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Ok so I did my homework and searched the forum fairly well I really didn't find a thread about painting with a paint brush... Since I just tried my hand at it and found it allot tougher then I thought it was going to be I am asking who paints there baits with a paint brush? What kind of paint and brushes do you use? I know there are a few people here that do and there has got to be some tips of good ideas or bad ideas for using paint brushes. 

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I've tried the same searches. The only brush painters I came up with are Diemai, Littleriver and Mark Poulson (if you count nail polish). I tried hand brushing of Creativ this am and so far it's ok. I hate messing with an airbrush.

 

bill

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Who springs to mind to me re paintbrush lures is member littleriver.  I have a couple of his lures.  He uses a sort of an impressionistic method to paint a lure and it's very attractive, though it must be a lot of work.

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Yeah I figured before I paint anymore of the bodies I've just made by hand I should practice a bit... I took a piece of heavy artist paper and traced out different lure body styles on it and have started painting them... I am just using general acrylic paint from the craft shop since we already had a ton of it and most of it is for outdoor use... but he have all the primary colors so you can mix them to get just about anything seems to be working out ok I'm gonna glue some tin foil on a sheet later and repeat the shapes on that and see what happens there... the silver paint turn out ok but still looks a little cheesy... 

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@ Griffond

 

Painting straight on foil won't adhere well or might not even provide sufficient paint coverage !

 

Foiled lures do require one or two epoxy coats straight on the foil as a primer , ...also these epoxy coats even out any small wrinkles or uncovered spots(of foil) at back or belly of the lure blank .

 

Greetz , Dieter :yay:

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Hi Griffond I painted a trout parr using foam for dabbing and homemade templates. I then used the brush to create splatter techniques I used auto air paint  maybe this is cheating but I still used the brush :)  

cheers crankie

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You beat me to it Bill. I was going to say John Hopkins baits are really outstanding. I thought he used an airbrush before buying his dvd and seeing how he paints them with a brush.

 

Ben

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Ben,

What's your opinion of the DVD? His shipping is a little excessive but where else can you find that type of info. I searched youtube and google with little results. Actually the old decorative bird carving videos I used to have would have been of use but the player died long ago.

 

I emailed him and he said it was actually faster for him to use a brush so he wasn't constantly cleaning an air brush.

 

bill

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Hello Griffond

 

Painting with a brush seems a daunting task at first but little by little it gets a bit easier as your confidence grows. I have only been at it a couple years now on and off. I think it is a skilled acquired through practice. Though some knowledgeable instruction would be great. Yet little can be found.  I am still a novice when I look at Dieter's and Hopkin's work. They both have thier own unique style and that is one of the things I really like about painting this way. I know a Dieter bait when I see it. Same with Hopkins. if you keep at it, you too will develop your own style. I want to share with you one of the first baits I ever painted with a brush

 

P5174401.JPG

 

Does that paint scheme look familiar? Blue back rattletraps have caught me many fish over the years and that was what I was after with this top water bait. Your on the right path. Patience, practice and time will take care of the rest. Like you; I made the same mistakes . Dieter is a fantastic teacher and his suggestion of epoxing the bait before painting and after foil is spot on. every wrinkle in the foil is visable if you skip this step. 

 

My introduction to this style was through Dieter's work. Later I was introduced to the work by Hans Nordin. Again, I have to thank Dieter :worship:  :worship:  :worship: . With his help, I have a German copy of Han's book "Wobbler". Though in German, I have been able to translate a great deal. One of the topics he covers is brush painting. All of Han's baits are brush painted and he has been doing it for years. Here is a link with more about Hans . Though the page is in Swedish it may be translated if your using a google chrome browser. Hans is still taking folks on fishing trips and giving seminars to this day on how to build your own baits. His baits are very much in demand. 

 

http://www.outdoor.se/nordin/wobbler.htm

 

Now you want to know what brush to use. I prefer small water color brushes. That is what Han's suggests one use in his book and that is exactly what I have been using ever since. Sometimes more successfully than others.  :( If you have more specific questions please don't hesitate to ask . 

