FolsomFishing

Reference For Turning Wood

7 posts in this topic

Hey all, I just became interested in making my own wood lures and I'm a complete beginner with turning wood. I've done some research on the net and also watched a ton of tutorials on YouTube and I'm just about ready to purchase some equipment. Can any of you guy make recommendations on the features (horsepower engine, rpm, etc..) I would want on a beginners lathe. I'd like to make lures up to 6" long and 1/2 - 2" in diameter. Does brand matter?

I have the same questions about the chisels as well.

If anyone can recommend any good resources as well I'd be truly grateful. I'll be completely self taught on using this machine. I assume that to get started using some cheap wood like pine would be best to learn on, but that's just my thinking.

Thanks for any advice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While a inexpensive lathe will work, I would consider spending a little more for something that will last you possibly the rest of your life. I have a delta midi lathe that does everything I need it too. They also offer a bed extension if you want to turn larger projects. It will set you back a bunch, but well worth it. Look at rockler.com or woodcraft.com.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey all, I just became interested in making my own wood lures and I'm a complete beginner with turning wood. I've done some research on the net and also watched a ton of tutorials on YouTube and I'm just about ready to purchase some equipment. Can any of you guy make recommendations on the features (horsepower engine, rpm, etc..) I would want on a beginners lathe. I'd like to make lures up to 6" long and 1/2 - 2" in diameter. Does brand matter?

I have the same questions about the chisels as well.

If anyone can recommend any good resources as well I'd be truly grateful. I'll be completely self taught on using this machine. I assume that to get started using some cheap wood like pine would be best to learn on, but that's just my thinking.

Thanks for any advice

First of all, let me say hello. I see that you're in Cal. I'm guessing NorCal because of the Folsom in your handle. I'm also in NorCal, SF. You're more that welcome to see my set up if you want. I also am a self taught wood turner. I learned mostly from watching YouTube. Buying a couple of wood turning dvd's by Richard Raffan.

Now, onto your questions. I had the same ones when I decided that I wanted to make my own lures.

Lathes

When I first started reading/researching the forums. The most mentioned name was the Jet 1014 mini lathe. It was pretty much the standard. It has a 1/2 horse power. The other lathes were; Rikon mini - which coincidentally is on sale at WoodCraft. The Penn State Industries mini lathe, which is essentially a Jet clone. And the same lathe could be found at Harbor Freight. Any of these lathes should be more than adequate for turning lures in the dimensions you stated.

Turning Tools

For turning just wood lures or plugs I would recommend at the least getting a roughing gouge, parting tool and/or skew. For the majority of my turnings, I get by just by using the roughing gouge. You should get the High Speed Steel(HSS) turning tools. You can get the Benjamin's Best turning tools from Penn State Industries. And the Wood River turning tools from WoodCraft. Or if your budget allows, you could get the Robert Sorby tools. There are more high end turning tools e.g. Easy Rougher, Crown Pro etc. etc. But for just making plugs...........I guess it's your call.

Sharpening

Now, having mentioned the tools. It would behoove you to learn how to sharpen your turning tools. I think that this is one of the most important aspect of wood turning. You need to learn how to sharpen your lathe tools in order to be a proficient wood turner. Also, the sharper tools make it easier to remove wood from the turning.

Like aaron4mvp mentioned, I think that you need to go visit WoodCraft or Rockler if you haven't yet. They both have locations here in Nor Cal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you've never turned, I'd suggest you take a turning class at either a community college or at one of the woodworking supply stores in your area.

My father was a lathe hand, and I learned to turn wood on a small machinist's lathe, which was very precise and easy to use.

Wood turning lathes are a little different.

Turning looks deceptively simple, but there are tricks to it, like everything else worth doing in life.

There are also dangers, so learning from someone who knows how to turn will save you a potentially painful learning curve.

And learning how to turn before you invest in a machine will help you in making the proper decisions for your equipment selection.

Edited by mark poulson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the replies and advice. I think the idea of taking a class at a local woodshop is a great idea before I dump a bunch of cash on this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now