redg8r

Dupli-k8r 1000 [concept machine]

27 posts in this topic

Tool, Jig, machine whatever ya wanna call it.

This the latest development on a machine I designed a few years ago called the Dupli-k8r.

This machine is inspired from 2 tiny photos from:

http://www.thundershad.com/php/TSIndex.php?page=HowMade

I'm under the impression that the machine is of Lee Sissons design

& after talking with a fella that used to work with it said the cost was around 20,000..... while necessity is the mother of all invention, being broke will spark the creative juices also :wink:

The concept machine below is made from approximately half a sheet of 3/4" luan & various other easily obtainable parts

Now to cover my ass real quick

"WE" as in Tackleunderground.com, its owners, affiliates, & members assume no responsibility for errors or omissions in these materials.

THESE MATERIALS ARE PROVIDED "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER

EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF

MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR NON-INFRINGEMENT.

We do not warrant the accuracy or completeness of the

information, text, graphics,links or other items contained within these materials.

We shall not be liable for any special, indirect, incidental, physical or

consequential damages, including without limitation, lost revenues or lost profits, or lost limbs :wink:

which may result from the use of these materials. The information on this server is

subject to change without notice and does not represent a commitment on the part of

us in the future.

peek.jpg

I finally rushed thru a concept version of my duplik8r to test the basic design. If you understand the operation, you'll see its basically a glorified apple peeler & works in the same fasion. I was worried that the overall concept wouldnt work so I rushed thru a quick build to test it (due in part to the "pestering" provided by the community here :wink: )

I'm very pleased with the result. I was wondering if the angle grinder would take the side load force of cutting in a spiral & it did fine.

I was also worried about the RPM of the blank. I figured it would cut the blank while it rotated about 60 rpm, but i pushed it to 120rpm & it could've took more. With using a #20 allthread rod/drive that equals out to cutting a 4.5" bait in under a minute.

NOTE questions are welcomed, but please dont attempt to build this thing yet, I put it here for inspiration & to prove it could be done, yet its full of issues that mostly hindered the original duplik8r such as below:

PROS

Very rigid

Runs off of one single motor

Cuts faster than the original duplik8r

Relatively small in size @ 3'x1'x2'

No software (yet) John K? :idea:

Adjusts from 2" to 9" baits

Vaccum can be attached easily

more automation with added limit switches

CONS

Only does 1 bait at a time (have to replace fresh blank every cycle)

Original bait needs square ends (like a lathed blank)

Pain to change out blanks

Must manually reverse the motor to reset the cycle. (doubles production time)

Made from wood - (but its just a concept piece)

Restricted to max. 7/8 dia. baits (due to small cutting blade)

Slight wear on the original woodbait (can be fixed by casting sacrificial Duplicates with epoxy or poly-resin)

No safety measures (yet)

Basic parts used:

1) Var speed drill

1) bicycle chain & 3) rear deraileur sprockets (white one was cast from liquid plastic :wink: )

2) 1/4" allthread rod

10) 7/8 od - 5/16 id roller blade bearings

2) 12" ball bearing (accuride) drawer slides

4) 1.25" PVC caps

1) angle grinder with a 4" biscut joiner saw blade attached

2) hinges (for tracer & cutting arm)

HDPE (polyethelyne sheet) for various wear plates (seen white)

Right after I ran the first test an Idea smacked me in the head, so I'm gonna attempt to rebuild it to allow me to feed an 8 foot piece of stock into it instead of adding fresh blanks after every cycle.

Like I said, the basic concept works & works well. My main focus from here will be to adjust the design to allow better feeding of the wood to make it more automated. Adding switches & limits to the frame will make it safer, adding guards, vaccuum etc.

function.jpg

function.jpg

function.jpg

function.jpg

function.jpg

function.jpg

function.jpg

function.jpg

743_thumb.attach

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AWESOME! You beat me out of the gate, I got an idea from this site www.wood-carver.com/gemini.html and was working on a similiar feed mechanism to spiral cut using a "dummy" as a pattern. the only thing I know right now is mine will defeat the max. dia. limitation yours has. will still have to load one blank at a time, but will be able to cut all the way to the nose of the bait (still have to have one flat end). I'm gonna use a router for cutting power, but mostly cause I have an extra one. I think cnc might be do-able on my machine pretty easy, just don't know enough at this point. Anyway, check out that duplicator and see if it doesn't lite up the old "hair covered computer".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alright, I'm not alone in my psychotic duplicaing quest :D

keep us informed on yours, maybe we could integrate. I have a trim router that would fit the bill also (leftover from the original duplik8r)

Ive reserched that site you posted many times, its a pretty good setup.

the only drawback is that it only does 1 side at a time. I think they make another model that allows you to "turn" the piece but its done manually.

