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Joe

Router Bits

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This is for the guys using routers to shape baits, it may be old news for some of you, Received a catalog a few days ago from MLCS Woodworking. www.mlcswoodworking.com They offer two types and several sizes of full radius router bits that would shape both sides of a baits back and belly with just one pass through the router. Again, keep in mind all the safety recomendations mentioned in earlier post as far as using a router for baits. Joe

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Joe,

Do you know which bits those were? That way i don't have to browse through all of their products.

Thanks,

JP

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Bit # 5461 3/8" dia. Carbide height 13/16" shank size 1/4" Bit #5462 1/2" dia. Carbide height 15/16" Shank size 1/4" Price $16.00 each with free shipping. Joe Page 19 in the catalog.

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Hey as long as we are talking about routers, can someone tell me how to keep the damn bit from biting the edge of the bait when I first get started? I have tried bringing the bait in slow, fast, at an angle and all work part of the time but every once in awhile, wham, nails the edge and makes for some extra repair...doggonnnnit!

Jed

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Start your cut in the middle of the back and in the middle of the lowest part of the belly. You will have to go backwards on half of the cuts on both sides. The bit kicking can still happen, but you will reduce the chances by doing it this way.

Skeeter

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Part of it also has to do with the type of grain you are cutting into. Examine the wood and if you see irregular grain or a change in direction of the grain, chances are you might get some tear out.

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Hey Skeeter,

I gave your recommendation a try the last couple of days and it works perfectly, wish I had asked sooner.

Thx.

Jed

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Jed,

You're welcome. Don't feel bad, it is a natural thing to start at the beginning of the cut. Took me awhile to figure it out.

Skeeter

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You can also push your stock backwards when dealing with edge grain. Edge grain is notorious for tearing out.

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