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John Kleinbauer

Making Lures with a Homemade CNC machine

29 posts in this topic

Gang,

I sell plans for making cheap homemade CNC machines. I am getting alot of Emails asking about cutting out Lures using a CNC machine. If you go over to one of the RC groups you will see I helped people understand how to build a CNC machine and cut out RC planes. I did this because my mailbox was getting loaded with people asking if it could be done. Now there are lots of people cutting out Balsa planes with CNC.

So in order to help out I will answer some basic CNC questions here.

Please keep each message to one question. I am not here to sell plans I am here to connect the hobby of CNC to Lure making. I never made a Lure using my CNC machine. But I have made Lures out of quarters in my younger days. I know what a lure is and I know just how much work is involved to make one. Ask away.

John Conrad Kleinbauer

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John- I am quite dumb on this topic, but just how could your machine plans help me produce a lure off of one I have already carved?

Thanks

Tally

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John- I am quite dumb on this topic' date=' but just how could your machine plans help me produce a lure off of one I have already carved?

Thanks

Tally[/quote']

Tally,

CNC requires you to draw the part in CAD. If someones hands you a Lure you would have to draw it up and create several drawings in CAD.

You could make the Lure in two halves. Cutting out the Lure as a one piece 3D shape requires expensive software and a expensive machine. Lures can be made like I said in two halfs with a Homemade machine. CNC is really for production of a part. CNC is a hobby in itself. If you took the time to learn CNC and draw the drawing and put it towards just making the Lures, you would have alot of Lures for sale. I have been in this field for 4 years. Some people are over selling CNC. CNC is a time saver in certain cases.

John

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Hi John,

I posted a link to your site earlier for those interested in getting into homebrew CNC, that may be where the emails come from :oops: . Ive been a fan of your site for some time now & your clients have made some great looking machines.

We have a few members who use professional machinery, but one in particular has built one from a kit MAXCNC (I think). anyway he machines his lure bodies in 2 parts from urethane foam block.

As to my question.... I notice you have designed a "4th Axis" bolt-on for one of your machine designs. how well would you think that would work for making 1 piece wooden baits?

Ive been working on & off for a few years now trying to make a homebrewed duplicating machine from affordable & easy to aquire parts.

I gotta admit some of the references from your site inspired me quite a bit even though the machine I vision wont be using any computer controllers.

I'll be sharing what Ive come up with in this forum shortly, your free to critique it when you find time.

take care,

redg8r

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redg8r,

The problem with a Forth axis is software. Ideally you want to draw something and have the software do the rest. There is no cheap 4 axis software out there.

TurboCNC will run 4 motors but you need the software to convert the 3D drawing to GCode that will run the 4 motors. My forth axis was designed to be cheap simple and easy to build. To run run it you need to write the GCode using a text editor or Edit a existing GCode.

Cutting out the Lures as two halfs is the way to go. Putting a hop and skip in the cut will keep the part in place while it is being cut. This leaves tabs on the part. The part is than cut free with a razor knife.

For more info on building a simple CNC machine read this thread

http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=62920&page=1&pp=1

For more info relating to Lure cutting ask right here!

Thanks for the plug

John

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An estimate of the cost of the plan? Most plans are $36 Most machines can be built for under $150 not counting motors or controllers and software.

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Hummm . Ever heard of a cnc milling machine called Inca ? And if yes how are they ? I have seen it but its my friends and I finally got him to sell it to me . All I know its 7 1/2 feet tall , 5 or so feet wide and 900 pounds , any one in VA area want to help move this ?

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Oh . He doesnt have the cnc controls i need I have to but those when I get the milling machine , I saw in the catalog the controls alone are like 5,000 and up . I didnt notice if they came with software , any recomand ations ? I want good soft ware for 3d or I guess 4th axis . I am taking CNC at college this summer before I try to "figure" the thing out myself .

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Funny,

Stay clear of an older CNC machine. Just moving them can be big money. Start small and do lots of reading. Many people have a Bridgeport sitting in the garage or cellar waiting for someday! CNC is much harder

than learning computers.

John

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Hey FF if you want to try out some software just download it from Limewire thats what I did, I was going to design some worms and get Bob to make them for me on his CNC, I got way ahead of myself its too hard for me without help. You should just download some some different software and see which one you like best then buy a legal copy of it.

Tm

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Whats your opinion on a homebrewed cnc lathe setup for our (luremakers) application?

Seems to me that a CNC lathe type of device would be more appropriate for 360 machining.

Of course the spindle rotation would have to be a low RPM to let the (powered) cutting tool to do the work.

Do you know if cnc lathe software would allow for asymmetrical cuts?