Heres another one:

http://www.copycarver.com

Below is a previous builders duplik8r made from the old plans.

hoosiermachine.gif

hoosiermachine.gif

hoosiermachine.gif

hoosiermachine.gif

hoosiermachine.gif

hoosiermachine.gif

hoosiermachine.gif

hoosiermachine.gif

745_thumb.attach

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is really great !!! Red, I really want to thank you for putting a rush on this for us. I am really interested in this whole thing. My dad ordered the original plans for the old machine, but he lost them and I never got to see them. I am really going to do some study on this concept. However, I am really mentally challanged when it comes to this type of thing. I just don't have the insight you guys have. Guess it's time to start. Thanks again.

Skeeter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jerry , Thanks for posting the info on your machine. If we all put our heads together, I'm sure we can come up with a winner. I have been working on a carver that has a main body much like the inner frame of your old model. On top of each side I have mounted 1/2" travel rods from old printers. On each rod is the travel sleeve from the printer. The sleeves move freely the length of the main body frame. Attached to the two sleeves are two peices of 3/4" plywood hinged together. One of the hinged sections is attached to the sleeves and the other half is able to rise as high as you like and drop down about 1 1/2". The router and stylis are mounted side by side to the free moving part of plywood.As the top travels the length of the machine with the stylis riding on the model, the router cuts the blank as it rotates inches away. This machine also has a threaded rod attached to the top plywood router base and as the rod turnes thru a threaded nut in the router base it pushes and pulls the assembly back and forth. As with your machine, limit switches can be added to stop the travel at any point as needed. If the width of the main body is widened, You could put the stylis in the middle and have two router on each side. This would allow you to duplicate four baits at a time. There is also a rod attached to the hinged router base that extends up and over the fixed part of the top plywood to with weight added to counter ballance the weight of the router or routers. Hope this all made some sense. I have drawings somewhere, I'll see if I can find them. My drive motor is a small elec. motor with a drill chuck epoxied in place and operated by an old sewing machine foot pedal. Joe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I should just send my money to jerry and have him build me one . Or move to florida and sleep in his garage and use his stuff when or if he leaves the shop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Red-

I see you have the "pestor" gang back together. Thanks for the picture, at least I have some concept of what is going on. Without fully understanding this venture I may ask some pretty dumb questions.

Is the angle grinder doing all the work including the cutting wheel?

Could a dremel with a rip/crosscut blade be used for the cutting of the lure?

I am sure there is a bunch more questions, but I wouldn't have the foggiest idea of what I would be talking about.

Tally

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, the grinder does all the cutting. I mounted a 4 inch biscut cutting blade on it. it might be able to use a slightly larger trim saw blade also.

I dont think a dremel saw blade will cut deep enough & the motor housing would get in the way. the bevel gear housing on the angle grinder is what limits the cutting depth on this one too (to 7/8")

if you were able to mount the dremel upright & use a routing bit, (as mentioned above by Joe & weighinalimit) that might work. I went for speed & decided on a circular cutting blade.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Right after I ran the first test an Idea smacked me in the head, so I'm gonna attempt to rebuild it to allow me to feed an 8 foot piece of stock into it instead of adding fresh blanks after every cycle.

Red-

any updates?

Tally

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Red-

I found this information looking around on the net. Like I said before, this stuff is way over my head but this looked pretty interesting. Especially if you want to duplicate more than one at a time. Here it is.

Duplicators are essentially like key duplicators that you might have watched in operation at hardware stores. The cutter(s) are moved in response to any movement of the tracing stylus. There are 2-D, 3-D, and spindle duplicators. The 2-D versions are used by wood sign cutters and are of no use for carving. These machines come in single and multiple spindles options. A single spindle (cutter) duplicator is fairly inexpensive and they increase in price rapidly for each new cutter. Only one duplicate can be made for each tracing with a single spindle (cutter), but an extra duplicate can be made with each additional spindle (cutter) with the same tracing effort. The original and duplicates are mounted on rotating plates so the sculptures stand on the plates.

A Spindle mount option:

With a "spindle carving" option these machines can be set to work horizontally where the original and duplicates are mounted on end points like a carving lathe. The horizontal position allows you to duplicate any kind of long carving and stacked multiples. Stacked multiples are several carvings mounted one on top of the other like a totem pole. This is referred to as stacking up a set (4-up, 6-up, 8-up ...). This totem pole is carved and then sawed off to separate the individual objects. So if you have 16 spindle cutters carving something set 6-up, then your efforts would produce 96 individual objects with minimal extra work.

Tally

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know this post is very old, but I was wondering if it was still possible to see the attached images for the Dupli-k8r?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think this thread was the 2nd revision, there was a 3rd. I cant find the thread, but there's a video of it working....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good Lord compaired to you guys if my brain was lard it wouldn't grease a very big pan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately I could not get the image up, will try again later. Well done for continuing the development.

