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YosemiteSam

"Clearcoating" means...______________?____________

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I'm totally new. Haven't done more than whittle down and sand a few topwater pieces of wood, so bear with me.

When you guys refer to CLEARCOATING with Devcon 2 ton Epoxy.....does it mean:

A. Coating a freshly sanded wood lure so it can be painted?

or

B. Coating a final coat of dried paint (Createx or whatever)

I'm trying to clear up any differences in wood sealing, and etc etc. Thanks!

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[b]Clearcoating[/b] .[i]verb[/i] [i][kleerkoting][/i]...
The final transparent coat added onto a rigid lure. :wink:

You can use many products ranging from clear polyurethane, enamels, lacquers or acrylics.

some that come to mind are:
Spar urethane
water based clear polyurethane
Clear acrylic spray aerosol
clear spray lacquer aerosol
Clear vinyl powder paint
Flex-coat epoxy
Envirotex epoxy (bar top finish)
DevCon 2ton epoxy

I recommend any of the last 3 they are the toughest & least likely to react with your paint jobs.
The clearcoat is meant to protect & seal your paint job and lure from abrasion & give a glassy finish.

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A quick crash course for making a topwater wooden lure would go something like:

1 Carve the bait
2 Weight & fill the bait
3 Sand the bait
4 Seal the bait (sanding sealer etc.)
5 Prime the bait (usually white)
6 Paint the bait
7 Clearcoat the bait
8 Add hardware (line ties, hooks etc.)

people usually add the hardware whenever its convienent for them.
do what works for you.

hope that helps.

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Thanks Musky & RedGator. It doesn't get any clearer than that.

So, I'll have about 6 sticks my Tuesday, all ready for sealing.

I've read what you guys post all over the forum and I've learned a lot already from the old posts. Thanks. I'm having a great time prepping this wood.

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Having a good time is what its all about, if you enjoy your work your work will improve I promise.

Its fun crafting your baits, but wait until one produces a nice fish for you. You'll be grinnin ear-to-ear :D

enjoy.

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It does get clearer than that.....always use Envirotex.... that is as clear as it gets! Aint that right Richoh and Chip...???

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TBait

If I didn't know better, I'd suspect you were a strong advocate of Envirotex! (((grin)))

But bear with me now, I'm new, and it's been a long haul to sort this all out. So, to start, I'll be coating with either the Marine Spar Varnish or Polyurethane that I've got at home already.

My first painting will be limited to some spray paints and maybe some colored Nail Polish that I've had around from fly tying. One other good thing is that I do have a Paasche air brush, but I've never used it, so I'll get around to getting some Createx Acrylics in a month or so.

I'm not too advanced in woodworking tools. Mostly, I'm carving wood plugs with my comfortable Kershaw pocket knive, going over rough edges with Stanley SurForm and Rasp, 60 grit sandpaper, etc (These are 7 1/2" copies of musky/pike topwater lures). I've got a Dremel tool to cheat with, and a drill for through-wiring, and I'm waiting for more supplies to arrive each day.

These first plugs are Ponderosa Pine. The 1" Red Oak dowels I started on last night (4 3/4" long) are turning out to be very difficult to carve, so I'm going to try some Beech or Birch in hope of getting a hardbait that will SUSPEND or SINK no more than a couple feet. [Any suggestions on this?] Thanks all.

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Try the varnish, but please do not try the poly.
This will not stand up to teeth or time very well.

Birch will do you no good, very soft.

Maple ( rock hard tough to work with harderd than oak)will get you what your looking for with sink or suspend but you will need to weight any of the woods, be it larger screws or hooks it will be a balancing act.

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Thanks Richoc:

I may have spend a little too much money on my woods too. The 8' piece of 5/4 BIRCH I bought today from a high quality hardwood lumberyard cost me about $37.00 I'm thinking there must be lumberyards with a lower grade of lumber for making lures?

I'll look for some Maple. You guys are good help.

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Sam,
Check your area for any cabinet making shops. You should be able to find some suitable hardwood scraps there and they will probably give you all you want for nothing.

Gene

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I have some rock hard maple here.
Very , very, did I say very hard wood.
Prefect for turning muskie plugs if you are interested in trying it PM me.
They are 14"x2"x2"
Can be cut for smaller plugs also.
Muskie plugs are what I do with them.

That price for birch wow.
I burn birch to start fires up north.
The bark burns like it is soaked in gas.

Scraps are the way to go.
One mans trash is another mans treasure.

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Rich, Thanks for offering the hard rock maple. By the way, when the term "hard rock maple" is used, does that mean a certain maple tree? I don't even know if there's more than one maple. [But then, I couldn't even spell my middle name til the 5th grade :roll: ]

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I have been trying to figure that out my self.......

There are a bunch of different types of maple.

Just on My block alone there is 2 diff, kinds.

Red, Sugar, and Maple are the ones I know.

But there are many types of wood that is maple, birdseye, hard rock, etc.

Just to make it hard to figure out what is what.

Birds eye is very rare and very cool.

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Richoc,

Well, mind you, when I get some hard rock maple, I figure the only way I can do this justice is to take it to the professional woodworking shop to cut it down to workable size. Ya gotta respect wood like that.

The most common tree here is the Chinese Elm. It's an odd tree. It grows big, but can also grow like a weed too. There's lots of little ones from 3/4" to 2" in diameter. I'm going to dry some of that and try it too. I guess carving wood is about the neatest thing since the invention of the Executive Torlet . :D

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Cuting those type of weeds down all the time here.
Working on a 75 footer over powerlines right now.
Forget using it , they are good for 2 things, making a hell of a mess in the yard.
And getting fires going as they burn if hot enuff when still wet.
Mine really like to get hollow and fall in the wind storms we keep getting up here.
Bad thing is now I have no shade on the house, yu can really notice.
Used to be totally shaded buy 2 of them, one was 120ft but split down middle and had to go.
Have cut and taken out the stumps of 114 of those buggers, about 5 to do yet this year.
Never had air conditioner till we cut the one down, really notice the heat from the sun now.
High here was 68, 85 on the second floor when I got in.
Oh yea the stumps just keep growing if you do pull them out.
Heck with all the rain we have been having, the branches started growing on the trailer.

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