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Mudd Butt Baits

Adding Scent To The Plastic.

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I see people are pouring it in when they are ready to pour, others are putting it in the bag after pouring.  The plastic in non pourous so it will not soak the scent up. I am going to add earthworm to my next batch and see if that works.  Do you guy pour with out scent?

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The plastic will be permeated with the scent within a few days just pouring it in the bag. Amazing how fast the plastisol soaks up scent or oil.

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Depends on the scent, Dinp based scents will last longer than others as the plastic will absorb them best. I have opened bags that have been sitting for over a year that smell like i bagged them yesterday. 

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I am thinking more along the lines of the bait not being in the bag, but in the water.  Once in the water the scent will wash.  Putting the scent in the melted plastic should keep it in the plastic even when in water for an hour?  I am sure that any scent will stay in a bag?

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I am thinking more along the lines of the bait not being in the bag, but in the water.  Once in the water the scent will wash.  Putting the scent in the melted plastic should keep it in the plastic even when in water for an hour?  I am sure that any scent will stay in a bag?

 

the baits will absorb the scent, so there shouldn't be an issue ;)

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I've always been a fan of adding scent in the plastic just before pouring.  I know if I use something like anise, I can still smell anise on the bait after several casts.  That is if I leave the same bait on for any length of time without catching a fish.  LOL

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That is kind of what I was thinking.  I could lie to my buddies and say it has salt in them by putting salt in the bag, but as soon as it hits the water it is gone.  May try, salt, coffee and some liquid scents. Any work better then the next?

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Exterior salt is generally just used in packaging to keep your baits from sticking together, so you're right.......once it hits the water, it's pretty much gone.  Adding salt to the plastic will, of course, make the bait sink.........and some will argue that the salt taste will help the fish hold on longer to the bait.  I'm not entirely convinced that's true, but many fishermen swear by it. 

 

As for scents, everyone has their favorite.  I'm a fan of crawfish and/or anise.  Haven't had much luck with coffee, earthworm, berries, etc.

 

Again, you'll probably get differences of opinions here, but my favorite brand was Pro Cure.  It mixed well with the plastic and held the scent for a long time.  Upper Hand Scents is another awesome product.  It all depends on what works for you. 

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Actually doing both achieves the same thing, yes pouring scent into the plastic before pouring the bait does work but you lose some scent due to the heating process, but also using a good plastisizer mixed with the scent as said above will achieve exactly the same thing. The plastisizer is absorbed into the bait all the way to the core of the bait, but of course you lose some scent due to mixing it with plastisizer. Either process you use will hold scent as long as the other but using the cold method, you do have to allow time for the plastisizer to absorb into the bait. Once it is absorbed into the bait, it will not wash off and you are achieving the same thing as if you are adding scent to the hot plastic. It really dosen't matter which process you choose to get the scent into the plastic, as long as the scent is there. It is just a matter of personal preference. I have added scented plastisizer to a bag of baits and the baits actually were dry after 2 or 3 days because they absorbed the plastisizer.

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I am thinking more along the lines of the bait not being in the bag, but in the water.  Once in the water the scent will wash.  Putting the scent in the melted plastic should keep it in the plastic even when in water for an hour?  I am sure that any scent will stay in a bag?

Ever have a bait that got a little bit of gasoline fumes on it? The smell lasts forever. Same with quality scents. The oil based will last for-ever. Water based will wash off.

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This will sound crazy to some of you...It is common practice here in the deep, deep south to spray soft plastic baits with WD 40. Most swear by it.

Any thoughts or experience?

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How Deep South are you? I'm central Alabama myself and have heard of people using WD40 on their baits but I've never tried it myself. Don't see why it couldn't work, that stuff works on everything else you put it on!

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Bassinfool, I live in the southern most mainland of South Florida, a few miles from the Florida Keys.

 

We have the best of both worlds, great freshwater fishing and great saltwater fishing from Everglades Sawgrass to Blue Water Ocean.

 

A lot of folks down here spray WD 40 on both live and artificial baits,

 

Me? I never tried it because I have always caught my fish without needing to add scent of any kind. Just lucky I guess....

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Mudd Butt Baits, if you are asking about WD 40 or any other external scent for that matter, there is no need or reason for the scent to be incorporated in the body of the bait. The scent need only cling to the outside and leave a scent trail.

 

If the scent is in the bait it will not leave a scent trail. The external application of a scent will "wash-off" but, it can be reapplyed again and again.

 

I don't see fish tasting, that is chewing on a bait before striking it. That is the only way for a scent incorporated bait would be of any use. Correct me if I am wrong, I usually am...  

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I wadefish in texas. If I have a bag of clearish baits that get water in the bag and sit overnight the baits get a milky color to them. I would say that's absorbing water. Water evaporates and the baits go back to normal if you take them out and let them dry. But oil doesn't. So I guess the oil will be in them forever or until you fish one worm for hours and hours. Enough time to allow the oil to be replaced by water. But I don't think the scent ever really leaves. This made my decision for me. If I add scent it will be in the bag. Thanks!   BTW Im new here. Love the site!

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up north in Michigan we use wd40 for trolling walleyes...it works  mades a lot of test with it..same baits with out and with...it was a 5 to 1 with using wd40..but we have found dr. juice tournament walleye scent works better...so the boat has lots of it onboard..

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Main ingredient in WD40 is fish oil... Use it on marshmallows to catch trout...... Any reason regular fish oil won't work as a scent on soft plastics???

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Main ingredient in WD40 is fish oil... Use it on marshmallows to catch trout...... Any reason regular fish oil won't work as a scent on soft plastics???

 

Guess again, WD40 is a petroleum based product.

 

Taken directly from their website

 

"Myth: WD-40 contains fish oil.

Fact:

Consumers have told us over the years that they have caught some of the biggest fish ever after protecting their fish hooks and lures withWD-40.  We believe this legend came from folks assuming that the product must contain fish oil since it appears to attract fish.  Sorry Charlie®, it just ain’t so.

WD-40 Company has taken steps to respect and conserve the environment, and encourages its users to do the same.  While WD-40can be used to help protect fishing equipment from rust and corrosion, WD-40 Company does not recommend using WD-40 to attract fish."

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Confirmed via Wikipedia... No fish oil in WD40... Never the less... Fish oil as a scent for soft plastics??... Anyone tried this??

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