CincyFisher

Rounding Over Sides Of Flat-Sided Cranks

6 posts in this topic

I have begun making a few crankbaits for the first time.  I have traced out the pattern I like and use my bandsaw to cut the shape out of 1/2" poplar craft boards.  I have been running them across my router table fitted with a roundover bit.  I know it's a matter of time that I roundover a thumb or finger so I'm looking for a better approach.  I thought about sanding but I don't have a good bench sander and I'd like as much consistency to the baits as I can.  Anyone else run into this?  These are small baits with a length of 2" without lip.  I've attached a picture for reference.

 

Thanks in advance for any advice.

 

Bryan

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TU member Hazmail came up with this:  use a bench grinder.  Attach a pulley wheel and glue sandpaper into its groove.  You can use it to sand the top or bottom to the profile inside the pulley groove.  I use a more hands-on approach:  take a compass and trace lines on the bait for where you want want to cut facets on the belly and shoulders of the bait.  Use a very sharp wood carving knife (the Murphy Knife is excellent) to cut the facets, then blend them into the rest of the body with a Dremel or Foredom sanding cylinder.  No, it isn't as exact as a router and it takes longer to do.  But I still have all my finger tips.  Cutting the facets with a knife is just a time saver and it eliminates putting a lot of sawdust into the air.

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BopP,

  Your info is not exactly correct about Hazmail's sander. He was at my house 4 or 5 years ago after one of our TU Get-togethers and we built one. It is not a true pulley but a disc with a rounded groove turned on a lathe to the porfile that you want. Then, the sandpaper is glued onto that.

 

Gene

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Possibly a block with two or three pointed pins/needles set at about 1mm. You press down the block, onto the blank and manouvre around the router plate. This will keep your fingers away from the cutter.

 

I had a little go at this solution but was not successful, the pins were too thick. Something like sewing pins would probably work better. Keep the block short, you only need to be deep enough to keep your fingers comfortably clear, this will give you more control.

 

By the time you have sealed, sanded and undercoated, the holes will not be visible.

 

Depending on how well the blank slides on the router plate, a dusting of talc or fine sawdust will help. I made a polycarbonate plate cover for my router. This was tighter on the cutter and gave more stability for the smaller stuff.

 

If you try this route or find another solution, don't forget to feedback both positive and negative.

 

Dave

Edited by Vodkaman
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Dave - that's a great idea and I can't believe I didn't think of it.  I use similar techniques on the jointer with a tacky push block.  I bet a block with 60 grit sand paper glued to it would work too.  I will be cutting more blanks soon and will let you all know how it worked. Thanks!

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