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Vandy

Lifespan Of Wooden Lures

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That's a hard question to answer Vandy as there are so many variables. Such things as how often the bait is fished, is it continually banged into hard cover such as rocks, how many fish it's caught and their size, is it slapped on the water to remove weeds, etc. And that's not taking into account as to how the lure was built or what materials it was built from. I've got some lures I've been fishing for 3 or more years that show very few signs of wear. And there are 1 or 2 that only made it a couple fishing trips before they needed the top coat repaired. And it also makes a difference as to what type of fish your going after. A musky is going to do a lot more damage to a bait than a bass is.

 

I fish mainly for largemouth bass and the best answer I can give you is that a well built wooden lure, properly built and taken care of, can last for many years. Take the same lure and fish for musky and it may last one season or less.

 

It would help to answer your question if you gave more details of what you fish for, how often you fish, etc.

 

Ben

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I fish for bass and the lures I have been using are made from basswood. Right now my crank baits are only lasting a couple days of heavy use. The lures are sealed well so the the actual wood is not being damaged. I just started using Solarez so I'm sure there will be some learning curve. I have been dipping with Solarez and it leaves a fairly thick coat. Do you think brushing on a couple of coats would be a better way to go?

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If I get a chip in the topcoat the water is getting underneath the top layer and it starts cracking and coming off. I have been sealing the lures with Solarez, priming with a spray can of primer, and then painting with craft store acryllic paint. I then dip the baits in Solarez, let them hang for about 10 minutes and cure them in the sun. I let them cure for at least an hour rotating them every few minutes.

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If water gets under the clear coat then it's going to fail.   I do not know of a product or process that will prevent that from happening.  

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Vandy, I've had a couple recent issues with Solarez.  I agree, they can't take the beating.  If I am grinding rocks all day, the coat will eventually fail.  The ease of use and price point is fantastic (and still worth using for that reason), but I find it lacking (too brittle) when compared to epoxy or DN coatings.  

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Resiliency is the main reason I stick with the ACC... If it gets dinged it seems to have a self healing quality about it. Not that it's bulletproof or that it will sustain gouges but I have smacked a few of my ACC coated lures against riprap rocks (hard enough to dent the lure) and still maintained surface integrity...

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This very issue is what's got me thinking twice about using Solarez as a top coat. I haven't fished any of the lures I've coated with it yet, but will definitely be keeping an eye on them when I do.

 

Ben

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Over the course of 3 years, I had a lure that was all beaten up, it had caught so many muskies.  I decided to strip it down and rebuild it again........it never caught fish after that.  Now I just retire them.

 

s56

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I have a few baits that I still fish that are over 10yrs old.

Me too , ........covered with pike bite marks and hook rashes and white primer shining through but still cast them every summer , ...had been lucky with this bunch of linseedoil-treated abachewood lures , I guess ?

 

But over here in Germany we do not catch as many fish compared to other countries , I guess .

 

                                                   cheers , diemai :yay:

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Some countries promote catch and release that with time allows fisheries to flourish.........and then you have some countries that force you to harvest the fish because catch and release is considered inhumane and therefore banned resulting in less fish.......


Mmmm, maybe that's why certain lures don't last as long as others?  The skill required to catch more fish may not be a factor either, eh diemai?


 

s56
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Yeah its been only the topcoat that has been failing so I have been able to repaint and coat the baits. I'm going to try a few thin coats and see if the results are any better. Sealing the baits with Solarez has prevented any noticeable damage to the wood so maybe I will use it just for sealing.

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Some countries promote catch and release that with time allows fisheries to flourish.........and then you have some countries that force you to harvest the fish because catch and release is considered inhumane and therefore banned resulting in less fish.......

Mmmm, maybe that's why certain lures don't last as long as others?  The skill required to catch more fish may not be a factor either, eh diemai?

