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Jwbright

Lures On A Lathe

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Does anyone still make wooden lures on a lathe? Used the search function and found some discussions but all were several years old. Has it died down or everyone just kinda know what they doing now and don't talk about it much?

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Still do but overall they are typically simplified lures to make (well I guess some of the styles).  What are you looking to do?

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@ Jwbright

 

I love making lureblanks on my lathe , ...maybe , it's because I do not have a bandsaw ???

 

Most likely I'm making versions of vintage lure models , for example the "Rush Tango Minnow" , but also  "Pikie" style lures , many other proven catchers of yesteryear can be made on a lathe , too !

 

Also I 've been into experiments with a few versions of typical striper bass lures , as already mentioned in another post above , ......many of these are perfectly suited for northern pike over here in Europe .

 

Is there anything in particular , that you'd like to know about turning down timber lures ?

 

Greetings , Dieter :yay:

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I suspected that properly scaled pikie or darter would work for pike, it's nice to have it confirmed, I actually expect that I will add a lathe to my work shop at some point.

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Most of the designs will be throw backs to old lures, if we are talking bass.  These lure designs aren't used that often anymore and are more nostalgic in nature and not really sought after for use.  They catch fish but simply if they worked as well as some remember wouldn't we still be using them.   :?  I have made a few spooks and devil horse type for some guys but don't turn too many lures for my own use.

 

Search vintage bass lures and you see many are lathe based mainly because of tooling available at the time.  oreno, lucky 13, vamp,  various creek chub, etc.....  all sorts of other strange turned baits with the usual plethora of trebles and propellers.  The more the better it would seam on some lures. A lot of turned bodies with metal lip attached or metal collar, etc...  Many are very impressive to look at and some will just make you laugh.

 

http://www.fieldandstream.com/photos/gallery/fishing/bass-fishing/2010/02/30-superlative-antique-fishing-lures-collector-rob-pavey

http://www.tacklecollecting.com/

Edited by Travis

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Are there some example's of lures turned on the lathe?

or a link to find them on the web

I don't mean to be bragging , ...but you may browse through my gallery , through the years I have made quite a few versions of different lathe turned lures , ....not the most prettiest lures though , but many variations .

 

http://www.tackleunderground.com/community/gallery/member/17895-diemai/

 

You might also check out this list-up of different collector's sites , .....a lot of vintage lure model were lathe-turned , ....you'd surely find some inspiration in there :

 

http://www.thehardbaitdatabase.com/Collector_s_Links.html

 

Good Luck , Dieter :yay:

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Like Pesca - I'm just getting started. Well, really I'm just in the researching phase, so I guess you could say I am JUST getting started. I hope Pesca won't mind, but I have a lathe question and since you guys are all already talking about it - can I threadjack a bit? 

 

Would you guys think that a beginner would be OK using a cheaper lathe to start, or should I just hold out and invest in a really good one from the start? 

 

Harbor Freight has one for under $200, but one from a big box store isn't much more than that. Just wondering what you lathe'rs (?) think of the cheap o versions of this tool? I don't want to waste money on an expensive lathe to find out I hate it, but then - I don't want to try to learn on junk, either. 

 

I'm out on a limb here betting that Pesca might find your answers interesting, too? 

:) 

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a cheaper lathe,s no issue. its your tools/chisels . buy the best you can afford.. buy calipers/verniers on measuring diameters. your good to have fun. and a way to control woodust/chips.

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I have owned two lathes and have used several other "midi" lathes.  While you don't have to drop a lot of money starting out I will tell you in my opinion a lot of difference when it comes to overall user experience and nothing worse than dropping a few hundred on junk to find out you like turning.   If you have a Woodcraft near I would recommend taking the "Learn to Turn" and a few other classes first to get familiar with things.  Depending on the instructor they can be very helpful in.  Mine was pretty quick to point out to recommend what to get and not to get (and was quite the opposite of a sales pitch for Woodcraft).  I used Rikon and Jet lathes in those classes and a few different models.   I have also used Grizzly, HF, Craftsman (pen lathe), and Delta.   

