dchance

Jig Hanging Rack For Curing

36 posts in this topic

I use toaster ovens and need ideas for a simple but effective rack that fits in a toaster oven to hang jigs on to cure. I currently use a homemade deal that has some wood but that gets to stinking up my basement. Lol.

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My toaster oven has one middle rack.  I guess you could make another rack using heavy screening, chicken wire, light metal fence wire, or something like that.  My oven only has room for the one rack.

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I use the racks that come withe the oven. I can knock down a hundred at a time.

If you want a stand, go to TJ's tackle. He sells some that clip together, hook eye up.

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Edited by Walking Dead

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man that is nice. I just use 2 smaller toaster ovens and there is not enough room to hang on the toaster's rack. those ones that clip together are pretty cool. Pretty sure I can conjure up something with stuff I have laying around, just looking for other ideas/perspectives.

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get urself some tin, fab a tray with high sides just so it slides into oven. attach wire from one end to another with slight bends in it  , i will post pics of my old setup i have been usin for awhile. nothin fancy cheap to make and does the job.

 

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Edited by archery1
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I use the rack that came with the oven.  The wire in my rack runs front to back and that is what makes this method work.

 

Get some threaded rod, I use 7/16 or 1/2 as I'm doing larger jigs.

 

Now put one jig on each wire and then take a piece of threaded rod and roll the jigs to the back of the rack.

 

Repeat till the rack is full.

 

I just bought a new oven last month.  I can do well over 200 1-1.5 ounce jigs at a time.  This is the oven.  http://www.walmart.com/ip/16503576

 

It cam with two racks.  If I were doing smaller jigs I'd get some smaller threaded rod and use both racks.  

 

I've also used 1/4" x 1/2" angle aluminum and cut it to size to fit in the oven and then drilled holes in it.  I used cup hooks in the holes and hung jigs and slabs from the hooks.  Works great for slabs but the you can't get quite as many jigs as the above method.

 

The aluminum is available at most any hardware store.  I used 1/4" cup hooks which I had to order.  You can either cut the aluminum to fit where the racks fit in the oven or modify the rack that came with the oven to support it.  I found modifying the racks to work better as every oven I've seen only has partial support on the right hand side. 

Edited by LimpNoodle
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I use a cake cooling rack custom bent to give clearance to the jigheads and fit in the ovens rack slots.  With 3 jigheads per section of wire it holds 54 jigheads.

 

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LimpNoodle - I really like the threaded rod solution - clever.

 

Dave

 

Not my idea.  Just learned about it myself a couple of weeks ago.

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Before I got my large oven, I just turned the small oven upside down. Only thing that is different is the door opens up and you have to hold it or prop it up with something to get your jigs out.

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Here is a pic of mine. Way back in the day, I laser cut my sides out of aluminum and used all thread rod to put it together with nuts and lock washers. Get the all-thread, you will never regret it as it will keep the jigs from sliding into each other when they are hot and then ruining your paint job. I used 10-24 threaded rod with matching nuts and #10 lockwashers.

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I use a regular oven and I use aluminum bread pans with the corners cut, then holes punched with an old paper hole punch and put the hook in the hole after you powder it.  

 

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I bake mine in my wife's oven in the kitchen and hang them on the regular oven racks.  But, I put an old cookie sheet underneath to catch any drips.

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I bake mine in my wife's oven in the kitchen and hang them on the regular oven racks.  But, I put an old cookie sheet underneath to catch any drips.

I would get away with that ONE time before the end would come lol.

 

I would never do them in my regular cooking oven. But that's just me. For as cheap as you can find them at yard sales..............

I have 2 that are very large for baking jigs up to 8oz. Both were under $10 and the one looks new. I just don't want that in the oven I feed my family with. Thinner coats will do away with the drips. IMO, you shouldn't be getting drips.

 

I can feel that frying pan hitting my head lol. Hope the pan doesn't break!  :eek:

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DSC 0015~2

 

I made this when I first started pp jigs. I would get too much paint on the jig and hanging it by the hook would get cone heads. Don't use it anymore. Learned how not to get too much paint on the jigs. :D   

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Anyone looking to buy some homemade jigs I am 15 and live in Willard MO and want to try to make a business out of it message me on Facebook messenger my name is zane brown 

 

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1 hour ago, Zane said:

Anyone looking to buy some homemade jigs I am 15 and live in Willard MO and want to try to make a business out of it message me on Facebook messenger my name is zane brown 

 

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Zane:  You made some beautiful jigs there!

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11 hours ago, Zane said:

Anyone looking to buy some homemade jigs I am 15 and live in Willard MO and want to try to make a business out of it message me on Facebook messenger my name is zane brown 

 

IMG_20180213_200246441.jpg

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If you want to start a business I say good for you.  However, your first lesson is the Government wants their cut.  For every jig you sell you have to pay a 10% excise tax.

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14 hours ago, Zane said:

Anyone looking to buy some homemade jigs I am 15 and live in Willard MO and want to try to make a business out of it message me on Facebook messenger my name is zane brown 

 

IMG_20180213_200246441.jpg

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Yes as was said you must have a EIN with the feds and pay your 10%

Advertising on the internet is the easiest way to get caught if you're not paying.

There is no hobby level or kids level everyone who sells tackle must pay quaterly using form 720.

 

Also just so you know this site isn't for tackle sales but to learn how to make your own tackle.

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