dchance

Jig Hanging Rack For Curing

36 posts in this topic

I use a heat gun from start to finish. Base coat goes  on with heat gun and then rewarm jig with heat gun to do  multiple colored layers afterward. Use what works for you. Some guys use a torch here as well . I would stay away from candles, as they cause soot, which emits oils and can have an issue with powder paint. Also candle heat is very inconsistent

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Pepmeier said:

So do you guys always heat your jigs up with a heat gun/torch/lighter for your first cost? Then just bake to cure?

Don't use a lighter you will darken your jigs buy a heat gun it is a lot easier as well

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My setup is a bit different.

But then again so are many of my jigs.

For small jigs I use the racks from TJ's tackle and an adjustable temp heat gun for heating.

But I do make a lot of bigger saltwater jigs. These jigs can go from 1 ounce up to 48 ounce though 4 oz- 24oz are the most common.

Many are slab type jigs with an eyelet on each end with a hook added later.

I have a double rack oven. I preheat in the oven set at 500*f.

Then I grab them with my Homemade ss hook tool and dip in my powder paint.

Often a white basecoat is put on first then a dip in the primary color.

Accent colors go on with  a powder paint airbrush amd they get a final dip in UV blast.

All on one heat.

I guess the big jigs hold enough heat for this. Small jigs would need a reheat.

Then I hang to cool until I have the jigs done I needed to make.

I have hooks in my oven made from sinker slide wires. The smaller loop hangs on the oven racks and I open the loop on the bigger side wider than normal and dispose of the plastic slider part.

I can hang 14 smaller say 4oz-10oz jigs vertically from the upper rack.

For the longer jigs they hang horizontally one hook on each end of the jig and I can get 7 on each rack for 14 total this way.

These jigs can be 10.5" long so this works well.

Then  I set my oven at 450*f in the convection setting to cure for 30 minutes.

450* because that puts my actual oven temp close to 400* and ~ 30 minutes gives them a full 20 minutes at the 400* as my oven is usually cold to start with.

Like I said though this method is mainly for longer bigger jigs than the average person would make.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/19/2016 at 8:25 AM, dchance said:

man that is nice. I just use 2 smaller toaster ovens and there is not enough room to hang on the toaster's rack. those ones that clip together are pretty cool. Pretty sure I can conjure up something with stuff I have laying around, just looking for other ideas/perspectives.

 

When I used a toaster oven with small opening, I flipped the oven upside down and used the rack that came with it. Worked great for the smaller jigs. Found very large opening toaster ovens at yard sale, they do up to my 8 oz. jigs on down just fine. Some of my jigs just have the brass eye, I use some old size 1 to 1/0 jig hooks to hang them with in the oven. The hook eye helps keep the jig on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's the homemade rack I use. I bought 2 of the galvanized plates used to nail 2x4s together. Drilled holes in them for a couple of small diameter threaded rods. On one plate the rods are secured using hex nuts. One the other plate, wing nuts. I got a sack full of small flat washers from an industrial supply house and put them on the rods, then the free moving plate and wing nuts. I can hang my jigs on the rods using the washers as spacers. Then tighten the wing nuts to hold them tight. I flip the rack over then so my jigs are standing up. This prevents any excess paint from making a cone head. 

20180218_093310.jpg

20180218_093805.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, ScottV said:

Here's the homemade rack I use. I bought 2 of the galvanized plates used to nail 2x4s together. Drilled holes in them for a couple of small diameter threaded rods. On one plate the rods are secured using hex nuts. One the other plate, wing nuts. I got a sack full of small flat washers from an industrial supply house and put them on the rods, then the free moving plate and wing nuts. I can hang my jigs on the rods using the washers as spacers. Then tighten the wing nuts to hold them tight. I flip the rack over then so my jigs are standing up. This prevents any excess paint from making a cone head. 

20180218_093310.jpg

20180218_093805.jpg

 

Awesome idea.  I'm stealing that one.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now