 

Vic

 

 

 

P5174401.JPG

P5174401.JPG

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P5174401.JPG

P5174401.JPG

P5174401.JPG

P5174401.JPG

post-26144-0-65118200-1379550118_thumb.jpg

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Personally I think Johns DVD is well worth the money in many different ways and it covers much more than just painting. If you ever plan on building a swimbait it is invaluable. I've always enjoyed watching true craftsmen work no matter their skill set and just on that level the DVD was worth it to me. Ultimately it is your decision as I don't know what path your wanting to take as far as building lures or how far down that path your wanting to go. As far me, I've never thought twice about it being worth what I paid for it.

 

Ben

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Personally I think Johns DVD is well worth the money in many different ways and it covers much more than just painting. If you ever plan on building a swimbait it is invaluable. I've always enjoyed watching true craftsmen work no matter their skill set and just on that level the DVD was worth it to me. Ultimately it is your decision as I don't know what path your wanting to take as far as building lures or how far down that path your wanting to go. As far me, I've never thought twice about it being worth what I paid for it.

 

Ben

 

Looking at Hopkins work it is obvious it is money well spent. I just wish my wife felt the same way.  :cry: I have wanted it ever since I knew about it.  :D Still waiting for the right moment unfortunately. Baby steps........I still have a long ways to go........

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You may also enjoy this Polish blog.

 

http://1939handmadelure.blogspot.com/2012_06_01_archive.html

 

The first two months of it are brush and sponge painting. Third month he has a picture of an airbrush so I assumed he was using that afterward. I keep taking different things away from all these sites. The Polish blog showed me how different dilutions of color can produce varied spots. See some of the trout lures. Also showed me how a spot with very diluted color where the color dries to the outside can be a good thing. I always thought of it in terms of being a negative.

 

bill

Edited by scrubs

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@ scrubs

 

Thanks for sharing , ......some very nice work to be seen there , ....another proof for what Vic had mentioned above , ......every handbrush painter leaves his own signature on the lure , hardly two guys do have the same pass of the brush , ..not to talk of  using different types of paint and/or employing different painting techniques .

 

Greetz , Dieter :yay:

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It's funny but I'm having more problem with a paint brush than I used to with an airbrush. Keep trying to go realistic when I want impressionistic. I did a lot of decoy and decorative bird carving years back. That was almost all realistic except for a few "slick" style decoys. All Acrylics over gesso which was suited to blending washes of color. The first lures I've done are unpainted plastics with a primer of satin Krylon Fusion. Tougher to do washes without runs. I suppose I should try a coat of Createx primer airbrushed.

 

bill

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Yeah I have been painting on acrylic paper for a few days now I've done about 4 sheets with trace outs of lures trying to find out what I can do with the brushes and paints I have and I'm getting better just not what I want yet... still holding off on painting lures until I get a little better... I did use some spray can primer(white) on paper since that is probably what I would prime the lures with...seems to work pretty good. 

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Littleriver,

Good deal, thanks for letting me know. I'll try it on the wood baits I've turned. The plastic stuff is intended for practice painting, maybe I can get a similar base with matte spray white. If not I'll try Krylon Crystal Clear matte over the Krylon white.

 

bill

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Sorry can't be much help with plastic but sounds like your figuring it out. 

 

here is what i am using on wood     

 

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Daler-Rowney-Simply-Acrylic-Gesso-16-oz/17753276

 

Several thin coats I find works best. Dries quick in a hot car or with heat, so several coat can be accomplished in relatively small amount of time. 

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One word of caution about using rattle can primers. Or any mismatched components as far as that goes. You need to think of painting lures as a system of individual products brought together to perform a task. From base to top coat they all have to be compatible with each other to avoid disasters. It sucks to see a paint job you've worked on for an hour or more turn into a bunch of wrinkles in just a few seconds as you apply your top coat. Don't ask me how I know. :mad: You can run into problems mixing and matching sealers, paint, top coats, etc. Sometimes the solvents in one product don't play nice with the solvents in something else and this can lead to problems. I say this because most of the rattle can primers, paints and clear coats that I'm aware of have solvents in them. Now they usually have no problem with acrylic paints, but can react with a top coat that uses a different solvent. Now if your using an epoxy you shouldn't have any trouble as epoxies are usually inert. You guys may be fully aware of this, but I just wanted to mention it again to hopefully save someone a lot of aggravation.

 

Ben

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yeah I have had that happen with paints just not on lures I know exactly what your talking about that is why I'll stick with D2T for a top coat for now I know it won't kill the paint 

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