DIABLITO1377

Best Way To Keep Plastic Warm

23 posts in this topic

Hello everyone,

 

  Very new to this site and new to pouring plastic. I'm trying to reduce the amount of re heat in the micro wave. I pour out of Anchor cups. is there any way to have these on idle on any kind of heat source. Like a electric skillet or hot plate?  Any tips on this process will be appreciated.

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Presto pot from walmart $28 I just let the injector sit in it along with the plastic and keep the plastic stirred eveytime I shoot. Now problems at all. Good luck.

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I use small cast iron pots on a hotplate. Once the cast iron pots get hot...they can really hold the heat and help even out the hot spots from the hotplate. The are easy to clean by peeling the plastic out of when they cool. There are a bunch of posts on this on the Caney Creek forum site.

 

I found two smaller versions of this (I think they were for melting butter/fondue)

 

http://www.amazon.com/Lodge-LMP3-Pre-Seasoned-Cast-Iron-14-Ounce/dp/B0002CX9FE/ref=pd_sim_k_3

 

Another idea I've seen is to buy a high sided electric skillet (or get one at a second hand shop) and fill it with sand to help hold the heat and minimize hot spots. You can find more info on this on the Caney Creek website and/or send a PM to CTom.

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   Best way I found was with presto pot with stir system. You can buy from Bear at Bearsbaits or you can make your own, but I would suggest getting his stir system. My opinion, pot has to have a stir system to assure you never forget to stir and burn your plastic, also goes thru phases much better.

 

  Here is a pic of mine:   www.bearsbaitsforum.com/index.php?topic=5608.0

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Presto pot from walmart $28 I just let the injector sit in it along with the plastic and keep the plastic stirred eveytime I shoot. Now problems at all. Good luck.

Hey Dawg, I know I asked you the preparation behind the presto pot..I know I'm dense but I'm trying hard to wrap my head around it..so once you set the pot for the temp you want ( I assume theres a dial in for temp?) you just stir every so often...do you take plastic into the injector and evacuate also to heat up the inside of the injector or just sitting in the pot does it all??? Also...how long does it take to heat the plastic between 320 and 350?? Edited by Southern Yankee

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if your injectors are sitting in the presto it will be hot enough..

 

now back to the original post..

 

1377,

 

are you hand pouring or injecting ?

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That was kind of rude Bas-Boys..the original question was answered so to speak and I was asking a question  on the elaboration of his answer..Although I appreciate the answer you gave it was addressed to Dawg.. Didn't know I was getting under anyones skin for asking..It wont happen again

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no no ,, your not under my skin at all buddy.. ask away..

i guess I should have worded it better

 

just was saying that I am answering 2 questions in 1 post..

and wanted to seperate the 2,

 

as I read the original post ,,I would say that he is NOT  injecting and is hand pouring..by the way its worded..

so I thought it mite not have been answered..

 

but there ya go about the posting and not face to face ,, ya gota take it as ya read it ..

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all is good buddy !!!

thanks !

 

I still do not know if he is pouring or injecting ?

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Ahhhh ........ Bro mance in the spring time

Now that's some funny stuff right there...

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S. Yankee:

 

( I assume theres a dial in for temp?) 

 

Close up of Presto pot thermostat control. 

Some units are closer to selected temp than others, but people that use them (for the most part) say they're reasonably close.  Not like you're gonna select 300 on the dial and get 400 degrees...

616577047_tp.jpg

 

Time it takes to heat is going to vary according to the quantity you put in to begin with.  I believe most heat in a microwave and transfer to the presto pot to make it quicker.

 

Rick

SE CT

Edited by rixon529
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Hello everyone,

 

  Very new to this site and new to pouring plastic. I'm trying to reduce the amount of re heat in the micro wave. I pour out of Anchor cups. is there any way to have these on idle on any kind of heat source. Like a electric skillet or hot plate?  Any tips on this process will be appreciated.

 

Diablito -

If you haven't already seen it, take a look at Frank's video - http://www.tackleunderground.com/community/index.php?/topic/22143-open-pour-video-vein-pouring/

 

You'll notice that he keeps his heated plastic in Pyrex cups on an electric skillet.  You can get one of these at most stores that carry small appliances.  They're made by Presto, GE, Rival, etc in a variety of sizes from 6"x6" and up.  Prices will vary as well starting about $20.  The key is to get one that will accomodate the number and size of cups you will normally want to keep warmed.  Remember that you're paying for the electricity to heat the element in the skillet, so if you get a 12"x18" and only keep one 8 ounce cup in it, you're wasting an awful lot of heat and the electricity used to produce it...  Then again, if you're only pouring once a month or less, it may not matter to you.

 

Although I've never used one, I'm inclined to believe the hot plate method (although I know some use them) would require much more of a learning curve to maintain the proper heat adjustment.  Most of these units are controlled by a knob with the "1 / 2 / 3", or "LO / MED / HI" guage as opposed to the skillet which usually has a dial incremented in degrees.

 

Your choice will be determined by whatever you find comfortable.

 

Rick

SE CT

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Quick question for the Presto users....

 

  Do you find you need to mess with the temp on the Presto pot as the amount of plastic you have left is reduced after each pour/injection?  Say you start with 2 cups of plastic - it's heated to 300-325 -  as you use it up and reach 1 cup or less in the pot need to dial the heat up or down to keep the plastic the correct temp?

 

  I had been using a cheap hot plate and cast iron pot and would have to continually reduce the thermostat as I used the plastic to keep it from scorching.... I'm now back to nuking in silicone measuring cups to keeps things under control easier as my molds ar DIY and take considerable time to demold compared to an aluminum mold... with the cheap hot plate I would end up scorching plastic.  I've been tempeted to buy a presto but I usually do not cook more than 8-16oz at one time, so it may be overkill if it's not real easy to use and eliminate messing with adjusting temp or nuking in short bursts.

 

  Thanks,

 

       J.

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It does take a little bit longer to heat up but well worth it .... I have been doing 2 cups plus with making anywhere from 50-100+ baits with absolutely no color change. I am so glad I bought the presto pot and have rigged my own stirring system. That is also a must ......just my own opinion

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Slow fish ---  the Presto has a thermostat that keeps it fairly close.

You can do a cup & a half OK  ...  Need with Stirring System,

Hope that helps

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Since my last post I have purchased the Presto..I am not yet pouring/injecting plastic though as I am tending to other needs around the home, but...I certainly appreciate all the input fellows..Thanx a bunch !!! :)

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Kajan,

 

  Awesome metal fabbing.... really nice.  Quick question on your stirring mechanism..... how many RPM's do you run and what torque does your motor need/provide to stir a pot?  Looking at your prop/paddle - I'd assume you have a decent motor in there to turn a fairly filled pot of plastic which I'd imagine needs some strength.

 

  Been looking at different things and trying to figure out if it's worth the time and cash to make my own setup.... Presto is a no-brainer as it's 30 bucks and I have a bunch of brass fittings for other things I can use... but the stirring is the one I want think about and figure out.

 

   J.

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