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Two Topcoats

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I was reading the topcoat thread and was wondering if anyone had played around with applying two topcoats that are different. Like etex under a harder topcoat for example. Would a softer under layer add cushion to make a harder surface less brittle? 

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I was thinking along the same lines Mark although with a slightly different analogy. I was picturing a sheet of glass on a bed.

 

Ben

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I also think Etex over a harder finish would be more resilient.  Even more resilient would be simply multiple coats of Etex.  But I have to ask:  What's the point in all of this?  Do lots of your lures chip and crack?  Mine don't.  Yes, I have slammed an epoxy coated lure against the motor hood at 60 mph and cracked the finish (not to mention dented the motor).  But it's not like I'm breaking lures every time out fishing.  It's a rare, unusual event and it's always caused by my own stupidity and not the finish.  Same with lures coated with MCU.  No lure is fishing proof or stupid proof.  Yes, more durable is better - up to a point.  The tipping point is where the extra steps you take to make the lure more durable begins to negatively affect its performance.

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I also think Etex over a harder finish would be more resilient.  Even more resilient would be simply multiple coats of Etex.  But I have to ask:  What's the point in all of this?  Do lots of your lures chip and crack?  Mine don't.  Yes, I have slammed an epoxy coated lure against the motor hood at 60 mph and cracked the finish (not to mention dented the motor).  But it's not like I'm breaking lures every time out fishing.  It's a rare, unusual event and it's always caused by my own stupidity and not the finish.  Same with lures coated with MCU.  No lure is fishing proof or stupid proof.  Yes, more durable is better - up to a point.  The tipping point is where the extra steps you take to make the lure more durable begins to negatively affect its performance.

 

Bob, I think you hit the nail on the head.

No lure is going to be indestructible.  

I just read an article about how Rapala field tests it's lures with their Prostaff, and they say that a percentage of really good prototypes are lost to pike and musky during field tests.  That has to hurt, but it shows them that a lure works, so it's not a total loss.

I'm pretty sure that, if a toothy critter wants to bite through your lure's finish, it will, or it'll just swallow it, cut your line,  and swim away laughing.

So I think we should try and figure out what works for us in our own lure making process, not what's "best".

It's like learning to fish.  The way that works for you is the best way, for you.

Edited by mark poulson
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Thanks for the thoughts. Agree softer over harder sounds better.

 

To answer the why bother question...I have a few baits like the glidn rap that are no longer made and would like to keep them for as long as possible. One in particular has a bit of magic, and I'll be sad when it dies. That one is worth more effort. I've just been sanding and coating with e-tex every year, and I try to have a few baits to rotate them before they get too destroyed. When they get bit to the wood the foil and plastic start to bubble up. But the longer I can use the hot bait the better :).

 

Also like salmo whitefish, but without an extra coat of epoxy they chip like crazy. 

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For me, smaller cranks seem more sensitive to refinishing than larger ones. I added a coat of MCU to a particularly effective small crank that I built which was showing some wear and it turned the crank into one that was not so special any more. That taught me something. Now I don't change a thing on a special bait. Not the finish, not the split rings, not the trebles. Nothing. Once the magic is gone, it can be very hard to get it back. Very small changes can have big effects on a crankbait's performance.

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For me it depends on the epoxy. I don't like two coats of devcon unless its on a larger bait, because its too thick. The new Art Resin however can be applied pretty thin and I can put on two coats, which is equal to one coat of devcon. I haven't tested the strength, but I don't fish for toothy fish either. I think if I m finishing bigger baits for toothy fishes, I'd use two coats of what ever???

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It was just an idea that was nagging at me. If I was applying two coatings anyways it wouldn`t be much more effort to use two types of coatings that complement each other. I was just curious as to what coatings play well together, or don`t...  What is winter for if not overthinking?

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