jt_ncbassman

Newbie With Alot Of Questions

11 posts in this topic

Hello folks, Ive been tinkering with balsa lures for over a year now, but the past few months Ive really been trying to build them from scratch. I have been reading the forums for a while, but I have some questions I need to ask and hope somebody can take some time to help me.

1. Initial sealing of the balsa blank. I have had decent success using D2T from start to finish. But I just recently ordered a batch of "medium weight" balsa from specialized balsa that looks and feels okay/normal. But when I seal the blanks with the D2T, after about 15 minutes I get terrible air bubbles all over the bait, it's almost like the wood is releasing air into the layer of Epoxy. I only have this problem with these particular blocks of balsa... any ideas? I noticed that this balsa looks a little more "stringy" and "hairy" than most.

2. Can somebody reccomend me an air compressor around 100$ that is quiet, compact, and will run just enough air to keep one airbrush running. Also, if someone would be so kind, to tell me what parts/adapters/regulators, etc. I need to buy. I'm not doing anything fancy, I typically only airbrush one day of the week, and I will usually do a few baits in a day.

Really appreciate any help, thanks.

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Harbor freights has a 1/5 hp compressor that is very quiet and does the job. It come with a water trap. you can use the bottom screw as a regulator. It comes with a cheap airbrush as well

They also have 1/8hp but with a regulator but I didn't care for the coil typ hose. I could see my airbrush crashing to the floor.

http://www.harborfreight.com/air-tools.html?CatPath=All%2BProducts%252F%252F%252F%252FAir%2BTools%2F%2F%2F%2FAir+Compressors&RequestData=CA_CategoryExpand

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The balsa IS releasing bubbles into the epoxy. It may help a little if you thin the epoxy a little with denatured alcohol before applying it. Coating the bait with super glue which dries quickly is also a good solution. Anything you do to heat up the bait after applying the epoxy will force bubbles out, so try to avoid that.

Compressors: I'd make sure the compressor is rated for at least 60 psi. I've never found a "quiet" compressor, just some that make less noise than others. But never one that I'd want running inside the house with family members around. Some high priced airbrush models advertise lower noise levels but that doesn't include any in the $100 range.

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What I use for an air compressor is a 15gal Cambell Hausfield (sp?) that I let run outside to fill, then bring in to my paint room to paint with. I can get at least 4 or 5 baits, depending on air pressure used and how many colors to the pattern. Hope this may help a little. I have a small airbrush compressor, but can't stand the noise and cutting on and off while I'm painting baits.

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I have to say that the HF 1/5 hp compressor is pretty darn quiet. It can be used inside the house in a room next to a sleeping baby.. It isn't silent, but queit enogh that I can talk to someone on the speakerphone while using it and they would not be able to tell. It cuts off at 58 psi and top working pressure is about 30psi. The only Wreatex Paint that I have trouble shooting unthinned with a .3 or .35 nozzle is createx White Pearl. For that I just pull the needle back a little bit.

I paint early and I cannot use a noisy compressor to fill a tank. I work on a dozen baits at a time every day of the week. The key to making these cheaper compressors last is to shut them off in between spraying. I burnt out a few by not shutting it off. After I've gotten into the habit of shutting it off, I've probably painted 1,000 baits with this one compressor. I have one in the box ready to go if this dies. I like it that much. It's something like $80-90 and comes with a crappy airbrush which can be used for base coating.

Edited by 152nd Street Baits

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I really appreciate everybodys advice, I'm going to order one of the Harbor Freight compressors right now. I've got all these baits that run perfect in the bathtub ready for paint and all I've got is a cheap Paasche with some compressed air cans. I'm gonna spend some time with the super glue and see if that works for me. I just sealed a few more fat body baits with D2T and no bubbles.

I'm still looking for a good all around airbrush. I don't think I need one with super fine detail capabilities.... just one that is reliabe, consistent, and give me nice even coats without "blowing chunks" like this one. Any suggestions are surely appreciated.

Thanks again for the responses,

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for an airbrush i would reccomend an iwata eclipse cs - its my main workhorse brush and i havent found anything i wanted to do it would not do (my abilites are another story lol) - its not the fanciest or most expensive one but its also not the cheapest one and its a brush you can keep using no matter your skill level i belive - i reccomend coast airbrush to order one - great prices and i have found their customer svc to be stunningly good one any question i had - always pleasant and easy to work with and able to answer any question i had about the products

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Mark, I think it would since the cooling bait would tend to draw in versus push out air.  There's also the consideration that curing epoxy is an exothermic chemical process.  It's not so noticeable with slow cure epoxies, but it is.  I regularly use D2T for undercoating and I do get occasional small bubbles.  When I began thinning D2T slightly with DA and using a fine artist's brush to apply it, many of the problems disappeared.  And to me, a few small bubbles are no big thing because I sand the epoxy before painting to provide a better bond and remove any bubble bumps at the same time.

 

The time to correct problems in finish is when they "pop up" :wink:   I strive for a really smooth finish and epoxy undercoating is a great way to get it.  Epoxy is tough, it's waterproof, and it's chemically inert when cured, which makes bad reactions with solvent based topcoats like MCU a non-issue.  One thing for sure - problems in a finish layer will usually 'print through' to the final finish so it's best to fix it right away - whatever that takes.  Sand out bumps.  If you thinned your epoxy too much and it soaked completely into end grain areas and left rough patches, sand them smooth and re-coat the entire lure.  Fixing goofs is just part of the hobby.       

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you might try a few light coats of clear acrlic spray to seal your lures it drys fast and can be applyed about every 15 min what i do is spray a light coat and let it dry then a light sanding with a 3m sanding pad then reapply another coat when its dry i paint the lure and spray another coat over the painted bait then when its dry apply the d2 and havent had prob. with bubbles

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