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Etex Keeps Covering Line Tie And Hook Eyes Need Some Advice

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Ok I have been trying to make my own baits for a while and i finalyl got a few that work good finally.But i still have  a problem that just keeps happening.

The etex epoxy keeps covering my  eyes that the hooks hang on and the line tie in my bait.

then if i try to chisel etc it off it cranks sometimes and the bait kinda looks bad sometimes from it.

I love the look the tex gives but really need some help on cpould be doing wrong.

I have a spinner and everything.

Could I be applying it to thick or?

Maybe  ishould let it sit some after mixing to let it thicken?

any help would be appreciated.

I use scotch tape to protect the diving bill would love a better way to do that as well thanks guys in advance

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First of all you shouldn't have to tape the lip when top coating. I made that mistake the first couple of baits I built and it resulted with the edge of the blue painters tape stuck under layers of epoxy. Trust me. It doesn't look good.

 

As far as the line ties and hook hangers getting filled with epoxy that's not a major concern either. Let the epoxy cure and then just drill out the eye with a small drill bit. You can then scrape the sides of the hangers with an Exacto knife and it will peel right off.

 

If your getting huge amounts of epoxy either on the lip or on the hangers then you could be applying too much at one time. Etex is designed for counter tops, bar tops, etc. so it is much more fluid than some of your other epoxies. This is to ensure that it self levels. As a rule you need to apply multiple thin coats of Etex on a lure so you don't end up with runs, drips or sags.

 

Letting it sit after it's been mixed is something recommended by a lot of people that use it with sitting times as much as 15 minutes. This will allow it to thicken a bit as well as allow the bubbles to dissipate.

 

good luck,

 

Ben

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yes u described it perfectly when I go to remove the tape the far edge next to the nose of the bait is stuck then i have to carve/cut and then the bait looks awful in the front.I think u may be right cause I load the brush then spread it out.So how thin is thin?

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I knew you were going to ask that. :lol:

 

That's something that is really hard to explain. When I first started building baits Etex was what I started with as a top coat. After coating several baits and ending up with quite a few drips and sags I finally figured out how much was too much. Describing how to do that is harder than figuring it out. For me at least. I would say that instead of loading your brush as full as possible to dip up less on the brush. If it starts to leave voids on the bait then add a little more Etex to the brush. One thing about Etex is that you have plenty of working time so there's no need to be in a rush. Start out slowly and try to leave as uniform a coating as possible on the bait. One thing that helps is if you hold the bait at different angles under a bright light. That way you will be able to see any voids or bubbles in the coating. As long as your getting complete coverage you won't be putting it on too thin. When I was using Etex I usually applied three thin coats. That is after I learned that you can't get away with one thick coat of Etex. The properties of this type of epoxy just won't allow it.

 

hope this helps,

 

Ben

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:? Yep its way to much then bud.Cause once i put it on there i have to spread it our real good and sometimes i can wisk some off of one bait and use it on another.I may try to do like paper thin coats and apply it like u said just barley dip the brush in the etex

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You can probably put it on a little thicker than "paper thin", but it's not a bad way to start out since you will eventually see what will work and what won't. Just be sure to rotate it under a bright light while looking at the bait from all angles to make sure you have complete coverage. Complete coverage will look shiny while voids in the top coat will appear as dull spots. Before long you will get a "feel" for what works and what doesn't as well as what to look for in the way of potential screw ups and know what to do to avoid them before they happen.

 

Ben

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never tried etex but can clear 8 1.5s before devcom sets. one coat and done no turner just let hang to dry. no runs no dry spots either.  the key is the brush you use to apply it with.

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Some times its good that it covers the eye hole! seals the bait around the eye. I use a dremmel tool with a small drill bit to clean it out. Sometimes water can seep into unwanted holes. I'd rather clean out the holes and make sure all holes are filled. Trick is, before you put it on the drying wheel, clean the holes out with your application brush. Also you might be putting too much on, I start at the head of the bait, just touch on the outside of the paint with the epoxy and pull backward down the bait working towards the tail. once i have full coverage I take off the excess by brushing from nose to tail and cleaning the excess epoxy off the brush into the container. remember a little goes a long way! I put tape on the first part of my bills just so my alligator clips on my drying wheel have something to bite into. Hope this helps.

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can i coat them before i put them on the rotating dryer or would it be best to coat them while o nthe dryer?

 

I always brush the epoxy on and then put them on the drying wheel. It's much easier for me to hit a stationary target than it is a moving one.

 

Ben

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Yes , for all means coat them before putting them before the wheel makes life much easier. You can start and stop the wheel while putting the lures on. A little start stop won't make the epoxy run.

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I don't try to avoid brushing epoxy on the hook hangers or line tie.  I just use a Dremel with a 1 mm drill bit to zip it out after the epoxy is cured hard.

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we do the same as bob p.. on straight baits and joints on swim baits with tite tolerances we use different clears.

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If you're making jointed baits, one trick I learned was to coat the inside of the joints with D2T, lapping it 1/4" onto the face of each section.  The D2T didn't sag, and one coat was all I needed inside the joints.

Then, I'd assemble the bait, put it on my ferris wheel lure turner, coat it with Etex, and then turn on the motor and let it turn.

My turner motor was 1 rpm, so I had time to really inspect, remove drips, and touch up dry spots.

Having the Etex lap over the D2T that 1/4" made for a really good lap joint that disappeared by the second coat of Etex.

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I've used a lighter and heated up the clogged eyes which was easy and let the paint and epoxy on the eyes peel off leaving the eyes bare stainless steel. It was pretty clean looking.

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