This is a horse I need to get back on. My previous attempts had too much slop, but I have ideas to remedy this. Your new prototype could start a new round of dupli-wars!

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dupli-wars II! :eek:

You guys already had me debating this again:

DSCN5647.jpg

What have you done? My mind is filled with rebuilding Z axis, and free floating carriages and OH MY!

:cry:

G

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll get some images of what I have been working on, building the proto out of wood to iron out the bugs.

 

Any updates from the above posts? Still have all your digits? :lolhuh: 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have ideas. Might build something soon.

 

Start a new thread with it.

 

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, a 9 year old topic  :blink: I'm getting old.

 

I haven't had anything assembled & cutting in years.

What I cobbled together was about as elegant as you could ask with a wood structure.

I've seen some really nice metal contraptions since then.

 

Ironically, I have some machining tools now but no time to revive this beast ATM.

Feel free to improve the concept.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Update,

 

I have found a power supply and various other electrical components, just need to source some relays and limit switches; and some circuit breakers. 

 

The electrical side will be basic,

 

- Push button to start cycle

- Table will traverse, hit limit switch and traverse back contacting a limit that will stop the cycle.

 

Can any one see any trouble if the cutter (biscuit jointer blade) passes back over the already cut surface? Otherwise I will need a pneumatic actuator and trigger this to lift the cutter for the return pass... I can't see any problem, as it will be tracing off the master.

 

I'm looking at using wiper motors, they seem pretty damn reliable and are cheap enough. My power supply is either 240v/110v to 12vdc so it will work out great with wiper motors off a car.

 

At this stage I'm wishing I had a metal lathe, the wooden prototype is O.K. but I feel a more solidly built machine from steel or aluminium would be far nicer. I'm leaning towards a steel build for ease of welding etc.

 

I need to figure out how I will secure the blank, any ideas? Also would be interested in a chuck I could feed a long timber blank through, this would be ideal! Where would I look for that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems feasible,

For traversing, I drilled and tapped a block of HDPE then split the block in half along the thread, if you offset those blocks it will allow you to engage and disengage from the allthread to manually move the carriage when needed.

 

Alot of people prototype with aluminum extrusion, think its called 8020 or something, its a little pricey, but you get to fab with metal and you can cut it with a chopsaw.

 

if you go with a chuck, it'll likely need to be a 4 jaw,  avoid independent chucks as they're usually used for offset work.

After you find one the task becomes mounting it to something other than a lathe :)

 

Hope it helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't see the need to return the cutter to the start position. I simply cut the next body in the revearse direction.

 

There are a lot of electronic component houses that do postal, like Maplin or RS components for example.

 

I never did find a super duper way of securing the blank. I used a brass plate with two brass pointed pins soldered in, soldered onto a 6mm dia brass rod. I tap the rod to engage the pins in the blank and lock the rod with a collar against the rod bearing. Crude, but it did the job. I imagine you are looking for something a bit slicker.

 

DAve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You cant climb cut backward if:

  • You tilt or angle the blade whatsoever (non-perpendicular)
  • Your cutting a bait with a steep edge (popper for example)
  • Your drive motor is non-reversible :)

I secured my blanks using countersink bits and/or simple phillips head bits, like a spur drive on a lathe.

Not a problem for soft woods.... might need something more robust for hardwoods.

 

Cant comment on electronics, I avoided them on this project. All I used was a switch, 2 motors (1 cutting 1 drive) and a speed controller for the drive motor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Points noted Jerry.

 

In my case I passed all three points.

 

There is a way to make wiper motors reversable, I remember reading. That was my plan, but never got around to it.

 

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the replies,

 

Great idea using Phillips head bits! This will save hours of labour making something that is pretty much the same.

 

As for the electronics side of things I'm pretty lucky in this respect, I work in a highly automated sawmill/planer mill; so access to any gizmo is very easy and there is Systems Engineers and Shift Electricians who know how to make any piece of kit do anything. The power supply came from a redundant project where we were using a Co2 laser to apply a # code so it can be tracked throughout the process. The laser would print a 4 digit number on the board at a belt speed of around 400-450mpm.

 

I like the idea of drilling the UHMWPE and offsetting, much like a quick release vice! I was going to try and track down a proper lead screw, what I have found so far is pricey and being a hack this is out of my scope.

 

I really like the extruded aluminium, I nearly secured a whole lot at work from an optimiser built in Europe (they love this aluminium stuff) but one engineer realised what it's worth and stubbed that out! It would be easier to work with however, tapping and drilling holes, cutting... Plus we have all the nuts and bolts that fit in the slots at work. I will try and track some down for the final build.

 

Can't help thinking how many baits I could have just made rather than messing with this... :drool:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Working on a chuck using SketchUp for feeding a long timber blank into instead of separate pieces. Hmmm I need a big bearing! and a bigger work bench...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now