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VanderLaan

Paint...

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Spent way too much time at Hobby Lobby today looking at paint. They sell createx in pearl, opaque and transparent. They also sell the ''hobby paint'' in the 2 oz bottles.

My confusion lies in what type of paint I need to buy for crankbaits and trolling plugs. Would I use the opaque as a base coat and then layer the details with transparent? Do you just apply the transparent more heavily to get the opaque finish? I suspect that you can use transparent to get opaque, but not vice versa.

My first project is to give a couple dozen j-plugs a fresh coat of paint. Given that they are trolling plugs with simple paint schemes, could I just thin the acrylic hobby paints? Would I be able to get the blended edge with the acrylic hobby paints?

Is there a situation where you would use pearl? What about metallics? Would love to use them on the j-plugs.

Thanks-

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5601 Transparent base is the medium you use to make opaque paint transparent and all of those types of paint in the Createx line are used in the course of painting a crank bait but you have the right understanding on how to go about it. Do a search on painting and get a handle on some of the finer points to layering paint it will help you understand their place.

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You're right that shooting a transparent airbrush paint heavier makes it opaque.  You can use cheap hobby paint with an airbrush if it has a big enough tip to pass the larger paint particles that hobby paint contains, and if you are willing to thin the paint down.  Some hobby paints have paint particles so large that even a large tip airbrush will clog.  You never know til you try one.  If you can get it to shoot, you can do pretty much anything with it you could do with airbrush paint.  A lot of us started painting that way - but most of us eventually come to our senses and use airbrush paint because it will clog much less often and is not such a hassle to thin and shoot.  Airbrush paint goes a long way when you are doing crankbaits, so in the general scheme of things it's inexpensive.

 

Live baitfish often have pearlescent and metallic hues, especially on their backs and shoulders, and those colors tend to make a lure more natural looking.  Most fish have white bellies.  Pearl white makes the white "pop".  Looks better?  You and the fish have to decide.

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I have also had good results using testors acrylic and standard model paint but I am still learning spax sticks also does a good job and the colors are great with little to no thinning but requires a good mask because the fumes will be strong even with good ventilation but it is costly I planned on doing some cranks tonight but I think I threw away abt 25 while cleaning up so I'm up late ordering more good luck

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When he says hobby paint I was thinking testors, model air, tamyia as far as craft paint yes you can spray it but as stated it is not refined like AB paint using an acrylic medium to thin it down and straining will help and will not affect the film properties associated with reducing with water but you will need a bigger needle/tip I use a .66 and I can spray craft glitter paint so it is doable just a lot more goes into prep and is not always guaranteed.

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I've read here of people straining their hobby paint with some kind of filter cloth (women's nylons?) to remove the pieces that are too big for an airbrush.

Can anyone tell me what they use?

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I use the hobby paints sometimes to get a diff. look but I thin them a lot before using it about 50/50 with most work well using homemade reducer(the recipes on here for those who want to try it)as for the transparent paints i use them a lot on foiled baits as it lets the foil show thru the paint getting it to reflex the light and shine it also brightens up the opaque colors and lets some of the details show thru.

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I've read here of people straining their hobby paint with some kind of filter cloth (women's nylons?) to remove the pieces that are too big for an airbrush.

Can anyone tell me what they use?

 

Yep, nylons. I've put a small pieces on the tops of the bottles and put the cap back on. It helps strain out the dried chunks.

 

Jerry

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Yep, nylons. I've put a small pieces on the tops of the bottles and put the cap back on. It helps strain out the dried chunks.

 

Jerry

 

Thanks.  I'll try that.

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