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fishnart

Automotive Clear

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I asked this in the rod repair but I'll ask it here too, can someone tell me how you apply automotive clear? I think some of you use it on baits?? I was thinking of painting a reel. Thanks in advance

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Yes you can use automotive clear on baits, reels furniture but not on the dog or cat. They won't sit still long enough.

Try using the search function on this web site and other tackle sites. Much has been written about which automotive clear people like to use and bait prep. As to how first follow manufactures recommendations for mixing and applying. The baits should have their paints jobs dryed or cured completely. And wear proper personal protection -gloves and mask as some auto clears aand solvents have some stuff in it that is not good to breath. After all the dog and cat aren't as dumb as one might think.

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There are three parts to automotive urethane clear:

1. clear

2. reducer

3. activator

Normally you buy the clear by the quart. At least that is the smallest amount that I have seen that you can buy. The reducer is a thinner and the activator causes the stuff to harden.

To really get the good stuff you will be putting out around $100.00 to $150.00 for all of it combined. If you get the cheap stuff then it will peal and flake off quickly.

Shoot it through an airbrush after it is mixed according to the instructions on the clear can or ask the guy at the paint store to recommend how to mix it. I start shooting at 30 PSI and adjust from there.

You will probably shoot 2 or 3 coats. Be very careful about building up the clear where frame parts meet, bearings get inserted, and where knobs turn. Spray it too thick and nothing will fit or turn.

Now for the safety part. All urethane and lacquer paints, clears, and thinners contain isocyanates. (I guess I spelled that right). Isocyanates can cause cancer, asthma and all kinds of other lung and respiratory problems. Also, these types of paints and clears do not dissolve with water. Soooo, you want to make sure that you wear an approved filter mask when you shoot this stuff. THERE IS NO FILTER AVAILABLE that will filter Isocyanates. I don't care what anyone claims or tells you. So you are going to suck that up. However, the proper filters will stop the paint and clear particles from entering your lungs. This is important because this type of stuff does not dissolve with water. Therefore, any paint or clear that you ingest will not dissolve and go away. Also, definitely wear protective gloves. Clears are really sticky and don't come off of the skin very easily. Clears (along with all of the other stuff that you mix with it) have a very strong oder. Make sure that you shoot this stuff in a well ventalated area. If you don't you will feel like you just drank some moonshine out of a gallon shot glass.

Shooting this stuff is not as bad as it sounds. Don't be afraid to try it. It is just that there are some precautions that one needs to take that is necessary before doing it. Hope this answered some of your questions.

Skeeter

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I don't shoot thru an airbrush but use a mini-gun. I use strong solvents. Hot lacquer thinner for starts. For some airbrushes that don't state specifiically that the o-ring-seals are solvent proof will eventually have a hard time with solvents like MEK, Lacquer thinner and such.

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Thanks guys for taking the time to write such an involvled response. It was very informative. Now I have to decide if its worth it. Maybe I can paint them and pay someone with experience to clear coat them for me lol lol. It does sound very intimidating and a little expensive for me to just play around with some old reels I have. Thank you so much again...

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Cougarftd,

You clean the gun with lacquer thinner or acetone. It is no different than cleaning your airbrush after painting something.

Skeeter

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