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fishnart

A Question And A Thought...

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I thought I'd asked this somewhere in a post but I can't find it, but what are the advantages and how important is it to heat set your paint before using your top coat. I'm sorry if you answered this somewhere else hahaha.

 

Also, I was just thinking about the post about baits yellowing and had an idea that I'm sure someone will be able to address. I used to use Lacquer thinner to thin my epoxy and it was a yellowish, pinkish color. You guys taught me to use alcohol which I now do. I'm wondering if that lacquer thinner that I used, or we use, might help turn baits the pinkish color??? Just a thought and I'm sure someone knows the answer to this. 

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OK I did a search on heat setting. So let me revise my question, for those that heat set between colors, what if I just let it air dry (using water based paint)? Is that good enough or is there still a benefit to drying it. Also if I let a bait set over night before epoxying it, is that going to be dry enough. I do my baits in a heated basement. Or is it still beneficial to heat dry it? Again...thanks 

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I dont have much experience but IMO heat setting is a must. I just dont think you get the same results letting it air dry...

 

How long would you let it dry before applying the other coat? I feel like air drying will allow moisture to be trapped under the top coat and cause bubbling issues, but I could be wrong.

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Air drying is fine and coats can be laid over each other with no issues.  One just has to let the paint dry before applying topcoat. 

 

I honestly believe that most of the troubles people encounter in lure making are self inflicted and mainly center around one just not taking their time.  I have no issues with having cranks in various states of completion and no strange need to rush things.  I could be wrong as I never have experienced 95% of the issues I see guys having so evidently doing something wrong.   :?

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When I go out to the garage to work, I want to complete as much as I can in the time I have.  Heating the paint so it dries faster let's me recoat more quickly, and gives me a shot at finishing my painting in one session.

I find that, if I don't heat set my paint, it stays gummie feeling, like it hasn't really dried.

I don't know how I could be sure one coat is dry enough before I put on another without hitting it with a hair dryer.

Trapped moisture is a death sentence for any lure's top coat.  It will fail.  It is just a question of when, because the paint film is never truly hard, and exposure to sun or heat will cause trapped moisture to vaporize, and expand, lifting the top coat.

Hair dryers are cheap (free, if your wife isn't looking).  I don't think my paint gets hot enough to truly change into a waterproof state, like when you iron it onto a T shirt, but it does get dry, quickly, and that's what I'm looking for.

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If you're talking about true "heat setting" of Createx, you have to get it hot enough to actually melt the latex in the paint.  This is done so it will adhere to cloth in T-shirts and the required temp is much higher than you want to heat a crankbait, lest you melt/blow it up (plastic) or cause air in a wood bait to expand and bubble the undercoating and paint layers.  When we "heat set" paint on a crankbait, we are really just making sure that the paint is completely dry.  I dry each color shot with a hair dryer because it's the best way to insure paint is dry before adding more.  It will air dry eventually if you want, but I think a hair dryer or heat gun is a quick guarantee in the finish process.  I just heat the paint until all the water gloss is gone and then add a few seconds to make sure.

 

On your lacquer thinner question, I don't know if there is an answer because the stuff is usually a mix of solvents a manufacturer decides to put in a can and label "lacquer thinner".  I use it to clean my epoxy brushes and tools but stopped putting it in epoxy when I discovered several problems with the end result. 

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I am on the side of those that feel heat setting is not required, but that drying with a hair dryer or heat gun (mine came from Harbor Freight) is a useful shortcut.  I never have problems with my Cretex or other Acrylic paints.

 

Now, Lacquer thinner? Never use it myself.  After all, Createx is not a lacquer.  I do not add anything not compatible with Acrylic or Latex.  I clean with water and a little dish detergent.  When I need a "deep cleaning", I use some of the Createx cleaner for air brushes.  If I really want to deep clean, I use acetone.  None of these have any yellowish or pinkish or any other color.

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