 

The Craftsman (I own) is a toy and isn't a fair comparison with the others.  I did not like using the HF but would take it over the Craftsman any day to the increased power and swing.  The Grizzly was very similar to the HF (many very similar knock offs just difference in quality control and specs of parts). The Grizzly lathe was smoother and less issues but not by much.  The two Grizzly lathes I used just felt more "solid" than the HF in operation the tailstock live centers (cheap enough) seamed to be better than those I have used on various HF lathes but may not be indicative.  I liked the Rikon and Jet both equally well and are in my opinion steps above both the HF and lower end Grizzly, but of course cost more.  I ended up with a Delta 46-460 as I just liked it better and was cheaper than the Jet I was looking at.  

 

For tools I started cheap as you will need to learn to sharpen and much rather eat up a Benjamin's Best (best value winner frequently) learning than higher end offerings.  I will be replacing these with better quality stuff as I go.  Currently I just end up sharpening more.  I have not been keen on the carbide cutters but that was limited to a few hours of use.  I ended up buying one thinking hey maybe if I used it more...it collects a lot of dust.  I still would try another one just to make sure.

 

Definitely have a budget as it can get pricey quickly.  You still need to sharpen, turning tools, live centers, chuck if you want to do other stuff, etc... it adds up.   You should be able to find the HF lathe for 50 bucks on Craigslist rather easily.  Often come across very good lathes with various centers, chucks, rests, turning tools, etc.. for not a bad price either that will come in a good deal overall.  Shop vac and dust deputy (or similar) set up is very nice to have to collect fines and shavings.  Doesn't take too long to build up a pile of shavings when turning.  

 

You may also want to look at wood turning clubs in your area.  These clubs often will have get together's and let you come to an event for free to see if you like it.  They are usually very desperate for guys (especially for non baby boomers)  to pass skill sets along to.  

Edited by Travis
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I use a cheaper lathe I bought online and I also use cheaper tools but I invested in a nice sharpener since my tools need frequent sharpening. 

 

I buy cedar deck spindles from the local box store and turn them. I've made spook type walking baits, crank baits and some old school lures (inspired by Diemai) and it's a ton of fun!

 

I recently turned a bluegill shaped lure on the lathe and then "flattened" the sides a bit using a belt sander. It worked out quite well until I drilled the ballast hole off center because I was in a hurry..... Oh well.

Edited by FrogAddict
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I use an old cast iron lathe I bought from a swap meet years ago.

I like a heavier bed to keep the vibration down to a minimum.

I got my lathe tools at swap meets, too, so they were better quality, with long handles.  

 

Long handles keep you safer, and sharp tools do, too.

Don't take too big a cut.  Keep the tool rest as close to the work as possible, and move it in as you remove material.  

A lathe tool that grabs and flips is one of the few things in life that exceed the speed of light!

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Weight is definitely your friend but can be a troublesome for some depending up on shop set up.  I had to be portable for my smaller shop  I ended up filling a false bottom of my stand with sand. Sharp tools make all the difference and a solid grinder becomes as really nice asset teamed up with some Norton wheels (cheap and effective). Now if one likes the carbide cutters no sharpening needed but very much different technique is needed.  I also use a full face mask as eventually something will essentially disintegrate if you turn enough.  

 

I have made a few flat sided lures on the lathe but start with flat sided stock.  As long as you don't get too aggressive no issues.  

 

Several good turning books also available.  Getting Started in Wood Turning  (American Association of Woodturners book) isn't too bad.  Most of the other easy ones to find aren't bad either just not as in depth.  

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I hear you Travis. I was turning some PVC and the whole thing flew off and luckily went away from me. I also use a full face shield. 

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GIANT ASH HONEY DIPPERS are much more fun. I made several hundred of these for bars around Boston. 

 

Edited by Salty's
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Hey Salty can I buy your lathe from you? Haha. So remind me, what is the point of a honey dipper of that size? I envy your lathes!

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Sure come pick it up Saturday $50k LOL

 

Those were bar tap handles for a local brewery that got into making honey based mead. It's in alot of bars around Boston. 

 

Hey Salty can I buy your lathe from you? Haha. So remind me, what is the point of a honey dipper of that size? I envy your lathes!

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OK I'll take 2! Haha. That makes more sense. I was wondering why one would need a giant honey dipper, besides the nostalgia.

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