biggamefish

Feather Lite Resin

17 posts in this topic

Hey guys,

 

I pick up some feather lite couple months ago to do some resin baits, I went with feather lite because I was looking for a resin that would float and feather lite was the only one I found to float without having to add the mb's because the mb's were already added into feather lite.

 

Now im getting close to the process of casting my bait with this feather lite stuff, so thought that I go back online and do some more searching, wel I have found that this material have alot of mix reviews on it's durability, not sure if its the product itself or just the users error, I didnt want to fish and throw a bait that would have things flying off lol or breaking in half if I ever cast into some rocks, anyone here have more experience with this material?

 

I really like the idea of not having to add the mb's to make it float because I could imaging how difficult it would be for me to find the right mb's to resin ratio, but if there's a much more durable resin that does require to add mb's, then I will look forward to that if theres no other way around to this feather lite stuff.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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thanks for your reply jrhopkins

 

I have a few more questions as im still new to this product, how long are you guys waiting for this stuff to cure before painting? are u guys light sanding before primer or just paint straight on? if primer, what primers are ideal?

 

also herd some guys bake this stuff to make it cure faster, what are some steps to this?

 

please anything I need to know about it let it be known lol thanks!!

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This has been debated but it's my opinion that featherlite is nothing more than PU resin and microspheres added for filler and buoyancy.

 

Less filler would increase strength decrease buoyancy. mixing your own could help you find the balance you're looking for.

 

I never did any post curing (baking)

My casts always need sanding to knock down the texture. Sometimes a final glaze filler is needed for filling in small voids from the microbaloons.

 

TU Member "Coley" makes the best looking featherlite baits I've seen & they're a solid bait for bass.

I'd have no worries boating a fish w/ it but of course the one I have from him will never see water :)

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I haven't used featherlite. I experimented with PU and MB's, as explained by Redg8R.

 

I did drop one on a tiled kitchen floor and it snapped. I then did a test and cast a few on a concrete carpark and none of them broke. The trailing line slows the flight velocity down a lot, lightening the impact. You have a couple of hooks too that will likely prevent a full contact. Plus, a top coat of epoxy will also add integrity and some damping of the contact forces. If the lure strikes a sharp edge of a rock, it will likely be damaged or even snap. Best cast into the water :)

 

I had a lot of success with the PU and MB's. Using a gram scale, I could get consistency and accuracy of my required buoyancy. It is most important to keep records or you would be wasting your time. It doesn't require much effort to arrive at the required mix. To measure the density that you have is so simple, do a TU search on Archimedes, here is my post on the subject.

 

Dave

Edited by Vodkaman

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Okay thanks guys, what i notice while experimenting with this stuff, I casted a few already and while I was messing around putting in screw eyes and sanding, Ive dropped some of them a few times by accident onto hard concret floors and have not seen anything happen, i also baked some in 175 degree oven for an hr and they came out feeling a bit harder, still not much serious test done yet but i hope it turns out good.

 

on a side note im thinking about doing the resin and adding mb thing if this stuff fails lol.

 

oh and Dave I really like the achimedes thing, will give that a try when ballasting thanks 

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I'm hoping to get a lab dryer/oven soon.  I'm not sure if it would help with hardness, but I'm sure some low heat (like you said, 150-175F) may help de-gas the lures much faster. 

 

I had featherlite when I first started to do the resin thing.  It was okay, but I always made a huge mess mixing the stuff.  I found that I like adding filler separately, but I still make a mess! 

 

I'm still searching for the perfect resin.  Very finicky products.  I have an unintentional habit of moving across the country every couple years.  One thing is certain, different climates make resins do very different things.  Humidity is disasterous!  When I lived in Oregon, I couldn't get a consistent pour for the life of me in the winter months.

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... as for hardness.  Eye screws are more than suitable for bass lures.  I put a little super glue on the threads.  On the lures that are "duds" I try to salvage hardware.  About half the time, the lure breaks in half before the screw comes out (and thats using about a 1" twisted wire screw).  If you are making big lure, put the longest screw you can in it.  Pouring a through-wire lure is a PITA and tends to reduce mold life from the extra crevices to hold the hardware.

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You can get to those temperatures with a wooden box and a couple of 150W bulbs.

 

Dave

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it's free 

And I can pop a cheap pizza in too ;)

I just have to write out some Celsius to Fahrenheit  conversions, and maybe find out what it was used for.

Thing looks old enough to be Marie Curie's easy bake oven!  :D

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I'm hoping to get a lab dryer/oven soon.  I'm not sure if it would help with hardness, but I'm sure some low heat (like you said, 150-175F) may help de-gas the lures much faster. 

 

I had featherlite when I first started to do the resin thing.  It was okay, but I always made a huge mess mixing the stuff.  I found that I like adding filler separately, but I still make a mess! 

 

I'm still searching for the perfect resin.  Very finicky products.  I have an unintentional habit of moving across the country every couple years.  One thing is certain, different climates make resins do very different things.  Humidity is disasterous!  When I lived in Oregon, I couldn't get a consistent pour for the life of me in the winter months.

 

Heating isocyanate urethane can be extremely dangerous if it has recently been poured. Most polyurethane mixes use MDI or TDI which are both forms of isocyanate and under normal temperatures have relatively low vapor pressure (especially MDI) but at higher pressures they can vaporize and pose a serious health threat. In fact, studies have shown that even organic respirators are not effective in removing isocyanates. You need either a full mask supplied air respirator or more logically a hood with at least 50 cfm of flow away from you. 

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Heating isocyanate urethane can be extremely dangerous if it has recently been poured. Most polyurethane mixes use MDI or TDI which are both forms of isocyanate and under normal temperatures have relatively low vapor pressure (especially MDI) but at higher pressures they can vaporize and pose a serious health threat. In fact, studies have shown that even organic respirators are not effective in removing isocyanates. You need either a full mask supplied air respirator or more logically a hood with at least 50 cfm of flow away from you. 

Very good to know.  Thanks.  How long after the curing process could low heat be applied?

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Very good to know.  Thanks.  How long after the curing process could low heat be applied?

 

I couldn't say for sure, but assuming you are within 2 weight percent on the measurement of part A and part B after 7 days the risk is less. That timeframe is based on when the cured resin reaches its full strength. If you have less accurate measurements of part A and B you could vaporize isocyanates no matter how long after cured. 

 

Most manufacturers of polyurethane parts use a heat curing process step and its benefits are obvious, but if you do this it is essential to have a good system to remove fumes. A solution I have explored is using a bathroom vent and enclosing the "oven" with a hood with a dryer vent going outside. 

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If the vapors/fumes are combustible, be sure and use a kitchen hood fan which is explosion proof, not a bath fan.

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