I saw a similar product in a photo of a famous SC lure maker at work on his couch. His lures have held up well over the years. I think this maybe the product but not sure.

Thanks Bob, I have used the elmers . I wanted something that was more like wood. But definetly can appreciate the qualities you describe when working with balsa.

I will probably just go with the solvent base. I am thinking it will be more durable. Here is a like to exactly what i am talking about......

http://glazecoat.com/Famowood.htm

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Have you tried using super glue Vic? Just fill the hole and add a drop of accelerator and it sets up instantly. If you get the hole a little too full it's easily sanded off to a smooth finish. It's what I've been using to glue in ballast weights for a good while now and have had no problems.

Ben

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You know, I have not tried that Ben. But sounds like it would work pretty well. I will do it. Thank you For sharing this great idea Ben.

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I read somewhere that baking soda acts the same as commercial accelerators on super glue.

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My pleasure Vic. Mark is the one who told me about using super glue and since trying it I haven't used anything else. If you run into any problems, or have more questions, just holler and I'll try to help.

Ben

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I used solvent based Famowood for years when I built cabinets. It was great because it didn't shrink, and took stain well, and it came in lots of colors.

If you're using it as a filler only, but want it to be stronger, you can try adding a drop of runny super glue to it after you've sanded it to shape.

I do that with Bondo and it makes it much harder and stronger.

Edited by mark poulson

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Thank you Mark

Ad says it dries in 15 minutes. True? Any specific reason your not using as a hole filler? I

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It's been so long since I used Famowood that I didn't think of using it for lures. I seem to recall that drying time depended on thickness, since it dries by solvent loss, not by a chemical reaction like with bondo, and that deep depressions tended to shrink and need a second coat, and take a longer time to dry. Certainly longer than 15 minutes.

I'm sure Famowood will work for filling wood for sanding, and shallow dents or depressions, but I doubt that it would have the same strength as bondo, especially for larger areas.

I know bondo is both strong and totally waterproof, since it's used for auto body work, too.

Plus we use bondo a lot in exterior and interior wood restoration, so I have easy access to it.

Edited by mark poulson

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Thanks Mark for the information. As a bondo rookie, my biggest problem is getting the mix right. When making small batches, I often don't put enough hardner in and have to dig it out and start over. Or Ill have ten lures to do and put too much hardener in and have it set up before i am half done. Any suggestions on getting the perfect bondo mix?

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i use car body filler. elastic padding. but any brand does the job. easy sanded smooth. been useing it for a year now no problems at all.

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When I mix bondo, I add the red hardener a little at a time. The darker red the bondo mix, the faster it sets up.

Also, the more hardener you add, the more brittle the mix becomes.

I don't mix up a lot at a time, because it sets too quickly for that.

I shoot for a light pink color.

I try and leave it to set for at least half an hour to be sure it's hardened, and then I sand it down and add a drop of runny super glue to make it stronger.

I leave the wooden toothpick that I use to mix the two parts lying in the unused portion. When it's hard I know the bait is ready, too.

One thing that helps me in mixing is I do my mixing on a piece of tape on my work bench. I put the first part in one spot, and the hardener next to it, and then add hardener until the mix looks right. Once I'm done, I peel the tape off and throw it away.

I do that for mixing D2T too.

Someone here, I think it was Riverman, suggested mixing that way years ago, and it's made mixing and cleanup a snap for me.

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Mark , I know I keep saying it but thank you!! Can't wait to put these smalls to use. The devil is truly in the details and your cutting my time in a training diapers way down. 8O The tape idea is brilliant....... I am running out of pieces of cardboard. :eek:

Many Thanks to you all for I have many more great ways to skin this cat now..Thank you!!

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Everything I know about making lures I learned here on TU from other members, so I'm happy to "recycle".

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I've used the epoxy stick and had great success with it. Just slab off a little with a knife. Cut the slab into quarters or eighths. I just put the remainder on a piece of plastic and don't worry about it. Mix as you would a large piece and get an even color once your finished mixing, press into the hole and sand off the remainder once it's hard. 10 to 15 min. tops, ready to sand. I primer my baits before I paint and the epoxy takes the primer very well. Once it's painted, ta da, you can't see the repair. Just my .02.

Jerry

Edited by bassguy

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Thanks Jerry ..................Is there a specific brand that you prefer? I have used some that require meading with your fingers. If this is the one, I found it to be messy and time consuming having to mead each batch. Really stuck to my fingers too.

Vic

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It's all sticky Vic, just the nature of the beast. I'm not sure of the brand but it may be Devcon, I could be mistaken. I ran into the same problem but kneading a small piece the size of pea wasn't an issue. A little acetone cleaned up my fingers pretty quickly.

Jerry

Edited by bassguy

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Update

I read somewhere that baking soda acts the same as commercial accelerators on super glue.

Jdee, I believe you read this on wikapedia . After a google of super glue accelerators, i read the same thing. I gave the method a go last night and was pleasantly surprised with the results. I first tried filling the cavity with superglue then adding the baking soda. Not so good result but the soda definitely worked as an accelerator. Next I filled the cavity with the soda and added a drop or two of super glue. Very nice result this time. Hard as bondo ;waterproof too but in a fraction of the time. No mess to boot or guessing the mix. I like this as a filler over everything I have tried so far. Speed, mess, finish, cost, availability, durability and just about anything else I could think of. It is super hard; so on first sanding I use a file to get down to the bait and finish with sandpaper. I do the same on bondo and works well. If it holds paint, I think it is a winner .

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Update

Jdee, I believe you read this on wikapedia . After a google of super glue accelerators, i read the same thing. I gave the method a go last night and was pleasantly surprised with the results. I first tried filling the cavity with superglue then adding the baking soda. Not so good result but the soda definitely worked as an accelerator. Next I filled the cavity with the soda and added a drop or two of super glue. Very nice result this time. Hard as bondo ;waterproof too but in a fraction of the time. No mess to boot or guessing the mix. I like this as a filler over everything I have tried so far. Speed, mess, finish, cost, availability, durability and just about anything else I could think of. It is super hard; so on first sanding I use a file to get down to the bait and finish with sandpaper. I do the same on bondo and works well. If it holds paint, I think it is a winner .

That's a great idea! Thanks for sharing.

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Your welcome Mark.

Superglue and baking soda are pretty much always on hand. Who knew they could be so great together................

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