Jump to content
RiverMan

How Dangerous Are Lacquer Based Paints?

16 posts in this topic

I haven't ever used lacquer based paints and clears and wondering how toxic this stuff is if used with a good spray booth and vent system. Also, anyone using water based paints with auto clears as top coat?

Thanks,

RM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

jed. you need ventilation. we have used lacquers over 25 years.. it sparays well,dry,s fast and does excellent when covered with automotive clears on plastic baits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i cant speak on the laquer but i have been using auto clear over water based paints such as createx and auto air until recently when i joined the "solarez revolution". I had no problems with adhesion for the most part, but i like the solarez much better now after using both.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No doubt lacquer paints offer a wide variety of colors and advantages in terms of drying time, but, as I have gotten older, I stay away from all sovent based paints, if I can.

The fumes from lacquer paints are nasty, and probably toxic.  We used to think it was a cheap high when I was a teenager, but the headaches you got from it were ferocious.

I worked on construction sites where lacquer was sprayed without protection, before the AQMD or EPA, or whoever, outlawed using them without a controlled spray booth.

We also used solvent based contact cement to adhere plywood paneling to drywall in office buildings and homes, back in the day.

The fumes got so bad we had to go outside to sober up, and let the rooms vent, before we continued.

Use an activated charcoal filter respirator mask, store it in a sealed plastic bag so the charcoal doesn't keep absorbing stuff from the surrounding air, and change the filters often.  They are no good once the charcoal has absorbed it's limit.

Whatever you decide to do, be careful.  Once your lungs have been damaged, you're screwed for life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have used lacquer for a long time with zero problems. I tried water base paints when I started and they suck to me. I put a fan outside the door of my shop and let it pull some air out I don't use a mask or anything like that its not like your painting a car you a only spraying a very small amount of paint. I wouldn't spray lacquer in the house but if you have some air moving you'll be fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How dangerous is anything?  You know, water can kill you and it is found in every cancer cell ever found.  OK, is the water the cause of cancer, or ..........  don't answer that, I already know.

 

But, what about solvent based paints.  The advantages are noted and can't be argued.  I love the smell of the solvent, which means it is probably a very bad thing. :argue: My wife will tell you how bad it is....

 

Here is my thoughts on it.  If you use a paint booth, with adaquate air flow, then you probably will suffer from lack of paint control.  If you use a paint booth and an approved mask, then vent the fumes outside, then you will never have a problem.  If you are like me, and you can limit the amount of solvent based paint you use, then a simple fan in the window will probably be enough for the few times you use it a month.

 

The problem is simple, we live in the land of lawyers.  We are stuck with over reactive people who need to find ways to keep the lawyers busy with law suits.  Because of this, I will tell you you must wear an approved NIOSH mask, with a paint booth, with air flow.  I will also tell you that you MUST do as I say, and NOT AS I DO. :halo:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Highly Toxic!! I just lost a friend a few months ago.He was one darn fine auto painter,over thirty years in auto shop Lung Cancer and COPD due to painting  with auto paints.Probably from not using a mask early on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love the lacquer! Get one of those cheap portable booths. One of these comes with a slim exhaust attachment that fits nicely into a window. No fuss.

Spraying a bunch of clearcoat is where you run into problems. Simply because more of it is being used and there is much more overspray. This I wont do indoors. I got away from spraying clearcoat. Too many safer and better alternatives. Cheaper too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have always worn a respirator when I spray. Laquers and Urethanes do not dissolve with water. So if you get the stuff in your lungs enough you could be in trouble. It won't dissovle. Thinners contain isocanaytes. It is a vapor and there is no commercial respirator filter out there to stop it. This, they warn, causes cancer. But guys that spend their lives in spray booths are the type to have health problems with this stuff. As a hobby painter you don't need to worry if you take the proper precautions. Good ventilation and a respirator is all you need. Once you start shooting lacquer, you won't go back to water based anything.

 

Skeeter

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have always worn a respirator when I spray. Laquers and Urethanes do not dissolve with water. So if you get the stuff in your lungs enough you could be in trouble. It won't dissovle. Thinners contain isocanaytes. It is a vapor and there is no commercial respirator filter out there to stop it. This, they warn, causes cancer. But guys that spend their lives in spray booths are the type to have health problems with this stuff. As a hobby painter you don't need to worry if you take the proper precautions. Good ventilation and a respirator is all you need. Once you start shooting lacquer, you won't go back to water based anything.

 

Skeeter

What's up my friend? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use House of Color, automotive paints and I have to say the fumes are nasty, require lacquer thinner to clean brushes which also stinks, and above all else, if you are using a spray booth, MAKE SURE it is an intrinsically safe booth, i.e. that there is no possibility of sparks in the moptor igniting the flamable fumes....BOOM BOOM goes your shop....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In terms of personal health, if you are in good shape with no preexisting respiratory issues or a smoker then the risk is low assuming you follow good ventilation and and protection practices.

 

Exposure to something like this becomes an issue when it is repeated and sustained over the long term. We inhale all sorts of things on an ongoing basis and for the most part our lungs can manage this. However when we inhale toxic items over the long term in concentration our lungs don't have any chance of rejuvenating.

 

Another poster mentioned that our lungs have no ability to remove or break down the lacquer crystal. From that conclude that the build up of long term exposure is worse than with items that we do break down and process. It is this "build up" that leads to disease.

 

It will happen with any excessive exposure, it just happens to be worse with some, lacquer is one of them. Not as bad as asbestos but easily on par with chronic smoking when exposure is sustained, if you need a real world comparison.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One important thing to remember is that the reason lacquer fumes get you "high" is that the are absorbed into the blood stream through the lungs, and so pass through your liver as it cleans your blood.

All in all, while a healthy person may be at less risk, there is no rational reason for not using both breathing protection and proper ventilation if you are going to spray any solvent based paints, and especially lacquer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Riverman,

 

Don't sweat it. Just get a mask and shoot the stuff. You are not going to die. You will love the stuff.

 

jwfflipper,

 

I am doing just fine bud.  What are you doing in LA?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×