jkwildhunting

Air Brush Compressor

8 posts in this topic

I am in need of finding a airbrush compressor. I wouldn't mind getting one with a tank so it is not running the whole time I paint.

Harbor freight has 3 gal for 39.99. Does anyone run one? I see it may be noisey but have a idea of building a noise box to help but wanted to see if this would work. I do this as a hobby so I run it few times a week for few hours

http://m.harborfreight.com/3-gal-13-hp-100-psi-oilless-pancake-air-compressor-61615.html

Thanks

Joe

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I have i similar looking compressor, sold as a quiet model.

The thing is, adding the muffler on the intake made all the difference - without it's just as noisy as any old garage compressor.

Don't know if that is possible to do with this model, most compressors don't have a tubular air intake so the only option is to enclose the whole thing in a sound trap just as you plan to do.

 

It should be possible to separate the compressor and air tank so you just have to shield the compressor part, I did this on a regular garage compressor with good results - this also allows you to have the tank close to where you work and the compressor quite a bit away. Don't forget to add some fans in the sound trap to avoid over heating though.

If you go this route it's also important to use metal tubing. The air temperature just after the compressor is quite hot and will melt regular hoses.

I also added a moisture trap, air filter and a pressure regulator just by the work bench so I can easily adjust the pressure without having to move.

 

But, if it's possible to add a muffler this will most likely be cheaper and definitely less work :)

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I'm failing to see the need to separate the tank and compressor Mooki. Couldn't you just run a supply line from wherever you place the compressor to your work station? You could still place the regulator, moisture trap and oil separator (if needed) on your work bench with a quick connect to attach the air hose. Am I missing something here?

 

Ben

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Thanks for the feedback.

I don't mind spending the $$ on something nice. I had looked earlier at California air compressor and for some reason I saw 350-500 as price tag. Little to much for my liking. I researched this afternoon and saw home depot has them 20% off. I could get them for around 200 which is still a lot of coin but if they are super quiet and will last 5+years then to me it could be worth the money.

Has anyone had any issues with the California air compressor. Likes or dislikes besides the hefty price tag.

Thanks

Joe

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I use the little Harbor Freight airbrush compressor and it works great not load and air builds up real quick and  water catch.

 

Jeff 

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I made my compressor which is similar to the Silentaire type. i bought a harbor freight pancake compressor,stripped the compressor and used the tank. Then mounted a used 1/4 hp refrigeration compressor on it. Ran a few copper lines,installed an unloader valve from grainger,muffler,pressure regulator with oil and water trap and walla- Silentaire compressor for under $200 bucks. Works awesome, quite, makes plenty of pressure and volume 

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I'm failing to see the need to separate the tank and compressor Mooki. Couldn't you just run a supply line from wherever you place the compressor to your work station? You could still place the regulator, moisture trap and oil separator (if needed) on your work bench with a quick connect to attach the air hose. Am I missing something here?

 

Ben

The reasons are two fold.

A smaller cabinet is needed for sound suppression since only the compressor is noisy. Of course you can put the tank just outside the cabinet if that suits better.

Having the tank closer to the work bench reduces "lag" (not a problem with airbrushing, but when consuming higher volumes of air the supply line acts restrictive).

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The reasons are two fold.

A smaller cabinet is needed for sound suppression since only the compressor is noisy. Of course you can put the tank just outside the cabinet if that suits better.

Having the tank closer to the work bench reduces "lag" (not a problem with airbrushing, but when consuming higher volumes of air the supply line acts restrictive).

 

Thanks Mooki. I figured you had a good reason for doing it that way.

 

Ben

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