(likely not huh)

Thanks for sharing

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Start small ? I have been asking around to a few machinist I have meet and asked about the table top CNCs that are like 3-5,000 dollars . They all said once I got good or used to them and started heavier projects and more production these would be useless as they are only for the "hobbiest" and would be pressed trying to run all day 5 days a week . I dont know , this is what I have heard . What do you think of these ? I need one that will last and relize it will cost . The smaller ones look cool but they only did up to like 12 inches or so , I need at least 24 inches . Would the small ones cut out plastic lure bodies quickly ? any help would be great as I am about to "dump" 20,000 in machinery .

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Start small and cheap. See if CNC is for you. Having an expensive machine that you don't know how to operate is very common You could start off by downloading the FREE version of TurboCAD and see if you can draw what you want in CAD. Just drawing an outline of a fish in CAD is hard. There are ways to draw and scan and then put the drawing Corel clean it up and then save as a DXF. Most people run out and buy expensive motor systems. That is backwards. You should decide what you want to do with the machine and then build from the cutter out. A Taig or Sherline would do about six lures at a time. I would design the lure in two halfs. You will find 3D drawing programs expensive and hard to use. The time required to learn CAD and do CNC programming could be used to make tons of lures.

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What do you think of Smithy Machines? I've been looking at one for a while but don't know anyone who has one. It could help out with one of my other hobbies as well...

I'm looking at the Smithy Midas 1220LTD but it's not CNC, could I adapt this machine to CNC with your plans?

The particular machine I'm looking at can be seen

[url=http://smithy.com/midas1220ltd.htmHERE

Thanks

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I have to agree with John Kleinbauer about getting started with CNC's.

I would recommend getting a packaged deal, even if it were a bench top machine like MaxNC. Use it as your trainer and for prototyping. When you are ready for production - then spend the big bucks on a machine that can handle the abuse.

This way, you will have two machines running - one for production and one for prototyping, R&D, or another small operation in your process (like cutting a lip slot or eye socket).

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I finally have almost finished my home built converted cnc mill, it is a small machine which I bought and converted to a cnc machine using Xylotex drivers and stepper motors. It wasn't too bad of a conversion and I plan on building a cnc router from scratch next and it will be a larger footprint machine capable of doing more than what I currently have. There are many cnc forums to help any of you guys build your own machine if you would like any info I would be glad to help out. The 4 axis software I believe you can run Mach2 if I'm not mistaken it can run 6 axis.

Nathan

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Fireball,

if you don't mind how much do you have invested I have been looking in to makeing one but I am a little overwhelmed by the computer part of it I pretty shure I can convert the machine I am looking at one from harbor frieght (280.00) and I think i found a place for the servos and other machanical parts (270.00) but the software is confussing to me i don't want to make something and not be able to use it any help would be great

thanks

dave

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I have invested about $1,600 total in my project machine total including software Bobcad v17, this doesn't include trial and error parts and other materials I have purchased which I could not use. It takes alot of patience building one of these machines and I had no prior experience in anything like this before. I purchased the same mill you are talking about and have converted it to cnc using a kit from kdn tools. I can give you all the info and specs on the stuff that will work with this mill if you would like them. I need to still do a few things limit and home switches and purchase a few more tools for my project but I am happy with it so far and you can do alot more than make fishing lures with it. I have been doing some engraving with it for some friends who own different shops, as my first cnc projects starting out small to figure this machining process out but I must say it's a very interesting hobby. I still have alot to learn and have made some mistakes and would be glad to help anyone who is thinking about getting into this type of project.

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Thanks for the info the servo's i am looking at are at hobbycnc.com i was looking at the 200 oz. 3 steppers but not shure if it will be enough or work,I also figure on using on a variaty of projects other than fishing stuff. sounds like the most expensive thing is software , I'm not worried about spending the money but how easy is it to use the software.

Thanks for the info

if you have the specs handy you can email me at slamminbaits@yahoo.com

thanks

dave

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Once you have the machine setup and operating properly which takes time and some trial and error. The software is the biggest learning curve to the whole project I would recommend taking a class at a local community college on the CAD part which would help out greatly. The software that runs the machine isn't as bad as I first thought it does take time to setup and get properly adjusted and working correctly but comes with pretty good instructions that can be dowloaded and reviewed. The servo's you are talking about 200 oz in. probably will work good not sure if you're going direct drive or with a pulley configuration? I have ordered 258 oz in. steppers for mine and at the moment I am running some 116 oz in. steppers that came with my controls using direct drive method I can't run high feed rates and it doesn't have enough holding torque for large cuts.

Nathan

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Fireball,

With the benchtop mill are you also controlling the Z-axis. If so how much travel are you getting? I just got a micro-mark mill and am playing with the idea of converting it. I haven't even had a chance to take it out of the crate, just moved to a new house, so I don't have a good idea of how much travel the Z-axis fine adjustment will allow. Also, did you need a lathe to perform the conversion? I have a machining and CAD background so programming and using the mill is familiar to me, it is the controller that will give me problems. Who do you think has the best info on what you need for a controller and how to hook it up? Thanks.

Spike

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