 

s56

Exactly the case over here in Germany , .,,,.strictly following the fishing restrictions C & R is illegal , .....if everybody would obey , we'd be left without any sufficient fish stocks entirely .

 

Why do you think , that our few lurefishing pro's are most likely doing their videos and magazine picture essays in neighbour countries like f. e. the Netherlands(strictly C & R for pike) , ...they often won't say it straight , but if one looks closely , one would find out easily .

 

This is why , compared to other countries , fishing in Germany is probably not suitable for a realistic comparison about the lifespan of a timber lure , ........they'd simply last longer over here , I guess :blink:  :lol: !

 

Talking about skills , ........I guess , it's rather more about being content enough :lol: !

 

                                             Cheers , Dieter :yay:

Edited by diemai

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Why not switch to a better clear coat that will last?   I've using Flex Coat's Ultra V high build rod finish for several yrs with no complaints.   Yes it's a brush on clear that requires a drying wheel but no need to repaint/repair baits after a fishing trip.

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Vandy,  I think your trouble is "priming with a spray can of primer".   I'm new here but my first two wood baits were MS Slammer type baits and I sealed with wood primer.  It didn't take long for water to get in and start cracking the paint.  I think if you seal the raw wood bait with penetrating epoxy or even with the Solarez, then paint, then seal with Solarez it will be pretty tough and last much longer.  Be sure to use catalyst with the solarez for the prime coat and get it in the lip slot and screw holes.  Solarez in the screw holes if you have them will not cure without catalyst because it will not get any of the uv.

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I don't believe that it's your topcoat. IMHO, I think that it's the wood that you are using. Basswood has a high absorbency rate as I showed in a post here at TU a couple of years ago. No matter what you use to seal with or how good you think you've sealed your lure, it will still absorb water. I changed to Paulownia and have had no problems since. 

 

Gene

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First three months of the Cabinet and Furniture technology course at Palomar college was on wood movement. There is no finish that will keep it from expanding and contracting. Wood moves with the humidity alone. Here in Iowa drawers stick in the summer and slide out like a greased pig in the winter. This is all finished wood furniture and indoors. Get a moisture meter for wood and you will see it  displayed on the screen. Each species of wood expands and contracts a at a different rate. A quote from the link at the bottom of this post. It explains it pretty well.

 

"Even fully dried wood will grow and shrink in size a little with seasonal changes in relative humidity of the air. Changes in ambient humidity are all it takes, the wood doesn't actually need to get wet. A layer of varnish can slow down how fast humidity gets in and out of the wood, but all varnishes, even oil based ones, allow moisture to migrate in and out slowly. Even plastics are slightly moisture permeable. That's why potato chip bags are always shiny on the inside - they have a thin coating of aluminium to lock out moisture."

 

 

http://woodgears.ca/wood_grain/shrinkage.html

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First three months of the Cabinet and Furniture technology course at Palomar college was on wood movement. There is no finish that will keep it from expanding and contracting. Wood moves with the humidity alone. Here in Iowa drawers stick in the summer and slide out like a greased pig in the winter. This is all finished wood furniture and indoors. Get a moisture meter for wood and you will see it  displayed on the screen. Each species of wood expands and contracts a at a different rate. A quote from the link at the bottom of this post. It explains it pretty well.

 

"Even fully dried wood will grow and shrink in size a little with seasonal changes in relative humidity of the air. Changes in ambient humidity are all it takes, the wood doesn't actually need to get wet. A layer of varnish can slow down how fast humidity gets in and out of the wood, but all varnishes, even oil based ones, allow moisture to migrate in and out slowly. Even plastics are slightly moisture permeable. That's why potato chip bags are always shiny on the inside - they have a thin coating of aluminium to lock out moisture."

 

 

http://woodgears.ca/wood_grain/shrinkage.html

I'm intrigued, both by the fact that varnished wood still allows moisture in and by the possibility that I've been eating aluminum coated chips.   :popcorn:

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